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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Yvonne Morse and Wendy Davis

The CASTLE (Computer Automated Software for the Total Library Environment) System was developed and installed in the Ringling School of Art and Design Library from March…

Abstract

The CASTLE (Computer Automated Software for the Total Library Environment) System was developed and installed in the Ringling School of Art and Design Library from March, 1983 through September, 1983. The System is divided into six main areas: Circulation, On‐Line Catalog, Inventory and File Maintenance, Audio/Visual Equipment, Accounting, and Information and Management Reporting. Written from the distinct points of view of both programmer and librarian, this article describes the project's beginning phases, then how it developed as a unified effort and, finally, became a reality. The capabilities, flexibility, and completeness of the system are demonstrated.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Noel Addy and Timothy Yoder

We survey private foundations for governance factors and internal processes that help explain why they barely miss (or not) the benchmark for qualifying distributions that…

Abstract

We survey private foundations for governance factors and internal processes that help explain why they barely miss (or not) the benchmark for qualifying distributions that would save them taxes on net investment income. Private foundations are subject to a 2% tax rate on their net investment income. If qualifying distributions are above a benchmark, the foundation qualifies for a 50% reduction in the tax rate to a 1% tax rate. This tax rate structure provides a “cliff effect” where the additional distributions required to qualify for the lower tax rate may actually be less than the potential tax savings (Sansing & Yetman, 2006). For example, one foundation in our sample could have saved $15,613 in tax by paying an additional $318 in distributions. We view this situation as a clear governance failure. Our first contribution to the literature is that board interest and information system strength affect the likelihood of avoiding such a governance failure, even after controlling for the general quality of management with management compensation and professional fees. Our second contribution is that foundations without sufficient financial savvy and sophistication appear to pay higher taxes. Given the large number of small, relatively unsophisticated foundations in America, differential tax rates based on sophistication is an interesting policy debate.

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Advances in Taxation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-593-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1958

Among their wide range of steel drums for the packaging of liquid products, Victor Blagden & Co. Ltd. of Manchester manufacture containers painted with a…

Abstract

Among their wide range of steel drums for the packaging of liquid products, Victor Blagden & Co. Ltd. of Manchester manufacture containers painted with a chemically‐resistant coating for such products as solvents and strong chemicals which attack more conventional paints. For this purpose an ‘Epikote’ phenolic lacquer system (Robert Ingham Clark 2088) is used, two coats being applied automatically. The first coat is lightly stoved and the drums are fully cured after the second coat. The accompanying photographs show stages in the painting process.

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 5 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

George K. Chacko

The singular success of Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. in rescuing IBM from dismemberment and destruction in terms of his shifting the institutional memory of 300,000 employees…

Abstract

Purpose

The singular success of Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. in rescuing IBM from dismemberment and destruction in terms of his shifting the institutional memory of 300,000 employees from corporate politics to customer service focus, has been expalined memory management explain failures as well?

Design/methodology/approach

Chacko (memory management in survival decisions of corportions 1956‐2003, Barmarick Publications, UK, 2006) published a sequence of ordered procedures (protocol) of memory management: memory management disequilibria dimensions (MD)2 protocol. This paper applies the protocol to the birth and death of the GO computer.

Findings

The memory management disequilibria dimensions (MD)2 protocol analyzes accurately the Jerry Kaplan narrative of founding on August 14, 1987, the GO corporation to AT&T firing the last remaining employees of EO, the spin‐off of GO on July 29, 1994. (MD)2 Step 1: Chief Ntrapreneur officer will to win became a casualty, founder CTO/CNO Kaplan reflecting that money wasn’t the problem, but loss of faith of the chief financial officer on the viability, of the Software VP on the development schedules, of the CEO on market momentum, and of the CTO/ECO on the “stick‐to‐itveness” of the new management team.

Orginality/value

The habit patterns of thought and action that make a corporation/country unique are instructed/inscribed in individual/institional memory. This paper demonstrates that the (MD)2 protocol explains both success and failure, providing a basis to make memory management effective.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1955

Metal Industries Ltd. Changes in the Metal Industries Ltd. board of directors have taken place owing to the decision of R. W. McCrone to retire, after 33 years as managing…

Abstract

Metal Industries Ltd. Changes in the Metal Industries Ltd. board of directors have taken place owing to the decision of R. W. McCrone to retire, after 33 years as managing director and more recently as chairman, in order to devote himself more freely to other interests. The directors will recommend his appointment as one of the honorary presidents of the company. He will be succeeded as chairman by J. S. Hutchison.

