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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Henry Boateng, George Oppong Appiagyei Ampong, Diyawu Rahman Adam, Kwame Simpe Ofori and Robert Ebo Hinson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of social interaction ties, trust and business networks in the acquisition of foreign business knowledge and foreign…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of social interaction ties, trust and business networks in the acquisition of foreign business knowledge and foreign institutional knowledge. It also assesses the effect of these types of knowledge on small and medium enterprises’ (SME) export performance. Furthermore, this study determines the moderating role of absorptive capacity in the relationship between foreign business knowledge, foreign institutional knowledge and export performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a survey research design using data from nontraditional SME exporters in Ghana. There were 257 respondents who were employees (managers/owners) of SMEs in Ghana. The model was analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Social interaction ties, trust and business networks have a significant effect on the acquisition of foreign business knowledge and foreign institutional knowledge. Furthermore, foreign business knowledge and foreign institutional knowledge have a significant positive effect on export performance. The path between foreign business knowledge and export performance is also moderated by absorptive capacity. However, the moderating role of absorptive capacity in the relationship between foreign institutional knowledge and export performance is not significant.

Originality

This study uses social capital to explain how SMEs acquire foreign business knowledge and foreign institutional knowledge, and how both affect SMEs’ export performance. Furthermore, it tests the moderating role of absorptive capacity in the relationship between foreign business knowledge, foreign institutional knowledge and export performance.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Robert Ebo Hinson, Ibn Kailan Abdul-Hamid and Ellis L.C. Osabutey

Market orientation and positioning have been widely recognized as organizational metrics linked to hotel performance. The purpose of this study is to offer the link among…

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4605

Abstract

Purpose

Market orientation and positioning have been widely recognized as organizational metrics linked to hotel performance. The purpose of this study is to offer the link among market orientation, positioning and hotel performance in Ghana’s (luxury) hotel sector. It also reports on the joint influence of market orientation and positioning on hotel performance in the same sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Three hypotheses were investigated on the link between market orientation and hotel performance, positioning and hotel performance, and the joint effect of market orientation and positioning on hotel performance. A survey of star-rated (luxury) hotels in the capital city of Ghana was used. One hundred and five responses were used in the analysis. Descriptive statistics, exploratory factor analysis and hierarchical regression were used to test the three hypotheses.

Findings

All hypotheses were accepted. Market orientation and positioning jointly affect hotel performance, and the study provides hotel managers with suggestions on how to enhance their performance via market orientation and positioning.

Research limitations/implications

Market orientation, positioning, and performance measures focused on management perspectives without including perceptions of customers.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few attempts to systematically investigate the intertwined concepts of market orientation, positioning and performance in a developing economy hospitality context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Iddrisu Mohammed, Mahmoud Abdulai Mahmoud and Robert Ebo Hinson

Utilising brand equity dimensions, this study aims to enhance the literature by conceptualising and testing heritage brand equity dimensions (i.e. awareness, image…

Abstract

Purpose

Utilising brand equity dimensions, this study aims to enhance the literature by conceptualising and testing heritage brand equity dimensions (i.e. awareness, image, quality and value) and the intentions of international tourists to revisit moderated by safety and security within the tourism sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was cross-sectional in nature and used the quantitative research approach with questionnaires for the collection of data. In total, 392 international tourists were purposively sampled from the departure hall of Kotoka International Airport. The data gathered were analysed using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM).

Findings

The findings revealed that heritage brand image, perceived quality and value had positive significant effects on the intentions of tourists to revisit. Nevertheless, heritage brand awareness had a negative insignificant impact on intentions to revisit. Safety and security significantly moderate the relationship between heritage brand equity and the intentions of international tourists to revisit.

Research limitations/implications

The Ghana tourism industry should increase the activities that will create more awareness, to generate the interest of potential tourists within the international community. Such initiatives can increase the likelihood of the destination being visited. In addition, policymakers must guarantee that associated government entities, as well as other stakeholders, work together within the tourism industry to promote safety and security.

Originality/value

This study adds to the ongoing discussions in the hospitality and tourism industry by providing a comprehensive overview of brand equity in heritage tourism, operationalised as heritage brand equity dimensions.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Aidatu Abubakari, Kwame Simpe Ofori, Henry Boateng, Koffi N’Da and Robert Ebo Hinson

It is well documented in the extant literature that knowledge plays a crucial role in small and medium enterprise (SME) internationalization. Exporting SMEs from…

