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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2021

Robert Bowen

This paper aims to investigate the potential for developing a unique coffee tourism experience in the Eje Cafetero region of Colombia, considering unique local traditions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the potential for developing a unique coffee tourism experience in the Eje Cafetero region of Colombia, considering unique local traditions of coffee production, as well as local tourism infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

With the aim of observing coffee tourism experiences in-place, this paper uses an analytical auto-ethnographic methodology, where the researcher observes the coffee tourism experience, considering both the tourism providers and tourists. This represents an emerging method in tourism research with data collected through a reflective diary and photographic documentation.

Findings

Coffee tourism has already established itself in the Eje Cafetero region, and with increasing tourism in Colombia, there is potential for further interest in coffee tourism in the region. With an established infrastructure and positive reputation for coffee, Colombia is well placed to provide various coffee tourism offerings, including unique experiences based on local traditions.

Originality/value

Coffee tourism is an under-researched area, with few studies based on primary data to understand the potential for coffee tourism experiences. This study advances knowledge on this while also promoting innovative auto-ethnographic research methods. Findings help places understand how to leverage competitive advantage through unique offerings.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Robert Bowen and Sophie Bennett

This paper aims to evaluate how places approach the promotion of local food products and what it means to produce, consume and support local produce in a rural region.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate how places approach the promotion of local food products and what it means to produce, consume and support local produce in a rural region.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a participatory action-reflective approach through a series of three focus groups held over consecutive weeks with nine participants. This included local food producers, artists and community members, with data collected through focus group discussions, reflective video diaries and a questionnaire. The research was conducted in Rhondda Cynon Taf, Wales, a region with entrepreneurial potential but lacking a reputation for food.

Findings

Findings demonstrate confused perceptions of local identity, leading to a clichéd image of the region. As such, an origin brand may do little to enhance the value of local produce or increase economic prosperity in places that lack an established identity. Places with a more recognised reputation for food, such as Wales, could benefit from an origin brand, similar to Brittany.

Originality/value

The study extends the academic understanding of place branding by investigating the value of using origin branding in promoting food products. The context of a lesser-known region highlights the importance of awareness and reputation for the successful implementation of the brand. Additionally, the unique community-led action-reflective methodology provides a holistic model in exploring the effective development of the brand.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Robert Bowen

This study offers a comparative analysis of attitudes to small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) internationalisation in two different cultural settings, Wales and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study offers a comparative analysis of attitudes to small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) internationalisation in two different cultural settings, Wales and Brittany. The purpose of this paper is to conduct an in-depth investigation of attitudes to internationalisation among food and drink SMEs using mixed methods and focussing on both SMEs that internationalise and those that do not. This leads to a more comprehensive understanding of the issues influencing attitudes to SME internationalisation, which could facilitate policy development for such companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods are used in this study to provide a richness of data in investigating this complex issue. The majority of research in this field has focussed on quantitative research, however, this study heeds calls for more plurality in research on SME internationalisation to achieve a more detailed understanding of the issues affecting SME internationalisation. This is achieved through an online questionnaire of 169 food producing SMEs in Wales and Brittany, informed by International Entrepreneurship theory. A second phase of semi-structured interviews provides more context to the questionnaire findings, with 37 interviews conducted with respondents from the questionnaire. Each phase was conducted independently, with findings triangulated for further investigation.

Findings

Companies of all characteristics have the ability to internationalise; however, cultural differences were observed between Wales and Brittany in both attitudes and the conditions for internationalisation. Breton SMEs displayed more proactivity to internationalisation, stemming from more favourable conditions, a greater reputation for food and more confidence. Conversely, Welsh SMEs were more reactive, relying on government support in encouraging internationalisation. Breton SMEs also benefitted from the strong cultural identity of food products, especially through the Produit en Bretagne brand and its network of producers.

Originality/value

The study makes both a theoretical and methodological contribution to research on SME internationalisation. The comparative study of Wales and Brittany is significant in understanding cultural influences to internationalisation in two regions where the food and drink industry represents an important part of the economy. The focus on a single industry is significant in understanding the particularities of internationalisation within an industrial context, as findings from studies across multiple industries are considered less generalisable. A methodological contribution is sought through using mixed methods to provide a more comprehensive study.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2010

Stephen L. Vargo, Robert F. Lusch, Melissa Archpru Akaka and Yi He

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Stefan Michel, David Bowen and Robert Johnston

The keys to effective service recovery are familiar to many throughout industry and academia. Nevertheless, overall customer satisfaction after a failure has not improved…

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Abstract

Purpose

The keys to effective service recovery are familiar to many throughout industry and academia. Nevertheless, overall customer satisfaction after a failure has not improved, and many managers claim their organizations cannot respond to and fix recurring problems quickly enough. Why does service recovery so often fail and what can managers do about it? This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective is to produce an interdisciplinary summary of the growing literature on service recovery, bringing together what each of the author's domain – management, marketing, and human resources management – has to offer. By contrasting those three perspectives using 141 academic sources, nine tensions between customer, process, and employee recovery are discovered.

