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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Donald T. Hawkins, Frank J. Smith, Bruce C. Dietlein, Eugene J. Joseph and Robert D. Rindfuss

Results of an in‐depth study of the electronic publishing (EP) industry, with particular emphasis on the consumer marketplace, are presented. EP was defined as the use of…

Abstract

Results of an in‐depth study of the electronic publishing (EP) industry, with particular emphasis on the consumer marketplace, are presented. EP was defined as the use of electronic media to deliver information to users in electronic form or from electronic sources. EP is contrasted to electronic‐aided publishing, which is the use of electronic means to format and produce a conventional information product. An “information chain” model of the information flows between publishers (or producers) and users was helpful in understanding the boundaries of EP and defining its markets. Following a review of the conventional publishing industry, a model of the forces driving the EP industry was derived. Although technology is the strongest driving force, it is by no means the only one; the others are economics, demographics, social trends, government policies, applications growth, and industry trends. Each of these forces is described in detail in a “cause and effect” scenario, from which keys to success in the EP marketplace are derived. Although there is some turmoil in the industry, with new services continuing to appear and disappear, the overall picture is one of optimism. EP should be a significant part of consumers' lives by the end of the decade.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Book part
Publication date: 6 June 2006

Christopher D. Moore and Dawn T. Robinson

Affect control theory describes a process in which individuals work to maintain existing situated identities. In this paper, we extend affect control theory to explain…

Abstract

Affect control theory describes a process in which individuals work to maintain existing situated identities. In this paper, we extend affect control theory to explain selective identity preferences in occupational settings. We argue that individuals form preferences about potential future identities with an eye to maintaining consistency between their potential experiences and their existing biographical identities. In particular, we suggest that occupational identity preferences reflect work-specific biographical identities called worker identities. We then predict that individuals who are seeking alternative or additional occupational identities will prefer those that evoke sentiments that are similar to those evoked by their worker identities. We find that current worker sentiments predict reports of desired and undesired future occupational identities, to include generalized military identities, to a remarkable degree. We discuss the implications for research on occupational mobility, work, and life course, as well as for existing identity theories.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-330-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Margaret Barwick

Discusses organisation, automation and performance measurementaspects of interlibrary loan department management, and developments incharging for and the preservation of…

Abstract

Discusses organisation, automation and performance measurement aspects of interlibrary loan department management, and developments in charging for and the preservation of ILL items. Highlights the problems of ILL in developing countries, and changes and developments in the rest of the world. Considers electronic document delivery systems, the effect of technological advances on libraries and the “Burgundy effect”.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2007

Sharon L. Harlan, Anthony J. Brazel, G. Darrel Jenerette, Nancy S. Jones, Larissa Larsen, Lela Prashad and William L. Stefanov

The urban heat island is an unintended consequence of humans building upon rural and native landscapes. We hypothesized that variations in vegetation and land use patterns…

Abstract

The urban heat island is an unintended consequence of humans building upon rural and native landscapes. We hypothesized that variations in vegetation and land use patterns across an urbanizing regional landscape would produce a temperature distribution that was spatially heterogeneous and correlated with the social characteristics of urban neighborhoods. Using biophysical and social data scaled to conform to US census geography, we found that affluent whites were more likely to live in vegetated and less climatically stressed neighborhoods than low-income Latinos in Phoenix, Arizona. Affluent neighborhoods had cooler summer temperatures that reduced exposure to outdoor heat-related health risks, especially during a heat wave period. In addition to being warmer, poorer neighborhoods lacked critical resources in their physical and social environments to help them cope with extreme heat. Increased average temperatures due to climate change are expected to exacerbate the impacts of urban heat islands.

Details

Equity and the Environment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1417-1

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Judith Walton

The purpose of this paper is to outline findings of a recent MSc study into electronic article provision in interlending and document supply presented to the Robert Gordon…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline findings of a recent MSc study into electronic article provision in interlending and document supply presented to the Robert Gordon University in June 2007.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is primarily based on data from questionnaires circulated to UK ILL departments (in academic, public, industrial, health and special libraries), recent users of ILL in a UK academic library and library managers within UK academic HE and public libraries.

Findings

Electronic document delivery was found to be used by half of libraries who responded: it was widespread in academic libraries, but seldom used in public libraries where demand for articles is comparatively low. Academic users appreciate the move to desktop delivery and the trend towards electronic delivery of articles in ILL is expected to grow in the future.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a survey data of libraries and users (in an academic environment) in the UK and Ireland. As such it provides a snapshot of the situation and represents the views of the participants at that time.

Practical implications

The user survey shows that, in an academic context, users welcome the move to desktop delivery.

Originality/value

This paper provides a snapshot of the prevalence of, and attitudes to, electronic article delivery within the UK and Ireland.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Kylie Baldwin

Abstract

Details

Egg Freezing, Fertility and Reproductive Choice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-483-1

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Brent C. Jacobs, Christopher Lee, David O’Toole and Katie Vines

This paper aims to describe the conduct and outcomes of an integrated assessment (IA) of the vulnerability to climate change of government service provision at regional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the conduct and outcomes of an integrated assessment (IA) of the vulnerability to climate change of government service provision at regional scale in New South Wales, Australia. The assessment was co-designed with regional public sector managers to address their needs for an improved understanding of regional vulnerabilities to climate change and variability.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used IA of climate change impacts through a complex adaptive systems approach incorporating social learning and stakeholder-led research processes. Workshops were conducted with stakeholders from NSW government agencies, state-owned corporations and local governments representing the tourism, water, primary industries, human settlements, emergency management, human health, infrastructure and natural landscapes sectors. Participants used regional socioeconomic profiling and climate projections to consider the impacts on and the need to adapt community service provision to future climate.

Findings

Many sectors are currently experiencing difficulty coping with changes in regional demographics and structural adjustment in the economy. Climate change will result in further impacts on already vulnerable systems in the forms of resource conflicts between expanded human settlements, the infrastructure that supports them and the environment (particularly for water); increased energy costs; and declining agricultural production and food security.

Originality/value

This paper describes the application of meta-analysis in climate change policy research and frames climate change as a problem of environmental pollution and an issue of development and social equity.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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