Abstract

Purpose

It is well documented in the extant literature that knowledge plays a crucial role in small and medium enterprise (SME) internationalization. Exporting SMEs from developing economies faces many challenges, including lack of knowledge about institutions in foreign markets, inadequate knowledge about foreign institutions and limited internationalization knowledge (IK). However, research on the export performance of SMEs has thus far focused on the internationalization strategies of multinational corporations. This study aims to explore the effect of foreign market knowledge on SME export performance. The authors also assessed the moderating effect of employee absorptive capacity in the knowledge-performance nexus.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted a survey design to collect data from owners/managers of SMEs exporters in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. A total of 350 questionnaires were distributed based on convenience. Of this number, 257 usable responses were used in the final analysis. The authors tested the proposed model using partial least squares-structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings show that the three types of foreign market knowledge tested in this study, namely, foreign institutional knowledge (FIK), foreign business knowledge and IK have positive and significant effects on SME exporters’ performance. It also shows that employees’ absorptive capacity affects the relationship between FIK and SME exporters’ performance.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates the types of knowledge relevant to SME export performance. The study further demonstrates the moderating effect of employee absorptive capacity on the relationship between knowledge and export performance. The study advances existing knowledge on SME performance, especially from an emerging economy context.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Desmond Tutu Ayentimi, Robert Ebo Hinson and John Burgess

This paper, grounded on social capital and social networking theory, examines how postgraduate students in Ghana cultivate and utilise social resources towards career development.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper, grounded on social capital and social networking theory, examines how postgraduate students in Ghana cultivate and utilise social resources towards career development.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a qualitative study design, the authors recruited and conducted interviews with postgraduate student-workers undertaking a two-year Master of Science in International Business.

Findings

There was an active engagement and consciously pre-plan mobilisation of social resources and utilisation of social resources among the postgraduates. Despite the diverse processes of social capital development identified, four important key themes emerged underpinning social capital mobilisation and utilisation: (1) the recognition of the importance of social capital acquisition, (2) the strong link between social capital and individual successes in employment and business opportunities, (3) the importance of the utilisation of social resources for emotional support and (4) the use of social capital to reinforce the individual social identity and recognition of an individual's worth.

Practical implications

The authors offer a theoretical and practical contribution with a frame of understanding by demonstrating that there is more to social capital than economic gain.

Social implications

Unlike the findings from prior research in Africa, the strong institutional and cultural conditions did not constrain the key force of education and employability as drivers in attainment and social positioning. This is an interesting and positive finding from the research, especially in terms of the importance of providing educational opportunities to overcome institutional and cultural barriers to workforce participation and career development.

Originality/value

Social networks contribute to career success, and while the participants used social networks that reinforced ethnic and religious bonds, there is the opportunity to develop networks through other identity processes, especially education. Formal education imparts more than formal skills and qualifications. It provides the opportunity to access networks that transcend personal identity such as ethnicity and to get support for career development.

Details

Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Emmanuel Mogaji, Ogechi Adeola, Robert Ebo Hinson, Nguyen Phong Nguyen, Arinze Christian Nwoba and Taiwo O. Soetan

This study aims to explore how banks in Nigeria are marketing financial services to financially vulnerable customers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how banks in Nigeria are marketing financial services to financially vulnerable customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study research strategy was used to analyse three commercial banks and two microfinance banks. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with the banks' directors as well as from banks' published annual reports and archival images.

Findings

The study reveals that Nigerian banks develop different product development portfolios, adopt innovative traditional marketing schemes and apply inclusive technologies to reach and extend services to the unbanked and financially vulnerable customers in the society.

Research limitations/implications

Banks should focus on consumer engagement through the proactive development of technologies and employ innovative marketing methods. Customers' banking experiences can be enhanced if banks communicate with and educate customers about technological modes of engagement. In addition, financial service transaction support and financial literacy education can assist banks in marketing their services to financially vulnerable customers, in mutually beneficial ways.

Originality/value

This study shows how financial service operators' market and extend their services to financially vulnerable customers in emerging markets. It empirically establishes the importance of financial services to financially excluded customers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Emmanuel Mogaji, Robert Ebo Hinson, Arinze Christian Nwoba and Nguyen Phong Nguyen

Drawing on stakeholder theory, the purpose of this paper examines how Nigerian banks employ their corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives to empower women to…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on stakeholder theory, the purpose of this paper examines how Nigerian banks employ their corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives to empower women to participate in economic and commercial activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of this paper is regarding a thematic analysis of Nigerian banks' annual CSR and sustainability reports.

Findings

A theoretical framework was developed which illustrates the investment foundation (Sustainable Development Goals, Women's Empowerment Principles (WEPs) and Nigerian Sustainable Banking Principles) that supports the different levels of engagement (healthcare, financial, social and career empowerment) aimed at different groups of women (women at large, women in business and women in career) in the society.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings are confined to the banks in Nigeria, focussing on how they empower women to participate in economic and commercial activities.

Practical implications

It is paramount that Nigerian banks consistently report their CSR initiatives. When designing these initiatives, it is equally important to incorporate WEPs, as they are specifically focussed on women.

