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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2022

Maartje Clercx, Robert Didden, Leam A. Craig and Marije Keulen-de Vos

Forensic vigilance is a central competency that forensic professionals need to meet the complex demands of working in forensic settings. Until recently, no instrument for…

Abstract

Purpose

Forensic vigilance is a central competency that forensic professionals need to meet the complex demands of working in forensic settings. Until recently, no instrument for forensic vigilance was available. This study aims to develop a self-assessment tool of forensic vigilance for individuals and teams working in forensic settings, and investigated its psychometric properties.

Design/methodology/approach

The Forensic Vigilance Estimate (FVE) was presented to 367 forensic psychiatric professionals and 94 non-forensic psychiatric professionals by means of an online survey. Professionals rated themselves on 15 aspects of forensic vigilance.

Findings

The results indicated that the FVE had good psychometric properties, reflected by a good to excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s α of 0.903), a good split-half reliability (0.884) and good test–retest reliability (0.809). The factor structure of the FVE was captured by a one-factor model (RMSEA 0.09, SRMR 0.05, TLI 0.91 and CFI 0.92). Proportion of explained variance was 52%. Forensic professionals scored significantly higher than non-forensic professionals on the FVE (t(459) = 3.848, p = 0.002).

Practical implications

These results suggest that the FVE may reliably be used for research purposes, e.g. to study the effects of targeted training or intervention or increasing work experience on forensic vigilance or to study which factors influence forensic vigilance.

Originality/value

This study represents the first attempt to capture forensic vigilance with a measuring instrument.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Monique Delforterie, Jan Willem van den Berg, Betto Bolt, Teunis van den Hazel, Leam Craig and Robert Didden

While there is a significant proportion of people with a mild intellectual disability (MID) or borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) who commit sexual offenses, little…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is a significant proportion of people with a mild intellectual disability (MID) or borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) who commit sexual offenses, little research has focused on the risk factors for sexual recidivism in people with MID-BIF. The purpose of this paper is to compare the scores on the STATIC-99R and STABLE-2007 between persons with sexual offense histories with and without MID-BIF.

Design/methodology/approach

Data using the STATIC-99R and STABLE-2007 were collected in 85 male patients divided into an MID-BIF group (IQ 50–85, n=50) and comparison group (IQ>95, n=35).

Findings

The MID-BIF group and comparison group did not differ significantly on the static risk factors and total score of the STATIC-99R. However, of the 13 dynamic risk factors of the STABLE-2007, the MID-BIF group scored significantly higher on the items Impulsive acts, Poor problem solving skills and Lack of concern for others, while the comparison group scored significantly higher on the item Deviant sexual preference.

Originality/value

The higher score on a number of dynamic risk factors for patients with MID-BIF could partly be explained by the characteristics associated with MID-BIF. Although dynamic criminogenic risk factors which are usually identified as targets for treatment appear the same for people with and without MID-BIF who commit sexual offenses, adaptations to the modality of treatment will still need to be made for people with MID-BIF.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

William R. Lindsay, Anne van Logten, Robert Didden, Lesley Steptoe, John L. Taylor and Todd E. Hogue

Over the last ten years, there has been greater interest in the diagnosis of personality disorder (PD) in people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD)…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the last ten years, there has been greater interest in the diagnosis of personality disorder (PD) in people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). One important characteristic of a diagnostic system is that it should have validity as a contribution to utility. PD has been found to have a predictive relationship with violence and the purpose of this paper is to review two methods for the diagnosis of PD in offenders with IDD in order to evaluate the utility of the diagnoses.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 212 offenders with ID were recruited from three settings – maximum-security, medium/low security and community services. Diagnoses of PD in the case files were compared with a structured system of diagnosis based on DSM-IV traits.

Findings

There were significant differences between the two systems with a significantly higher frequency of PD diagnosis in the community forensic setting in the structured assessment system. There was no relationship between the case files diagnosis of PD and future violence but there was a significant predictive relationship between the structured diagnosis of PD and future violence with an AUC=0.62.

Research limitations/implications

As with all such studies, the research is limited by the quality of the case files available to the researchers.

