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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Robert D. Costigan, Richard C. Insinga, J. Jason Berman, Grazyna Kranas and Vladimir A. Kureshov

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between an employee's trust of coworkers and that employee's enterprising behavior. The extent to which cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between an employee's trust of coworkers and that employee's enterprising behavior. The extent to which cultural dimensions, in‐group collectivism and power distance, moderate the trust‐behavior relationship is considered.

Design/methodology/approach

A rigorous research methodology was employed to minimize potential problems with common method variance. Trust ratings were provided by 135 US, 203 Turkish, 100 Polish, and 86 Russian focal employees. Their 524 coworkers provided enterprising behavior ratings for these focal employees.

Findings

The results show that both cognitive‐ and affect‐based trusts of coworkers is associated with enterprising behavior. The findings also indicate that the affect‐based trust/enterprising behavior relationship is stronger in higher power distance cultures than in lower power distance cultures. In‐group collectivism, however, does not moderate the trust enterprising behavior relationships.

Originality/value

Trust is thought to nurture enterprising behavior in the workplace. This study looks at the relationship between trust of coworkers and enterprising behavior, an under investigated but key behavior in the modern organization. The moderating role of power distance implies that organizational interventions promoting affect‐based trust in coworker relationships may have bigger payoffs as far as behavior change in the high‐power distance context than in the low.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2005

Robert D. Costigan, Richard C. Insinga, Grazyna Kranas, Selim S. Ilter, Vladimir A. Kureshov and J. Jason Berman

This study investigates one aspect of the multi‐source feedback process: the agreement between self‐ratings and coworker ratings of workplace behavior. Moderators of…

Abstract

This study investigates one aspect of the multi‐source feedback process: the agreement between self‐ratings and coworker ratings of workplace behavior. Moderators of rating agreement (i.e., number of years that the coworker had known the employee, trustworthiness of the employee, and country status) are carefully examined. Eighty‐six Russian employee‐coworker dyads, 99 Polish dyads, and 95 U.S. dyads from more than 225 organizations participated. Regression results indicate that rating agreement was higher when the Polish and U.S. coworker knew the target employee a shorter period of time and when the Polish, Russian, and U.S. target employee was considered trustworthy.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 15 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Robert D. Costigan, Richard C. Insinga, J. Jason Berman, Selim S. Ilter, Grazyna Kranas and Vladimir A. Kureshov

This study examines the relationship of a supervisor's affect‐based trust and cognition‐based trust to a subordinate employee's self‐ratings of enterprising behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship of a supervisor's affect‐based trust and cognition‐based trust to a subordinate employee's self‐ratings of enterprising behavior, which includes creativity, risk taking, initiative, motivation, and assertiveness, and to the supervisor's and coworker's ratings of the subordinate's enterprising behavior. The extent to which the power distance and in‐group collectivism cultural variables moderate the relationship between affect‐based trust and enterprising behavior is assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses of US, Turkish, Polish, and Russian supervisor‐subordinate‐coworker triads were collected in a number of firms. Regression results were employed to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The findings of this study show that the supervisor's cognition‐based trust and affect‐based trust of the employee are associated with that employee's enterprising behavior. Significant two‐way interactions indicate that the relationship between affect‐based trust and enterprising behavior is stronger in the three collectivist countries than in the individualist USA. The moderating effects of power distance, on the other hand, appear to be negligible.

Originality/value

The main implication of this study's results is that human relations theories, which are based on the supervisor's top‐down trust of the subordinate employee, may be more effective in collectivist cultures than in individualist cultures.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

David Lusty

Examines the use of taxation as an alternative means of bringing otherwise untouchable criminals to justice and putting their businesses out of action, focusing on…

Abstract

Examines the use of taxation as an alternative means of bringing otherwise untouchable criminals to justice and putting their businesses out of action, focusing on Australia and the USA as countries which have achieved success through innovative use of taxation laws. Looks at the blind eye that the UK Inland Revenue has historically turned towards taxing illicit income, and recent reforms in the shape of the Proceeds of Crime Bill Part VI. Details the pioneering work of the US Internal Revenue Service’s Criminal Investigation Division, beginning in 1920 and continued by Senator Kefauver and Attorney‐General Robert Kennedy, with the war on drugs ongoing today; criminal tax weapons include proven tax deficiency and wilfulness, while civil tax weapons include income reconstruction, deficiency determinations, and jeopardy and termination assessments. Moves on to Australia’s Woodward, Williams and Costigan Royal Commissions, Special Prosecutor Robert Redlich, the National Crime Authority, and the Swordfish task force; criminal tax weapons of the Australian Tax Office include public fraud offences, while civil tax weapons include information‐gathering powers, default assessment, tax collection powers and procedures.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1944

If I were a wealthy man there are two things I would do : in the first place, I would found a Chair at one of our more progressive medical schools and instal in it a man…

