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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2022

Tony Wohlers and Amy Fletcher

Abstract

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Biopolitics at 50 Years
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-108-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2017

Robert Barner and Ken Ideus

Abstract

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Working Deeply
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-424-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2017

Robert Barner and Ken Ideus

Abstract

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Working Deeply
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-424-8

Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2013

Robert W. Barner and Charlotte P. Barner

The concepts of “mindfulness” and “transformational learning” arise from several domains (i.e., traditional and positive psychology, organizational and social sciences, human and…

Abstract

The concepts of “mindfulness” and “transformational learning” arise from several domains (i.e., traditional and positive psychology, organizational and social sciences, human and organizational learning and development) and are researched within numerous contexts. Given the need to be sensitive to the complexities of multiple levels for analyses (Hitt, Beamish, Jackson, & Mathieu, 2007), our discussion of individual mindfulness in organizations is centered on the micro level of analysis. This construct of individual mindfulness differs from two constructs at the macro, or organizational, level of analysis: “collective mindfulness” – the practices and processes high-reliability organizations employ to increase organizational reliability – and “mindful organizing” (Langer, 2000; Weick & Putman, 2006; Weick & Roberts, 1993; Weick & Sutcliffe, 2007; Weick, Sutcliffe, & Obstfeld, 2002).

Details

Advances in Positive Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-000-1

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Robert Barner

The purpose of this article is to provide readers with an understanding of how the assessment protocol for executive coaching can be adapted to more effectively meet the different…

2768

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide readers with an understanding of how the assessment protocol for executive coaching can be adapted to more effectively meet the different needs of clients who are seeking developmental, transitional, or remedial coaching.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on the author's 20 years of experience as both an internal executive coach and external consultant. Organizational examples are provided to illustrate key concepts.

Findings

The assessment interview can be customized to meet the unique requirements of transitional, developmental, and remedial coaching.

Practical implications

The article provides readers with clear guidelines for adapting the assessment process to meet three different coaching requirements. By following these guidelines, coaches will be able to obtain more detailed and relevant background information on the client's history, organizational setting, goals, and development issues, and in so doing establish a more effective pathway for the coaching intervention.

Originality/value

To the author's knowledge, this article represents the first attempt to consider how assessment interviews might be adapted to the unique requirements of developmental, transitional, and remedial coaching.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2017

Robert Barner and Ken Ideus

Abstract

Details

Working Deeply
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-424-8

Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2017

Robert Barner and Ken Ideus

Abstract

Details

Working Deeply
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-424-8

Abstract

Details

Working Deeply
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-424-8

Abstract

Details

Working Deeply
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-424-8

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Robert Barner

To provide a descriptive case study showing how the construction of drawings as visual metaphors can help work groups “give voice” to their emotional reactions to organizational…

2574

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a descriptive case study showing how the construction of drawings as visual metaphors can help work groups “give voice” to their emotional reactions to organizational change events, and provide groups with a vehicle for interpreting and framing their experience of organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

A seven‐person focus was asked to construct a drawing that would serve as a visual metaphor for conveying the group's reaction to ongoing organizational changes within their company. Following this construction, the group engaged in a self‐interpretation of their metaphor.

Findings

The work group's feelings regarding organizational change were encapsulated in visual metaphor of “dark tower”; a metaphor of which revealed that team members shared several strong, negative emotions regarding the organizational change event. A review of how the group's changes in metaphor construction evolved over three successive drawings showed how certain elements of the metaphor came to play a central role in the team's emotional expression of organizational change events.

Research limitations/implications

This case study did not attempt to provide a comparative review of metaphor constructions across work groups, nor did it include the use of other research methods, such as structured interviews, to confirm these findings.

Practical implications

This study illustrates how the construction of visual metaphors can be used to help researchers gain a more in‐depth understanding of the subjective, felt experience of groups during organizational change events.

Originality/value

The group's reflections on how their successive drawings changed over the course of the construction of their metaphor sheds light on how “visual narratives” take form over time.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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