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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

María Pilar Martínez‐Ruiz, Ana Isabel Jiménez‐Zarco and Robert Cascio

This paper aims to establish the main factors that underlie store attributes, to examine which exert the greatest influences on the achievement of a maximum level of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish the main factors that underlie store attributes, to examine which exert the greatest influences on the achievement of a maximum level of customer satisfaction. This study seeks to determine if there are significant differences not only in the factor compositions but also in their influence on customer satisfaction, depending on the country of residence of focal customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The test of the proposed framework consists of analyses of two samples of customers that purchased in grocery stores in Spain and the USA. Following a factor analysis of the principal components, a binary logistic regression analysis tests the influence of the identified factors on customer satisfaction.

Findings

This work contributes to extant literature by assessing differences in the main factors that contribute to satisfaction with food stores, depending on the location of the customer.

Practical implications

This work is especially useful to grocery retailers that operate, or plan to operate, in different countries; it outlines key factors to consider to achieve upper‐bounded customer satisfaction scores.

Originality/value

The proposed classification of attributes and factors, according to their importance for customers' evaluations in different countries, includes three main factors. The first‐order factor includes the most valued attributes by all customers, independent of the country of residence. The second‐order factors include attributes with lesser importance though still valued by customers; the importance depends on the country of residence. Finally, the third‐order factor attributes are valued relatively less.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Neil Towers

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

Abstract

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Mark Cordano, Robert F. Scherer and Crystal L. Owen

This paper examines attitudes toward women managers in Chile (n=194) and the USA (n=218) using the women as managers scale (WAMS) and a Spanish version of WAMS developed…

Abstract

This paper examines attitudes toward women managers in Chile (n=194) and the USA (n=218) using the women as managers scale (WAMS) and a Spanish version of WAMS developed for this study. Across both cultures, two coherent measures were labeled “acceptance” and “ability”. No cultural differences in the acceptance of women as managers were discovered. The differences in acceptance were divided solely according to sex. There were differences in the perceived ability of women managers for both the sex and culture variables. The paper then compares the impact of the sex and culture variables. Results show that sex explained approximately three times more variance than culture. These findings can inform both the expatriate woman manager who is likely to encounter friction in interactions with males in many cultures and the human resource manager interested in improving the success of women managers working overseas.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2019

Snejina Michailova and Dana L. Ott

Abstract

Details

Talent Management in Small Advanced Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-450-8

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2003

Crystal L. Owen, Robert F. Scherer, Michael Z. Sincoff and Mark Cordano

The objective of the current study was to determine if stereotypical perceptions of women as managers existed among men and women in two different cultural settings, the…

Abstract

The objective of the current study was to determine if stereotypical perceptions of women as managers existed among men and women in two different cultural settings, the U.S. and Chile. Using the Women as Managers Scale (WAMS), 412 participants from the U.S. and Chile responded to questions about their perceptions of women performing managerial roles and tasks. Gender and culture effects were identified at both the multivariate and univariate levels.1 The results showed that male subjects in both cultures had more stereotypical and negative perceptions of women as managers than did female subjects, and the U.S. participants (both male and female) had more positive and less stereotypical perceptions of women as managers than the Chilean participants. Implications for research and practice in cross‐cultural and international management are discussed.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2006

Robert E. Ployhart and Paul D. Bliese

Work organizations and the employees within these organizations face considerable environmental pressures requiring adaptive change. Several forces have contributed to…

Abstract

Work organizations and the employees within these organizations face considerable environmental pressures requiring adaptive change. Several forces have contributed to this need for great adaptation. These are described in many excellent sources (e.g., Cascio, 2003; Ilgen & Pulakos, 1999); here we briefly review their implications for individual adaptability.

Details

Understanding Adaptability: A Prerequisite for Effective Performance within Complex Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-371-6

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Kadir Atalay, Ellen Garbarino and Robert Slonim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether moral licensing – that is, doing something morally dubious after doing the “right” thing – influences the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether moral licensing – that is, doing something morally dubious after doing the “right” thing – influences the attractiveness of an existing virtue–vice bundle.

Design/methodology/approach

A prize-linked savings (PLS) account that combines a savings (certificate of deposit) and a probabilistic component (lottery) was examined. In two online experiments, the level of moral license offered by the PLS was manipulated through what institution offered the PLS or a lottery alternative.

Findings

When the source of the PLS account was more moral (Study 1) or the source of the lottery was less moral (Study 2), the interest in the PLS increased.

Research limitations/implications

Moral licensing plays a role in making virtue–vice bundles appealing and supports that the need for moral license can be used to increase interest in more morally acceptable behaviour. However, manipulating moral license in the field is complex and requires further research.

Practical implications

Practitioners may increase PLS savings rates via messaging that emphasises how the saving aspect offers the customer the license to indulge in the gamble; similar to how McDonald’s sold the idea of indulging in fast food with “You deserve a break today”.

Originality/value

This paper shows that the attractiveness of the PLS virtue–vice bundle is sensitive to the moral acceptability of the components, suggesting their ability to offer the consumer moral license to engage in a socially sanctioned action is part of their appeal. Also, demonstrating that the desire for moral license can be used to encourage positive behaviour.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

Many factors may influence the training and development of middle-skill, low-skill, and disadvantaged workers. Within the United States and worldwide there are many…

Abstract

Many factors may influence the training and development of middle-skill, low-skill, and disadvantaged workers. Within the United States and worldwide there are many middle-skilled, low-skilled, and disadvantaged workers whom training and development professionals must consider as organizations seek to expand their workforce and increase productivity using technology. Temporary agencies employ many middle-skilled, low-skilled, and disadvantaged workers; however, there is very little information regarding how effective these agencies are in developing these workers beyond the skill level with which they enter the agency.

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

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