Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

David Butler, Robert Butler, Justin Doran and Sean O’Connor

Growing evidence suggests regional economic factors impact on individual outcomes, such as life expectancy and well-being. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Growing evidence suggests regional economic factors impact on individual outcomes, such as life expectancy and well-being. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact that player-specific and regional differences have on the number of senior international appearances football players accumulate over the course of their careers, for six UEFA member countries, from 1993 to 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs a Poisson regression model to analyse the impact of individual and regional factors on the number of senior international caps a footballer receives over the course of their career.

Findings

The results indicate that both individual and regional variables can explain the number of caps a player receives over the course of their career. The authors find that an individual’s career length positively influences the number of international caps accrued. Players born in wealthier and more populous regions accumulate a greater number of international appearances. Distance from the capital has no effect, however, the number of youth academies in the player’s region of birth has a significant positive effect.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is limited to regional variations within economically developed states. It would be interesting to test whether the correlation between relative regional development and international success exists in less developed countries. The authors only address mens international football in this study and cannot comment on the generality of the findings across genders or sports.

Practical implications

The results can provide insights for local football authorities and policy makers concerned with regional characteristics and those interested in the development of elite talent.

Originality/value

This is the first study to analyse a pan-European data set, using an increasingly adopted econometric method to understanding regional economic development – Poisson modelling.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1964

C. Butler and F. Cork

Progress Made by the Laboratories of Rolls‐Royce Ltd. and Robert Kearsley & Co. in the Formulation and Manufacture of Surface Coatings and the Techniques Used in Applying…

Abstract

Progress Made by the Laboratories of Rolls‐Royce Ltd. and Robert Kearsley & Co. in the Formulation and Manufacture of Surface Coatings and the Techniques Used in Applying these Coatings to Aircraft Engines

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Charles W. Bailey, Jeff Fadell, Judy E. Myers and Thomas C. Wilson

The University of Houston Libraries are developing an expert system to assist library users in selecting appropriate indexes and abstracts to meet their information needs…

Abstract

The University of Houston Libraries are developing an expert system to assist library users in selecting appropriate indexes and abstracts to meet their information needs. This project, which is being conducted by the Intelligent Reference Systems Committee, is the first step in a broader plan to develop reference expert systems.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1906

Although there are contradictory reports in regard to the tinned meat scandal in America, there is not the least doubt that an appalling condition of things prevails, and…

Abstract

Although there are contradictory reports in regard to the tinned meat scandal in America, there is not the least doubt that an appalling condition of things prevails, and to the ordinary person who knows little or nothing of the extent to which food adulteration and other such malpractices exist in this country as well as elsewhere, such revelations as those which have recently been made by the daily press must come as a shock. To those whose duty it is to acquaint themselves with the nature and quality of the food supply of the people, the revelations are not so startling. The layman would hardly believe that the cases of obscure poisoning which repeatedly occur, sometimes resulting in death, and sometimes producing more or less severe attacks of illness, are largely due to the use of bad tinned foods. According to various reports from reliable sources, some of the practices in vogue at the Chicago packing houses are too disgusting to be given publicity to, but the malpractices which have been revealed in connection with the manufacture of tinned meat products, such as the use of diseased carcases, filthy offal and sweepings, putrid and decomposed meat artificially coloured and preserved with boric acid or some other chemical preservative, of potted ham made from mouldy flesh, of sausages made from the sweepings of the packing houses where it is the habit of the employees to expectorate freely on the floor, will tend to make people refuse to purchase any kind of tinned food, and unfortunately the manufacturer of good and wholesome products is sure to suffer. As might have been anticipated, denials as to the allegations made have been put forward and circulated, no doubt at the instance of persons more or less interested in the maintenance of the practices referred to. It has been alleged that protection is afforded to the consumer by certain labels, which read, “Quality Guaranteed, Government Inspected,” but it appears from recent official reports that this statement in reality means nothing at all, and affords no guarantee whatever—which is precisely what we should have expected. The absurdity and criminality of permitting the admixture of chemical preservatives with articles of food are well illustrated by these exposures, and we have more justification than ever in asking that our own Government authorities will make up their minds to take the action which has so long and so forcibly been urged upon them with respect to this form of adulteration.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2009

Daniel Perry

While still early in the 21st century, nations are experiencing an unprecedented rise in people living into their 80s, 90s, and even longer. Many national leaders view…

Abstract

While still early in the 21st century, nations are experiencing an unprecedented rise in people living into their 80s, 90s, and even longer. Many national leaders view with alarm a possible tidal wave of chronic age‐related disease and disability. Competing scenarios predict insurmountable social and economic stress; or alternatively, a future in which older people continue to function and contribute during extended healthy years of life made possible by scientific and medical advances. The latter vision, termed the 'longevity dividend', is discussed in terms of strategies for achieving this goal.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

Renee Feinberg and Rita Auerbach

It is customary these days to denounce our society for its unconscionable neglect of the elderly, while we look back romantically to some indeterminate past when the…

