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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Robert C. Erffmeyer, Jamal A. Al‐Khatib, Mohammed I. Al‐Habib and Joseph F. Hair

The aftermath of the 1990 Middle East war and the region′ssubsequent exposure to Western technologies and lifestyles hascontributed to an accelerated opening up of Arabic…

Abstract

The aftermath of the 1990 Middle East war and the region′s subsequent exposure to Western technologies and lifestyles has contributed to an accelerated opening up of Arabic culture to Western ideas. Often relegated to a secondary role in the Arab culture, changing market conditions have helped increase the importance of many marketing functions and, in particular, personal selling. Given the increased importance of personal selling in a high context culture, such as that of Saudi Arabia, the development of a qualified salesforce should significantly improve a firm′s competitive position. This exploratory study examined the extent to which sales training philosophies and practices differ between Saudi Arabia and the United States. Findings reveal the limited extent of Saudi sales training programmes and offer insight into the future development of marketing and sales training in this Arab culture as well as implications for both Arab and foreign businesses.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Robert C. Erffmeyer and Dale A. Johnson

Previous research has revealed that sales trainers have been reluctant to incorporate distance education training methods into their programs. This study investigated the…

Abstract

Previous research has revealed that sales trainers have been reluctant to incorporate distance education training methods into their programs. This study investigated the effectiveness of six different teaching methods in delivering one sales training course to a national salesforce from one organization. Training methods ranged from no‐tech to high‐tec and included: an on‐site instructor, a written manual, a manual plus videotape, video‐conferencing, audio‐graphics and an interactive multi‐media computer‐based training program. Pre‐ and post‐training evaluations of course content indicated significant improvements. Media were evaluated in terms of training required, number of participants to be trained and other technical considerations. Measures of course content revealed no significant differences in terms of delivery methods. Strengths, weaknesses and situations for optimal utilization of media and delivery method were identified. Findings should assist sales training managers in making more informed choices among distance education delivery options.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Jeffrey E. McGee and Troy A. Festervand

Describes the experiences of an American professor who taught a graduate course in cross‐cultural management at a Portuguese university. Outlines the overall experience…

Abstract

Describes the experiences of an American professor who taught a graduate course in cross‐cultural management at a Portuguese university. Outlines the overall experience before detailing several pedagogic issues which were unforeseen/problematic. Proposes ten axioms to guide similar future internal exchange experiences. Emphasizes four areas of difficulty, preparation, expectations, conduct and relationships.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Book part
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Travis Holt, Lisa A. Burke-Smalley and Christopher Jones

In this study, we use the well-researched and validated Big Five model of personality traits to examine accounting students’ career interests in auditing. Using the…

Abstract

In this study, we use the well-researched and validated Big Five model of personality traits to examine accounting students’ career interests in auditing. Using the person-job fit literature as a springboard for our study, we investigate the influence of accounting students’ personality traits on their career interests in auditing using a research survey. We uncover a general “trait gap” (i.e., lack of fit) between accounting students’ own personality traits and their perceptions of the ideal auditor, which presents implications for workplace readiness. Additionally, analysis focusing on students who particularly want to work in auditing indicates that those with more auditing work experience are more likely to identify auditing as their preferred job. Furthermore, results indicate that accounting students higher on openness to experience tend to view auditing jobs as more desirable. Finally, accounting students who prefer the auditing career path perceive the ideal auditor as extroverted, agreeable, and open to experience. We extend prior findings in the accounting education literature surrounding personality traits and their impact on student career choices. Because advising students for a career path suiting their traits and talents is important for each student and the accounting profession, our study’s insights into the “matching process” add value to career advising.

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Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-180-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Stephan F. Gohmann, Robert M. Barker, David J. Faulds and Jian Guan

This paper examines how perceptions about salesforce automation (SFA) systems are influenced by the perceived accuracy of the information the system provides.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how perceptions about salesforce automation (SFA) systems are influenced by the perceived accuracy of the information the system provides.

Design/methodology/approach

Three hypotheses are tested. They are as follows. Sales people who perceive that the information is inaccurate will be less likely to: have a positive perception of the system; think that their training was helpful; and think that the system improves their productivity. Chi‐square tests are used to test the association between the perceptions of information accuracy and the statements in the hypotheses.

Findings

Negative perceptions about the accuracy of information leads to negative perceptions about other aspects of the SFA system.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines the results for only one particular organization. The results may not be generalizable to other organizations. As similar data about other SFA systems become available, this study can be used as a basis for examining the effect of information accuracy on perceptions of SFA systems.