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Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 2 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Tony Lachowetz, William A. Sutton, Mark McDonald, Rodney Warnick and John Clark

The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify those corporate sales activities that lead to teams' higher rates of retention of corporate customers. Twenty-two of…

Abstract

The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify those corporate sales activities that lead to teams' higher rates of retention of corporate customers. Twenty-two of 29 National Basketball Association (NBA) teams participated. Teams were categorized based on their success at retaining corporate customers for the three-season period 1998-99 to 2000-01. Key conclusions that led to higher rates of customer retention were: 1) teams having total control over the sale of corporate inventory; 2) corporate sales staff training; and 3) teams understanding that customers needed assistance in the activation of sponsorship programs.

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International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Laurie Larwood, Sergei Rodkin and Dean Judson

The need to maintain up-to-date technological skills despite an aging workforce makes it imperative that organizations increasingly focus on retraining older employees…

Abstract

The need to maintain up-to-date technological skills despite an aging workforce makes it imperative that organizations increasingly focus on retraining older employees. This article develops an adult career model based on the acquisition of technological skills and gradual skill obsolescence. The model suggests the importance of retraining and provides practical implications to the development of retraining programs. Suggestions for future research are also offered.

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International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Robert M. Brown and Martin E. Moser

This paper examines the sensitivity of the Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) inventory model to lot size errors when the purchase cost per unit, C, and the replenishment cost…

Abstract

This paper examines the sensitivity of the Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) inventory model to lot size errors when the purchase cost per unit, C, and the replenishment cost per order, A, are both dependent on the amount ordered, Q. A formula for the percentage increase in average annual variable costs due to using a Q‐value different from Q is derived, and is shown to be the same as that for the simple EOQ and backorders model.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Edward J. Zychowicz

This paper examines the formation of pension plans from a corporate finance perspective. The theoretical underpinnings for selecting a defined‐benefit or…

Abstract

This paper examines the formation of pension plans from a corporate finance perspective. The theoretical underpinnings for selecting a defined‐benefit or defined‐contribution plan are discussed and used to form empirically testable hypotheses. Linear probability and logit models are used to identify corporate financial characteristics that affect the likelihood of forming a defined‐benefit or defined‐contribution plan. The results strongly indicate that firms with high degrees of debt and intangible assets are least likely to form defined‐benefit plans in a post‐reversion situation, while firm size enhances the probability of forming defined‐benefit plans. The growth in private retirement plans over the past quarter century has made pension fund management a critical concern for many financial managers. The total amount of assets in private pension plans amounted to approximately $150 billion in 1970, while this figure was about $2 trillion in 1989. A corresponding trend to this growth has been an acceleration in the formation of defined‐contribution plans relative to defined‐benefit plans. In 1975 about 29 percent of all plans were defined‐contribution plans, and 71 percent were defined‐benefit plans. In contrast, defined‐contribution plans comprised 55 percent of all plans in 1988, while 45 percent were defined‐benefit plans.1 Gustman and Steinmeier (1987) suggest that the shift to defined‐contribution plans in recent years may be attributable to shifts in jobs in the economy away from the manufacturing sector and toward the service sector. Furthermore, the role of unions, firm size, and administrative costs have also been sighted as factors which partially explain the economy wide shift toward defined‐contribution plans (see Gustman and Steinmeier (1989), Clark and McDermed (1990), and Kruse (1991)). In this paper, we address the pension choice by examining the formation of individual plans from a corporate finance perspective. Specifically, we examine the pension choice issue when firms are faced with making this decision after the termination of an overfunded defined‐benefit plan. The remainder of this paper is organized as follows. Section I discusses the possible motives for selecting one plan over the other, and develops testable hypotheses. The data and methodology are discussed in section II, while section III presents the empirical results. Section IV summarizes and concludes the paper.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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