Search results

1 – 10 of 28
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

David Smallbone, Salinder Supri and Robert Baldock

Investigates the implications of digital technology for the skill and training needs of small printing firms. The picture that emerges is one where the emphasis is on…

Abstract

Investigates the implications of digital technology for the skill and training needs of small printing firms. The picture that emerges is one where the emphasis is on re‐training due to technological change. The bulk of this training takes place in the workplace, with initial training typically being supplied by an equipment or software supplier as part of the initial purchase package. The skills gained by the key workers selected for initial training are then passed on informally to other staff in the firm. There is rarely a high level of commitment or a systematic approach to training that might be expected given the scale of the investment costs that many of these firms have incurred. Only a few proactively‐managed small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises are recognising the need to constantly update their workforce skills.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

David Smallbone, Robert Baldock and Mike Bridge

This paper reviews the first year experience of a programme (Backing Winners), launched by North Yorkshire TEC in 1995 to provide support for new and young businesses with…

Abstract

This paper reviews the first year experience of a programme (Backing Winners), launched by North Yorkshire TEC in 1995 to provide support for new and young businesses with growth potential. The Backing Winners (BW) programme differs from previous schemes in that it is not restricted to clients who are unemployed, it provides access to some key business services (such as office services), and there is no grant offered to individual businesses. Delivery of BW is focused on Personal Business Mentors (PBMs) whose role is similar to that of the PBA in Business Links. Based on a survey of 144 clients businesses and interviews with representatives of each of the Enterprise Agencies (EAs) contracted to deliver BW, the conclusion is that it was successful during the first year of its operation. Clients were very satisfied with their PBMs and some were active users of group training and office services. The paper also considers a number of policy issues raised by the study. These include broad issues such as the extent to which there is a case for targeting support on new and young firms such as these, and the extent to which the operation of a selective approach at the start‐up stage involves “picking winners”. In addition, BW raises a number of delivery issues which include: the need for adequate resourcing to enable the workload of PBMs (or PBAs) to be compatible with effective delivery; the need to reconsider the use of freelance consultants as PBMs (or PBAs); the need to recognise that many small manufacturing firms have sector‐specific support requirements; the need to set performance targets to agencies contracted to deliver such programmes, which recognise differences between agencies and their catchments.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Robert Baldock, David North and Farid Ullah

This chapter presents research to assess the impact of the recent financial crisis on technology-based small firms (TBSFs) in the United Kingdom based on findings from an…

Abstract

This chapter presents research to assess the impact of the recent financial crisis on technology-based small firms (TBSFs) in the United Kingdom based on findings from an extended telephone survey with the owner-managers of 49 young and 51 more mature TBSFs, undertaken in 2010. Even before the onset of the global financial crisis in 2007, it was generally acknowledged that TBSFs faced greater obstacles in accessing finance than conventional SMEs. This is because banks have difficulty assessing the viability of new technology-based business ventures due to information asymmetries, whilst risk capital providers may have difficulty providing appropriate or sufficient funds on terms acceptable to entrepreneurs. Given the recent difficulties that SMEs, in general, have faced in obtaining external finance, we would expect TBSFs to have been particularly adversely affected by the financial crisis. Our evidence showed that TBSFs exhibited a strong demand for external finance between 2007 and 2010, related to their growth ambitions and achievements. They sought finance mainly from banks but also with younger TBSFs seeking business angel finance and more mature TBSFs seeking venture capital finance. However, our evidence indicates that both debt and equity finance became harder to access for TBSFs, particularly for early-stage and more R&D-intensive firms. Where funding was offered, it was often on unacceptable terms with regards to the levels of collateral or equity required. The chapter provides evidence of a growing funding gap and concludes that the ability of TBSFs to contribute to economic recovery is hampered by ongoing problems in obtaining external finance.

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-032-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Robert Baldock and David Smallbone

This paper presents findings from recent research undertaken into the characteristics and support needs of ethnic minority owned businesses (EMBs) in Devon and Cornwall…

Abstract

This paper presents findings from recent research undertaken into the characteristics and support needs of ethnic minority owned businesses (EMBs) in Devon and Cornwall. The study was commissioned by PROSPER (formerly Devon and Cornwall TEC and Business Link), in collaboration with the Rural Race Equality Project in South West England. EMBs have been the subject of growing interest from a variety of sources in recent years, generating considerable debate about their distinctiveness in comparison with other small firms and their needs in terms of public policy. Not surprisingly, perhaps, a great deal of this research has focused on areas where EMBs are concentrated, such as London and Birmingham. In contrast, this research focuses on EMBs in an area which is some distance from the main centres of EMB concentration and where the ethnic minority population is more dispersed, many in a rural context.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-032-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