Originality/value

Since the company has some control over the accuracy of the information provided by the system, they should attempt to provide information that the salesforce finds useful. To enure that the proper information is provided, management must seek the user's input about what information should be provided. Additionally, the data should be cleansed and provide an indicator of the probability that a particular lead will result in a sale.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Isabelle Szmigin and Marylyn Carrigan

Focuses on the use and role of older people in advertisements in the UK. Investigates the current situation in the UK with regard to the use of older models, and considers…

Abstract

Focuses on the use and role of older people in advertisements in the UK. Investigates the current situation in the UK with regard to the use of older models, and considers the views of advertising executives in relation to which types of products and services are considered appropriate by advertisers for representation by older people. Using a framework developed in the USA, this initial study which included responses from 19 London agencies found executives were cautious of using models that they considered might alienate the younger audiences for their advertisements. Aims to open a debate which is already well developed in the USA but less so in the UK as to the approach taken towards advertising and older people. In particular it raises the question as to whether this is purely a social issue of discrimination or a broader one of consumer and managerial concern.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Book part
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Jinyan Fan, M. Ronald Buckley and Robert C. Litchfield

Formal orientation programs play a potentially important role in newcomer adjustment, yet research aimed at understanding and improving the effects of these interventions…

Abstract

Formal orientation programs play a potentially important role in newcomer adjustment, yet research aimed at understanding and improving the effects of these interventions has stagnated in recent years. The purpose of this chapter is to facilitate a redirection of researchers’ attention to such programs, and to suggest ways to integrate this body of research with recent developments in socialization and training literatures.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-172-4

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Osmud Rahman and Hong Yu

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of baby boomers’ physiological and psychological needs through clothing consumption.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of baby boomers’ physiological and psychological needs through clothing consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was employed for this study. Data were collected from two generational segments: early baby boomers (1946–1954), and late baby boomers (1955–1964). In total, 13 informants aged from 53 to 71 years were participated in this study. Content analysis and interpretive approach were used for data analysis.

Findings

According to the findings, there are several reasons why the baby boomers shopped for clothing, including a way of stress relief or retail therapy, wardrobe update, replacement of worn-out garments, attractiveness of clothing styles and convenience. Style, fit, comfort and colour were the four most important product evaluative cues. Other than product cues, age appropriateness is an important factor for clothing consumption. Many informants were disappointed with their current body type, shopping experience and the industry offers.

Practical implications

Age-appropriate clothing can give wearers greater self-assurance/-gratification. If fashion designers create their products based on the baby boomers’ cognitive age, it would probably increase their customers’ acceptance and satisfaction.

Originality/value

The rapid growth of the aging population is a global phenomenon. Therefore, investigating the needs and challenges of the baby boomer generation is both timely and imperative. This study intended to offer new knowledge on the issues of baby boomers’ unmet needs, and provide insights and implications to fashion practitioners.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Jaakko Sinisalo, Heikki Karjaluoto and Saila Saraniemi

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers associated with the adoption and use of mobile sales force automation (SFA) systems from a salesperson’s perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers associated with the adoption and use of mobile sales force automation (SFA) systems from a salesperson’s perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative investigation of two business-to-business companies was conducted. Data collected from ten semi-structured interviews with directors or sales managers were analyzed to understand the main barriers to SFA system adoption.

Findings

The study confirms the existence of three barriers (customer knowledge, quality of information and the characteristics of mobile devices) to a mobile SFA system use and identifies two additional barriers: lack of time and optimization issues.

Research limitations/implications

The explorative nature of the study and the qualitative method employed limit the generalizability of the results. The propositions could be further validated and tested with a wider population.

Practical implications

Organizations wishing to speed the adoption of a mobile SFA system should evaluate the importance and significance of the five identified barriers to adoption, and plan how to overcome them. It is important for the providers of the mobile SFA systems to focus on developing systems that can exploit the different characteristics of each channel and, in parallel, overcome the inherent limitations of any single channel. The content of an SFA system should be customizable for each type of mobile device.

Originality/value

Ever increasing mobility has led to a rise in the use of smartphones and tablet PCs (tablets) in business and the consequent growth in the use of SFA systems. Although SFA systems have been studied for roughly 30 years, little is known of the impact of newly developed mobile devices on sales management and sales personnel.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

David J. Good and Robert W. Stone

The variables impacting marketers’ motivation to work smarter are examined. These influencing variables are the manager’s venturesomeness, job challenge, effort and skill…

Abstract

The variables impacting marketers’ motivation to work smarter are examined. These influencing variables are the manager’s venturesomeness, job challenge, effort and skill results, as well as self‐esteem. The model is empirically tested using 273 responses to a questionnaire distributed to marketers using a purchased, national mailing list. The empirical tests were done using a structural equations approach and maximum likelihood estimation. The results indicate that the motivation to work smarter is directly and positively impacted by the manager’s job challenge, effort and skill results, and venturesomeness. The manager’s self‐esteem has positive, indirect impacts on the motivation to work smarter through each of the manager’s venturesomeness, effort and skill results, and job challenge. Based on these results, recommendations on how marketers can be encouraged to work smarter are made.

Details

Participation and Empowerment: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-4449

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