Practical implications

Only the structured assessment of PD had utility for the prediction of violence. Reasons for the differences between the systems are discussed and suggestions made on how a diagnosis of PD can be structured for the busy clinician.

Social implications

The accurate diagnosis of PD has important implications since the PD is a crucial addition to any violence risk evaluation.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to review the way in which clinicians assess PD.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Elien Neimeijer, Judith Kuipers, Nienke Peters-Scheffer, Peer Van der Helm and Robert Didden

The purpose of this study is to provide an in-depth account of how individuelas with a mild intellectual disabilitiy or borderline intellectual functioning (MID-BIF; IQ…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide an in-depth account of how individuelas with a mild intellectual disabilitiy or borderline intellectual functioning (MID-BIF; IQ 50–85) perceive their group climate in a secure forensic setting. Giving voice to these service users may provide relevant insights for secure forensic settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to explore what individuals with MID-BIF experience with regard to their group climate.

Findings

In the interviews about the four domains of group climate (i.e. repression, support, growth and atmosphere), five overarching dimensions appeared, namely, autonomy, uniformity, recognition, competence and dignity. Depending on the person and the (treatment) context in which he/she resides, these five dimensions relate to all four factors of the group climate instrument.

Originality/value

From the perspective of individuals with MID-BIF, this study contributes by providing a framework to “fine-tune” group climate on five dimensions. Training socio-therapists to be sensitive to interpret ambiguous signals on these dimensions can contribute to optimizing group climate in secure forensic settings.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2020

Laura Neijmeijer, Hubert Korzilius, Hans Kroon, Henk Nijman and Robert Didden

Recent research on flexible assertive community treatment (FACT) for individuals with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) or borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) has…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research on flexible assertive community treatment (FACT) for individuals with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) or borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) has shown positive results. This paper aims to identify which client variables are associated with treatment outcome of FACT.

Design/methodology/approach

Analyses were performed on assessments made during a six-year longitudinal study in The Netherlands. Data comprised assessments of 281 clients with at least 2 measurements. Treatment outcome was measured by the learning disability version of the Health of the Nation Outcomes Scales. Demographic variables and dynamic risk variables of the short version of the Dynamic Risk Outcome Scales were selected as potential predictor variables of outcome. Data were analysed using linear mixed models.

Findings

Limited awareness of the need for treatment, limited treatment motivation and cooperation, limited social skills, impulsivity and substance abuse were significantly associated with worse treatment outcome. None of the demographic variables influenced treatment outcome significantly, and neither did intelligence quotient or having a judicial or civil measure.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the observational design, no causal inferences can be drawn.

Practical implications

This study produces guidelines regarding nature and scope of the treatment supply and the competences of professionals working in FACT MID/BIF teams.

Originality/value

This paper encourages other countries to make assertive outreach available for people with MID/BIF on a larger scale, taking into account the acquired insights.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 December 2009

Abstract

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

John L. Taylor

345

Abstract

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Marco O. Bertelli, Michele Rossi, Daniela Scuticchio and Annamaria Bianco

Diagnosing psychiatric disorders (PD) in adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) presents several issues and need specific skills and tools. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Diagnosing psychiatric disorders (PD) in adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) presents several issues and need specific skills and tools. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed description of the current status of art through a systematic mapping of the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the international literature on the basis of the following questions: what are the issues in the psychiatric diagnostic process for adults with ID? What methods and procedures have been used for psychiatric assessment in ID? To date, is it possible to identify some most effective procedures?

Findings

The analysis of the literature indicates that main issues of the psychiatric diagnostic process in adults with ID are the following: identification of psychiatric symptoms, behavioural equivalents, diagnostic criteria, setting, source of information, screening, and diagnostic tools. The evidence base is only emerging and although many relevant achievements have been reached in the last two decades, no definitive guideline has been produced. Most recent acquisition also allowed to identify some assessment procedures that are currently considered the most effective. Individualised assessment remains the best way to meet the needs of this heterogeneous and variable patient group.

Originality/value

This paper offers a comprehensive and updated description of current achievements and issues towards the assessment of PD in people with ID.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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