Abstract

It is customary these days to denounce our society for its unconscionable neglect of the elderly, while we look back romantically to some indeterminate past when the elderly were respected and well cared for. Contrary to this popular view, old people historically have enjoyed neither respect nor security. As Simone de Beauvoir so effectively demonstrates in The Coming of Age (New York: Putnam, 1972), the elderly have been almost universally ill‐treated by societies throughout the world. Even the Hebrew patriarchs admonished their children to remember them as they grew older: “Cast me not off in time of old age; when my strength fails, forsake me not” (Psalms 71:1). Primitive agrarian cultures, whose very existence depended upon the knowledge gleaned from experience, valued their elders, but even they were often moved by the harsh conditions of subsistence living to eliminate by ritual killing those who were no longer productive members of society. There was a softening of societal attitudes toward the elderly during the period of nineteenth century industrial capitalism, which again valued experience and entrepreneurial skills. Modern technocratic society, however, discredits the idea that knowledge accumulates with age and prefers to think that it grows out‐of‐date. “The vast majority of mankind,” writes de Beauvoir, “look upon the coming of old age with sorrow and rebellion. It fills them with more aversion than death itself.” That the United States in the twentieth century is not alone in its poor treatment of the aged does not excuse or explain this neglect. Rather, the pervasiveness of prejudice against the old makes it even more imperative that we now develop programs to end age discrimination and its vicious effects.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Ellis Cashmore

Abstract

Details

Kardashian Kulture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-706-7

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

To explore the edges of literature, one must look at contemporary literary reviews and journals. The themes and styles of writing in these reviews and journals reveal new…

Abstract

To explore the edges of literature, one must look at contemporary literary reviews and journals. The themes and styles of writing in these reviews and journals reveal new ideas and trends in the literary community. These edges are often rough and not polished, they may present more extreme points of view or they may introduce new subjects. The latest issue of Ploughshares, a journal of new writing, exemplifies this. The theme of the Winter 1993–94 issue is “Borderlands,” edited by Russell Banks and Chase Twichell. In his introduction, Banks says: “But as Doris Lessing says ‘Things change at the edges,’ and insofar as I myself want things to change, and I do, for this world as presently constituted is intolerable, then my ongoing affection for work written ‘on the edge’ is political. I am still sufficiently optimistic to believe that if enough decent people see how bad things are on the borders, they will begin to change things there…The stories and narratives (include) white voices, black voices, male and female, with narrators speaking African‐American English, Hispanic‐American English, and Anglo‐American English, talking high church and low, downtown and up‐: these are the voices that daily surround us; and because they come to us, not from some dreamed‐of center where no one in America lives anymore, but from the inescapable borderlands, they speak for us all.” Chase Twichell reflects in her introduction on what she looked for in deciding what literature to select for this issue. “In terms of the task of editing, this means I now look hard at poems that carry the flags of outrage and grief, even if their surfaces are ‘rough.’ In fact, I've come to value highly some kinds of roughness because I believe they carry their cargos more honestly, in fact more precisely, by refusing to try to smooth unsmoothable edges.” These thoughts fascinated me and seemed to express the new directions and new ways of looking at literature. Many of the contemporary literary reviews and journals attempt to do just this.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2009

James Goodwin

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Claire Ford

The aim of this paper is to identify the benefits for individuals with dementia from participating in highly creative engagement activities. It also aims to analyse the…

Downloads
467

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to identify the benefits for individuals with dementia from participating in highly creative engagement activities. It also aims to analyse the ways of promoting access for this generation in settings such as museums and galleries, identifying the various ways the USA and UK differ when providing new opportunities for this generation. It also seeks to depict how the USA measures and acknowledges creativity, alongside the decrease of cognitive ability.

Design/methodology/approach

The Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship study was carried out in six cities across the USA; these were Milwaukee, Chicago, Minneapolis, New York, San Francisco and Washington, DC. Data, observations and knowledge were gathered from various access programmes in museums and galleries, creative access organisations and in alternative environments from hospitals, to day centres and residential care.

Findings

This article highlights the benefits of coordinating creative activities within a healthcare setting, looking at ways of changing cultural views and improving the health service.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited to the USA and its six biggest cities. The results presented are predominantly qualitative and the results rely on extensive evaluation.

Practical implications

Collaboration between health staff and artists can prove difficult so it is essential to utilize practitioners that share the same values and visions of the end goal. Both leadership and job roles need to be discussed in great detail before beginning any access project.

Social implications

Arts in a healthcare context will bridge the gap between age and ability, altering the views of today's general culture. Instead the “elderly” will be seen as creative, innovative and pro‐active. The arts can transform the stereotypical views that today's culture have of the elderly, from negative to positive. The arts will inspire intergenerational collaboration between the young and old which will enhance self‐esteem, respect and knowledge for both age groups.

Originality/value

This paper will promote the arts as a positive tool to improve the quality of life for individuals with dementia. Providing guidelines, insight and access programmes to health care staff, carers and individuals with dementia. This information and support will boost dementia care, lowering medical costs and allow for a better environment for the third age to be a part of.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000