Abstract

If I were a wealthy man there are two things I would do : in the first place, I would found a Chair at one of our more progressive medical schools and instal in it a man whose duty it would be to give as part of the clinical training of every student a course of lectures in the prevention of disease by good food. Something must be done to dispel from the medical man's mind the idea that vitamins are a kind of medicine to be prescribed for certain disorders, much as you give quinine to counter malaria. It has been said with much wisdom that it is better to build a fence at the top of the cliff than to maintain an ambulance at the bottom—incidentally, it is also cheaper. We do need to make it more clearly understood that, apart from all humanitarian considerations, the proper feeding of the people is a question of national insurance. This aspect of the future of nutrition has always seemed to me so obvious that it has surprised me that those whose job it is to understand the basic principles of insurance have not appreciated years ago its potential value to them. When I was in Canada recently I found, however, that they had got hold of the idea. One of the largest insurance companies in the Dominion is contributing $500,000 towards the cost of the national nutrition propaganda campaign because they are convinced that it is the most promising project for improving health and increasing expectation of life. The second benefaction I would make would be to finance the sending to each of about half a dozen countries of a small, well qualified and equipped team of young medical men and nutrition experts, trained to correlate on the spot information about diet and the incidence of disease. I would send one team to the heavy meat‐eating areas of the South American plains. They would solve in a year or two the long disputed question whether very high protein intakes are harmful to health and liable to produce certain disorders. I would send another team to South‐Eastern Europe to one of the areas where the peasants live almost entirely on vegetables, coarse bread and goats' milk. Is it true that these people have a very low incidence of digestive disorders and hardly ever suffer from cancer of the digestive tract? We do not know, but a team using standardised methods of examination and survey would not be long in finding the truth. Dr. Sinclair and his Oxford Nutrition Survey team has prepared the model of what is required. Such teams will, I believe, be widely used in the post‐war years. They may actually be required even earlier. They would be invaluable if they could be rushed into territories as soon as they are liberated from the enemy, where their task would be to survey and advise on the nutritional conditions of the liberated people—which in many cases, we fear, are likely to be grievous. War has few virtues. One undoubtedly is that activity in many fields of enterprise is enormously stimulated. Another is that problems can often be lifted clear of the arena of political dispute. This war of liberation will offer some compensation for the devastation and waste of human effort if it brings nearer by years the day when every man, woman and child can be assured that they will never know the want of the foods on which their health depends. Not until that day dawns can the Atlantic Charter, calling for freedom from fear, freedom from want, become reality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Shola Abidemi Olabode

Abstract

Details

Digital Activism and Cyberconflicts in Nigeria
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-014-7

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2019

Ipek Kocoglu, Gary Lynn, Yunho Jung, Peter G. Dominick, Zvi Aronson and Pamela Burke

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding on team listening by incorporating an action component. The authors empirically test the effect of this expanded…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding on team listening by incorporating an action component. The authors empirically test the effect of this expanded concept, namely team action listening on team success, and investigate how team commitment moderates the relationship between team trust and team action listening.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explored listening in teams in the field and in the lab, both qualitatively and quantitatively, through studying 474 team members representing 100 teams. The authors tested the hypotheses by structural equation modeling augmented with in-depth team interviews.

Findings

The findings showed that: teams demonstrate that they listen by taking action, teams that exhibit action listening are more successful, there is a direct relationship between team trust and team action listening and team commitment negatively moderates this relation in larger teams.

Practical implications

Managers should encourage taking action in team discussions. Yet, they should be wary of the detrimental effects of team commitment to team action listening particularly in teams with high trust. Commitment increases the risk of groupthink and decreases the participation to team discussions and listening. In particular, managers may benefit from keeping the team smaller, as in large teams, commitment suppresses the relationship between trust and team action listening.

Originality/value

This study extends research on team listening by adding the action aspect that distinguishes successful teams. It is one of the first to investigate the interrelationships between team trust, commitment, team action listening and success in teams.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2017

James M. Kohlmeyer, Robert J. Parker and Terry Sincich

As proposed in this paper, in public accounting firms, supervisors and managers provide junior accountants with career-related benefits that include: career development…

Abstract

As proposed in this paper, in public accounting firms, supervisors and managers provide junior accountants with career-related benefits that include: career development support; social support; and role modeling. Also, employees who receive such career-related benefits are more likely to believe that the firm provides career growth opportunities and more likely to trust their managers. Career growth opportunities and trust, in turn, positively affect organizational commitment, which reduces turnover intentions. In summary, the relation between career benefits and turnover is mediated by several variables: career growth opportunities, trust in managers, and organizational commitment. Results of a survey of junior employees in public accounting firms support these assertions (with the exception of social support).

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Robert Detmering, Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Samantha McClellan and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2013.

Findings

Provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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