Social implications

Due to their low-level institutional and financial development, it is important that Nigerian banks design their CSR initiatives to improve women empowerment. While initiatives should be targeted at women's well-being and physical health, it is important to steer women towards financial and social independence through loans, grants and mentorship.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, no other research study has examined how banks in an emerging market use their CSR activities to empower women to participate in financial activities.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Richard Glavee-Geo, Aijaz A. Shaikh, Heikki Karjaluoto and Robert Ebo Hinson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the drivers of consumer engagement and its consequences via the experiences of mobile money services’ users in Ghana and to discuss…

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1356

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the drivers of consumer engagement and its consequences via the experiences of mobile money services’ users in Ghana and to discuss its implications for the society, financial service innovation, delivery and operations.

Design/methodology/approach

A pre-tested survey instrument was used with a sample of 595 mobile money services users in Ghana. SmartPLS application was used to analyze the data and report findings.

Findings

The study shows that perceived risk, consumer empowerment, subjective norm, performance expectancy and effort expectancy influence the affect component of consumer engagement and explain around half of its variance. The effect of perceived risk on consumer engagement was counterintuitive. Perceived risk was significant and positive for cognitive processing, whereas the effect was significant but negative for affect. The authors found support for the positive effect of cognitive processing on advocacy intention but no support for its effect on continuous usage. By contrast, affect strongly influenced both advocacy intention and continuous usage of mobile money services.

Practical implications

The authors highlight the implications of mobile money services to business and marketing/service managers, policy makers, non-banking entities (such as telecoms and financial technology firms) and to the society in general. The authors provide important insights into how service providers can manage consumer engagement process and formulate marketing strategies to target and promote this simple, but innovative service to consumers. Moreover, the authors discuss the societal implications of the study in Ghana, a developing country. The authors recommend several options for future studies in order to stimulate the research agenda on mobile financial services in general.

Originality/value

The present study shows that although mobile money was initially introduced to help consumers who hitherto have no access to formal banking services, this form of banking has become increasingly popular among various consumer segments as its usage and adoption has increased multifold largely in emerging and developing countries. The main contribution of this study is the development and testing of the “mobile money customer engagement model.” Moreover, this study shows the key factors that influence the engagement process and the effects of these factors as analyzed within the context of a developing country.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Thomas Anning-Dorson, Robert Ebo Hinson, Mohammed Amidu and Michael Boadi Nyamekye

Because of the paucity of empirical research on firm-level capabilities of firms for effective customer involvement, the purpose of this study is to evaluate service…

Abstract

Purpose

Because of the paucity of empirical research on firm-level capabilities of firms for effective customer involvement, the purpose of this study is to evaluate service firms’ capacity to coopt customers to enhance the innovativeness and firm performance relationship. This study conceptualizes involvement capabilities of service firms as a strategic driver that exploits their internal firm assets, which in turn facilitates the positive relationship between innovativeness and firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 344 managers of service firms across different sub-sectors in an emerging economy. The study first confirmed the constructs through confirmatory factor analysis before analyzing hypothesized relationships. Regression models were specified with robust standard errors to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The study found that involvement capability of service firms helps them to exploit their relational assets and create and manage strong customer participation. Additionally, it was found that involvement capabilities enable service firms to capitalize on the competencies of customers, which in turn improves the outcomes of their innovativeness. The results showed that the interaction between involvement capability and innovativeness enhances firm performance significantly.

Practical implications

Service firms can enhance customer participation in the value creation process by increasing their involvement capabilities. The increase in such capabilities will enhance the innovativeness of service firms, thereby improving their financial and non-financial performance.

Originality/value

This study offers guidance on how a firm’s innovativeness and customer involvement work together within the service operation to enhance firm performance.

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Robert Ebo Hinson

Banks spend thousands of dollars on several CSR activities and communicating the same to defined stakeholders becomes a strategic task that must be artfully managed by the…

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1524

Abstract

Purpose

Banks spend thousands of dollars on several CSR activities and communicating the same to defined stakeholders becomes a strategic task that must be artfully managed by the banks. Bank web sites now represent a useful communication platform in the reportage of CSR activities. This paper aims to report on CSR reportage amongst four leading banks in Ghana. Two of them have won CSR industry awards while the others have not.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was adopted using Hinson et al.'s online CSR framework to analyze CSR reportage in the four banks. Two of them (one indigenous and the other, local) had previously won CSR awards at a Ghana Banking Awards ceremony in the last five years, and two had not. The data drawn from the banks were analyzed within and across the four cases.

Findings

Agricultural development bank, the bank with the most socially responsible bank of the year awards, has the weakest online CSR reportage in the study with just one CSR report online.

Originality/value

CSR communication is a rapidly evolving field of scholarship and this study adds to the extant literature from a developing economy banking perspective.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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