The whole kingdom from north to south at the time of writing is enveloped in freezing Arctic weather, reminiscent of the North Russian campaign of long ago. The normal…

Abstract

The whole kingdom from north to south at the time of writing is enveloped in freezing Arctic weather, reminiscent of the North Russian campaign of long ago. The normal winter is relatively mild, mainly a Westerly pattern, occasionally wild and windy, wet with a rare cold “snap”. There are variations in the pattern, damp and warm in the south‐west, few frosts and rarely any snow; in the north of the country, Scotland, much colder, with the south‐east partaking of the weather pattern of the land mass of the Continent. The variations appear more of the mild weather in the South and colder, appreciably, in the North; recalling service personnel stationed at Gosport who did not need an overcoat all winter, whereas in the North, many found it necessary to wear a light overcoat tor most of the year, the south‐east corner of England, obtaining no help from the warming Gulf Stream, often gets the worst of the weather, which it has done to a very considerable extent in this winter.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 87 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Book part

Oliver Mallett

This chapter examines the interactions of formal and informal forms of small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) business support, characterised as interactions within an…

Abstract

This chapter examines the interactions of formal and informal forms of small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) business support, characterised as interactions within an ‘enterprise industry’. An analysis of the interactions revealed in the existing literature for different forms of business support develops a new conceptual framework for understanding those varied forms of external influence targeted at SMEs that constitute and extend a ‘patchwork quilt’ of provision. This chapter focusses on how different forms of support and advice interact, the centrality of state influence and how such interactions can be considered part of a firm’s regulatory context. This conceptualisation allows the consideration of both business support and state regulations to move beyond conceptions of positive or negative impacts on factors such as firm growth. Instead, it establishes a conceptual lens for considering how the different forms of external influence can shape the practices and attitudes of SMEs and their owner-managers. Policy makers and organisations within the enterprise industry seeking to develop effective forms of support or regulation should not consider such activities in isolation or in simple, decontextualised positive or negative terms.

Details

Creating Entrepreneurial Space: Talking Through Multi-Voices, Reflections on Emerging Debates
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-577-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

The question of Britain's entry into the Common Market would appear to have been resolved. For a time it did seem as if the Government was looking before it leapt, but if…

Abstract

The question of Britain's entry into the Common Market would appear to have been resolved. For a time it did seem as if the Government was looking before it leapt, but if we can read the signs aright, only the controversy now remains. The implications of the Common Market, both political and economic, are largely unknown to the public and if recent events among French farmers are an indication, are not entirely acceptable to those already in it.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 63 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Jacques Defourny and Victor Pestoff

There is still no universal definition of the third sector in Europe, but it can be seen as including all types of non-governmental not-for-profit entities such as…

Abstract

There is still no universal definition of the third sector in Europe, but it can be seen as including all types of non-governmental not-for-profit entities such as non-profit organizations, mutuals, cooperatives, social enterprises and foundations. This article attempts to make sense of the current shifting conceptualization of the third sector in Europe. It is based on short country summaries of the images and concepts of the third sector in 13 European countries by EMES Network’s members, first presented in 2008 (Defourny and Pestoff, 2008; nine of them were recently revised and are found in the appendix to this article.). The perception and development of the third sector in Europe is closely related to the other major social governance institutions/mechanisms, like the market, state and community and through the third sector’s interaction with them. Moreover, many third sector organizations (TSOs) overlap with these other social institutions, resulting in varying degrees of hybridity and internal tensions experienced by them. TSOs can generate resources from their activities on the market, by providing services in partnership with the state and/or by promoting the interests of a given community or group. The country overviews document a growing professionalization of TSOs in most countries and a growing dependency of public funds to provide services. This has important theoretical and practical implications for orienting the articles included in this book. Thus, it can provide a key for better understanding the discussion and analysis in the remainder of this volume.

Details

Accountability and Social Accounting for Social and Non-Profit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-004-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

The latest information from the magazine chemist is extremely valuable. He has dealt with milk‐adulteration and how it is done. His advice, if followed, might, however…

Abstract

The latest information from the magazine chemist is extremely valuable. He has dealt with milk‐adulteration and how it is done. His advice, if followed, might, however, speedily bring the manipulating dealer before a magistrate, since the learned writer's recipe is to take a milk having a specific gravity of 1030, and skim it until the gravity is raised to 1036; then add 20 per cent. of water, so that the gravity may be reduced to 1030, and the thing is done. The advice to serve as “fresh from the cow,” preferably in a well‐battered milk‐measure, might perhaps have been added to this analytical gem.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

1 – 10 of 28