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Abstract

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part

Mark Tausig and Rudy Fenwick

The “Social Determinants of Health” construct is well-entrenched in the way that both health care providers and researchers think about the effects of social conditions on…

Abstract

Purpose

The “Social Determinants of Health” construct is well-entrenched in the way that both health care providers and researchers think about the effects of social conditions on health. Although there are a number of theories that fall under this rubric for the social production of health and illness, the core of this construct is the idea that social stratification leads to health disparity. In this chapter we show how such a mechanism might work for relating social stratification and job stress.

Methodology/approach

We used the pooled 2002, 2006, 2010 Quality of Work Life modules of the General Social Survey to test a model of the relationships between gender, age, education, and nativity with “bad jobs” and indicators of health status.

Findings

Findings show that social status is positively associated with job quality and with health in turn. Lower social status characteristics are related to bad jobs and poorer health.

Research limitations/implications

Health disparities are thus “explained” by the consequences of social status for occupation and job quality, thereby depicting exactly how health disparities arise in normal social life. The theory and results underscore the importance of explicitly modeling social status factors in explanations of health disparities.

Social implications

It is common to relate health disparities to social status but it is not common to show the mechanisms whereby social status actually produces health disparities. Addressing health disparities means addressing the consequences of social inequalities for normal activities of social life such as work. Improving job quality would be a health “treatment” that addresses health disparities.

Originality/value

This chapter demonstrates the value of explicitly tracing the consequences of status differences on differences in social context such as work conditions and then health. In the study of health disparities this is not often done. In this chapter we show how social inequality leads to occupational and job quality differences that, in turn, lead to health differences.

Details

Special Social Groups, Social Factors and Disparities in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-467-9

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Article

Marilynn Collins and Robert Bloom

The case is made for oral history as a research tool, and apossible role in respect to the accountancy profession is recommendedand discussed: the study of the evolution…

Abstract

The case is made for oral history as a research tool, and a possible role in respect to the accountancy profession is recommended and discussed: the study of the evolution of accounting standards. The collection and preservation of oral records is described. Illustrative examples are provided. The benefits and drawbacks of this kind of research are analysed.

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Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article

Parker of, Melford Stevenson J. and J. Willis

May 1, 1969 Redundancy — Calculation of payment — Continuity of employment — National trade union agreement providing for employment by any electricity board to be treated…

Abstract

May 1, 1969 Redundancy — Calculation of payment — Continuity of employment — National trade union agreement providing for employment by any electricity board to be treated as continuous — Employee transferred from one area board to another — Subsequent return to employment of first board — Whether continuity of employment broken — Whether analogy with “associated company” applicable — “Absent from work” — “Regarded as contriving in the employment…” — Companies Act, 1948 (11 & 12 Geo. 6, c. 38), s.154 — Contracts of Employment Act, 1963 (11 & 12 Eliz.2, c.49), Sch.1 paras. 5(1) (c), 10,10A — Redundancy Payments Act, 1965 (c.62), s.48(4) (5).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article

Jen Abrams and Tim Kindseth

Describes Poetry in the Branches, a multi‐layered, replicable program model, devised by Poets House, New York, to foster the link between librarians, the public and the…

Abstract

Describes Poetry in the Branches, a multi‐layered, replicable program model, devised by Poets House, New York, to foster the link between librarians, the public and the living tradition of poetry. Provides a comprehensive list of titles of contemporary poetry collections by single authors and anthologies.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article

Robert Crawford and Matthew Bailey

The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of oral history for marketing historians and provide case studies from projects in the Australian context to demonstrate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of oral history for marketing historians and provide case studies from projects in the Australian context to demonstrate its utility. These case studies are framed within a theme of market research and its historical development in two industries: advertising and retail property.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines oral histories from two marketing history projects. The first, a study of the advertising industry, examines the globalisation of the advertising agency in Australia over the period spanning the 1950s to the 1980s, through 120 interviews. The second, a history of the retail property industry in Australia, included 25 interviews with executives from Australia’s largest retail property firms whose careers spanned from the mid-1960s through to the present day.

Findings

The research demonstrates that oral histories provide a valuable entry port through which histories of marketing, shifts in approaches to market research and changing attitudes within industries can be examined. Interviews provided insights into firm culture and practices; demonstrated the variability of individual approaches within firms and across industries; created a record of the ways that market research has been conducted over time; and revealed the ways that some experienced operators continued to rely on traditional practices despite technological advances in research methods.

Originality/value

Despite their ubiquity, both the advertising and retail property industries in Australia have received limited scholarly attention. Recent scholarship is redressing this gap, but more needs to be understood about the inner workings of firms in an historical context. Oral histories provide an avenue for developing such understandings. The paper also contributes to broader debates about the role of oral history in business and marketing history.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Abstract

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Electronic Resources Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

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Article

Robert Collins, Matt Hector‐Taylor and Marilyn Wedgwood

The EHE programme at Sheffield University focuses primarily on theprocess of curriculum change so as to become embedded within theinstitution. In the first year of the…

Abstract

The EHE programme at Sheffield University focuses primarily on the process of curriculum change so as to become embedded within the institution. In the first year of the programme, these changes to curricula are generally experimental, testing new techniques and searching for ways actively to involve students. Departments define “enterprise” in the context of their particular subject. This has resulted in a diverse range of curriculum development projects operating in a large number of departments. Each project aims to address one or more of the four main objectives of the EHE programme at Sheffield: personal skill development, collaborative work with employers, IT skill development and monitoring of student achievement through a personal profile. A key feature of the Sheffield programme is the aim of actively involving students in all aspects of curriculum change. A Student Development Manager is employed to secure student participation in EHE developments. A tripartite partnership is in operation, between staff, employers and students at Sheffield, to support and stimulate the development of EHE.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

Robert S. Collins and Roger W. Schmenner

The purpose of this paper is to document the extent to which the relative performance of plants varies over an extended period of time, with some plants performing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the extent to which the relative performance of plants varies over an extended period of time, with some plants performing persistently well and sister plants performing persistently poorly. It examines why this phenomenon occurs.

Design/methodology/approach

It does so through interviews and surveys of senior manufacturing executives who oversee multiple plants.

Findings

The interview and survey results are consistent with one another and point to the importance of the “mentality” of a plant's management and workforce: how they think about the factory and its operations. The nature of that mentality is explored.

Originality/value

This paper captures what the “grey hairs” of manufacturing think of factory performance and how to pursue it.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part

Christopher S. Collins and Robert A. Rhoads

Globalization has become such an all-encompassing concept that it is almost meaningless. However, most scholars recognize that the term conveys in some manner or form a…

Abstract

Globalization has become such an all-encompassing concept that it is almost meaningless. However, most scholars recognize that the term conveys in some manner or form a shrinkage of time and space such that events happening in one part of the world have the potential to impact other locales (Giddens, 1999; Held, 1991). Beyond this most basic meaning, it is hard to find any agreement on what the term actually conveys or when in fact the world actually entered a global age (Morrow & Torres, 2000). Given the vagueness of globalization as a concept, the challenge then is to be as clear as possible in discussing various forces related to globalization that may impact a particular phenomenon under study. In the case of this chapter, the phenomenon of interest is university transformation in the developing world.

Details

The Worldwide Transformation of Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1487-4

1 – 10 of over 2000