Findings

It is argued that service recovery often fails due to the unresolved tensions found between the conflicting perspectives of customer recovery, process recovery, and employee recovery. Therefore, successful service recovery requires the integration of these different perspectives. This is summarized in the following definition: “Service recovery are the integrative actions a company takes to re‐establish customer satisfaction and loyalty after a service failure (customer recovery), to ensure that failure incidents encourage learning and process improvement (process recovery) and to train and reward employees for this purpose (employee recovery).”

Practical implications

Managers are not advised to directly address and solve the nine tensions between customer recovery, process recovery, and employee recovery. Instead, concentrating on the underlying cause of these tensions is recommended. That is, managers should strive to integrate service recovery efforts based upon a “service logic”; a balance of functional subcultures; strategy‐driven resolution of functional differences; data‐based decision making from the seamless collection and sharing of information; recovery metrics and rewards; and development of “T‐shaped” employees with a service, not just functional, mindset.

Originality/value

This paper provides an interdisciplinary view of the difficulties to implement a successful service recovery management. The contribution is twofold. First, specific tensions between customer, process and employee recovery are identified. Second, managers are offered recommendations of how to integrate the diverging perspectives.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Christabel Man‐Fong Ho

Managing ethics has come to be considered a management discipline, especially since the birth of business ethics and social responsibility movements in the 1960s. However…

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8987

Abstract

Purpose

Managing ethics has come to be considered a management discipline, especially since the birth of business ethics and social responsibility movements in the 1960s. However, there seems to be no comprehensive review and synthesis of ethics management literature in construction. This research aims to address the theory‐practice gap by providing a critical review of the ethics decision‐making literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines critically the ethics decision‐making literature from the 1980s to 2008.

Findings

Three research focuses, relating to the construction industry in ethical decision making, are identified: empirical studies on examining the associations between variables (individuals, situational/organisational, moral intensity) and employees' ethical behaviour in construction organisational contexts; continuous application of behavioural science theories to develop an appropriate ethical decision‐making model for the industry; and research on group and/or organisational level behaviour ethics.

Research limitations/implications

The study identifies, draws together, and integrates existing theories and research, with a particular emphasis on ethical decision‐making models, to present the key contributions in the realm of ethics decision making.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the role of management (both as an academic discipline and from a practitioner perspective) in bridging this gap.

Originality/value

The research adds value to the literature on ethics management, where limited knowledge exists in the construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Gary C. Biddle, Robert M. Bowen and James S. Wallace

Traces the growth in the use of economic value added (EVA, previously known as residual income) and uses two previous research studies to assess some claims for its…

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3316

Abstract

Traces the growth in the use of economic value added (EVA, previously known as residual income) and uses two previous research studies to assess some claims for its merits. Compares EVA’s ability to explain stock returns with that of earnings before extraordinary items (EBEI) and cash flow using 1984‐1993 US data; and finds EBEI is most closely related. Examines EVA’s incentive effects on management investing, financing and operating decisions and shows that, although EVA users decreased new investment, increased dispositions of assets, increased share repurchases, used assets more intensively and increased residual income, market reactions to this were weak. Suggests possible reasons for this and concludes that EVA may align management incentives with shareholders’ interests but this does not necessarily increase shareholder value.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Hasan Cinnioğlu

The current Industry 4.0 era is considered not only as a process that dominates technological developments but also as a process that influences the leadership styles…

Abstract

The current Industry 4.0 era is considered not only as a process that dominates technological developments but also as a process that influences the leadership styles. Management 4.0 is essential for businesses to find and apply the appropriate technologies in the age of Industry 4.0. The leadership styles that business managers will adopt in order to be successful in this process and to survive in an intensely competitive environment can play an important role. At this point, a significant problem arises: identifying leadership styles that will bring success. In this context, the primary purpose of this chapter is to explain the modern leadership styles that business managers can adopt or follow in the age of Industry 4.0. In line with this purpose, the chapter first describes the historical development of leadership, leadership theories and modern leadership styles, such as transactional, transformational, technological, strategic, visionary and agile leadership, and all these concepts are discussed based on the Industry 4.0 perspective.

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Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Abstract

Details

Tourism Microentrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-463-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

David A. Hales

Despite widespread interest in the resources and people of Alaska, few libraries outside of the state maintain extensive collections on these subjects. In this article…

Abstract

Despite widespread interest in the resources and people of Alaska, few libraries outside of the state maintain extensive collections on these subjects. In this article, David A. Hales reviews a multifarious sample of informative materials.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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