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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2018

Robert Chapman Wood

This case describes how Varian Medical Systems, the successor to one of the pioneers of Silicon Valley, created a business with $11.6 billion in market cap by listening to…

Abstract

Purpose

This case describes how Varian Medical Systems, the successor to one of the pioneers of Silicon Valley, created a business with $11.6 billion in market cap by listening to dreams of its physician customers and their scientist colleagues and finding ways to fulfill them over several decades.

Design/methodology/approach

A key business opportunity that spurred the company was to identify the most perceptive thought-leader customers, then bring them into a long-term, system-building partnership.

Findings

If companies envision the future and work with perceptive, far-sighted customers and others who will benefit from high-value innovation, together they stand a real chance of achieving a desired future.

Practical implications

Establish forums where perceptive, visionary customers meet with executives, marketers and key developers to identify what you should deliver in the immediate future and in years beyond.

Originality/value

The case described the practical steps the company took to implement customer participation in the innovation process over many decades.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2009

Robert Chapman Wood

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321

Abstract

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Robert Chapman Wood

Explains (using a model and cases) how companies that lack a capability for continual strategic innovation can bring one into existence.

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5026

Abstract

Purpose

Explains (using a model and cases) how companies that lack a capability for continual strategic innovation can bring one into existence.

Design/methodology/approach

Author developed histories of how continual innovation emerged or failed to emerge in six firms, drew conclusions based on what worked in the successes.

Findings

Strategic innovation gets started with a five‐step process that involves improvising initial innovation processes, then learning from what was improvised.

Research limitations/implications

Though the companies studied were selected to represent different industries and kinds of strategic innovation, the number was relatively small. Findings should be replicated in studies of more firms.

Practical implications

Instead of using standard organizational change models that call for clear goals that leaders can manage to, firms seeking repeated strategic innovation should create inspiring but necessarily vague goals, improvise first steps toward them, and encourage emergence of innovation routines based on what was improvised.

Originality/value

Provides an evidence‐based model of how to bring Continual Strategic Innovation into existence.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Osvald M. Bjelland and Robert Chapman Wood

For half a century, experts have offered leaders a standard model of how to transform organizations. It involves unfreezing them, developing a clear picture of the future

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3588

Abstract

Purpose

For half a century, experts have offered leaders a standard model of how to transform organizations. It involves unfreezing them, developing a clear picture of the future, managing to make the picture a reality, and then changing systems to support the new ways. However, studies have shown that transformation does not always follow this script. This paper aims to look at four alternatives.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews more than 50 well documented transformations and compares them to both the standard model and non‐mainstream ideas about transformation

Findings

The paper offers a guide to five distinct, reproducible ways of radically altering organizations: the standard model process (“holism”), transformation through the ambidextrous form, transformation through acquisition/restructuring, the Collins “Good‐to‐great” process, an improvisational transformation process. Hybrid approaches are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Providing a comprehensive guide to corporate transformation is a problematic undertaking. The authors could not review every case study of transformation, so they cannot say with certainty that their list of documented transformation methods is all‐inclusive. However, their survey gave them good reason to believe these are the five best‐documented transformation processes.

Practical implications

The paper explains the important advantages of each approach to transformation that make it appropriate for particular purposes.

Originality/value

When organizations need radical change, leaders need to understand the strengths and weaknesses of all five well‐documented alternative paths to transformation.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Osvald M. Bjelland and Robert Chapman Wood

– The authors examine the approach by which Sam Walton, a 48-year-old when he took his first technology course, drove creation of a new set of technology for retailing.

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720

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examine the approach by which Sam Walton, a 48-year-old when he took his first technology course, drove creation of a new set of technology for retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

By breaking Walton’s approach into five stages, the authors show how his way of working points to a credible path for leaders with limited background in technology to lead technological change.

Findings

Senior leaders can apply Walton’s systematic way of leading for creation of excellent processes to accomplish customer-focused technology innovation in the modern era.

Practical implications

Five elements of Walton’s tech innovation leadership are reviewed and analyzed.

Originality/value

This article offers insights about how Walton was able to form a tech savvy team of managers and synthesize a vision about the potential of technology to produce operational breakthroughs far in advance of his competition.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

Robert Chapman Wood, Daniel S. Levine, Gerald A. Cory and Daniel R. Wilson

This chapter introduces evolutionary neuroscience and its organizational applications, especially its usefulness for motivation analysis in macrolevel disciplines such as…

Abstract

This chapter introduces evolutionary neuroscience and its organizational applications, especially its usefulness for motivation analysis in macrolevel disciplines such as strategic management. Macrolevel organizational disciplines have mostly lacked a theory of motivation beyond self-interest assumptions, which fail to explain many important macrolevel organizational phenomena. Evolutionary neuroscience provides an empirically grounded, parsimonious perspective on the human brain and brain evolution which helps clarify the profound complexities of motivation. Evolutionary neuroscience’s theory of the physiological causes of self- and other-interested motivation can support better macrolevel motivation analysis and unify disparate, potentially conflicting motivation theories. Examples are offered of how neuroscience-based motivation theory can support more comprehensive strategic management analysis of competences and competitive advantage.

Details

Organizational Neuroscience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-430-0

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Robert M. Robert

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110

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Robert M. Randall

Downloads
484

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Robert M. Randall

Downloads
93

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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