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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2020

Rick Colbourne, Peter Moroz, Craig Hall, Kelly Lendsay and Robert B. Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to explore Indigenous Works’ efforts to facilitate Indigenous-led research that is responsive to the socio-economic needs, values and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore Indigenous Works’ efforts to facilitate Indigenous-led research that is responsive to the socio-economic needs, values and traditions of Indigenous communities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is grounded in an Indigenous research paradigm that is facilitated by Indigenous-led community-based participatory action research (PAR) methodology informed by the Two Row Wampum and Two-Eyed Seeing framework to bridge Indigenous science and knowledge systems with western ones.

Findings

The findings point to the need for greater focus on how Indigenous and western knowledge may be aligned within the methodological content domain while tackling a wide array of Indigenous research goals that involve non-Indigenous allies.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the need to develop insights and understandings into how to develop a safe, ethical space for Indigenous-led trans-disciplinary and multi-community collaborative research partnerships that contribute to community self-governance and well-being.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2006

Ana María Peredo and Robert B. Anderson

Early on it was recognized that this broad concept of entrepreneurship could be used to understand and improve the condition of particular disadvantaged populations; the…

Abstract

Early on it was recognized that this broad concept of entrepreneurship could be used to understand and improve the condition of particular disadvantaged populations; the so-called “under-developed” communities and regions (e.g. Danson, 1995). Only recently, however, has the notion been applied by scholars of entrepreneurship to a particular sector within this category, to the indigenous populations of the world.

Details

Developmental Entrepreneurship: Adversity, Risk, and Isolation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-452-2

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2003

Robert B Anderson and Robert J Giberson

This chapter explores economic development and entrepreneurship among Aboriginal1 people in Canada as a particular instance of Indigenous entrepreneurship and development…

Abstract

This chapter explores economic development and entrepreneurship among Aboriginal1 people in Canada as a particular instance of Indigenous entrepreneurship and development activity worldwide. In turn, Indigenous entrepreneurship, and the economic development that flows from it, can be considered a particular sub-set of ethnic entrepreneurship. What makes Indigenous entrepreneurship a particular and distinct instance of ethic entrepreneurship is the strong tie between the process and place – the historic lands of the particular Indigenous group involved. With Aboriginal populations there is also often a strong component of “nation-building,” or more correctly re-building. This is in contrast with instances of entrepreneurship associated with ethnic groups that have migrated to new places and are pursuing economic opportunities there in ways that distinguish them from the non-ethnic population.

Details

Ethnic Entrepreneurship: Structure and Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-220-7

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Tomi Ovaska, Louw Van der Walt and Robert B. Anderson

The purpose of this study is to focus on the development experience in the global world of two small communities, Viimsi in Estonia and Magog in South Africa. These two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to focus on the development experience in the global world of two small communities, Viimsi in Estonia and Magog in South Africa. These two communities were chosen as exemplars because the authors were familiar with both, and understood them to be illustrative of differing outcomes of interaction of small communities with the global economy offering the prospect of generalisation of findings to the framework and theory. Twenty years ago, both were poor, since then Viimsi has become wealthy, while Magopa remains poor. It is not believed that becoming the wealthiest community in Estonia was Viimsi’s per-determined destiny. What people of Viimsi did to make their community a success relative to the surrounding peer communities is a story of the visible as much as the invisible attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

These attributes are examined using a framework the authors’ originally developed to explore the participation of Indigenous communities in the global economy in pursuit of development as they defined it. A thorough investigation was done on the interactions among various community stakeholder groups in an attempt to describe the social fabric of these two communities, and this was used to explain why Viimsi was able to take advantage of globalisation, when Magopa was not.

Findings

While it will be hard, no doubt, to translate all the success attributes of Viimsi to a different location and time, some of the lessons that were uncovered from the study are universal in nature, making them potentially useable for other small communities trying to find their way in the global world.

Research limitations/implications

Studying only two communities means that the generalisation of the findings is limited to theory. None can be made directly to the population of similar communities, except indirectly through exploration using the theory being developed to test its validity in other circumstances.

Practical implications

The findings from this paper will increase the understanding of the factors that contribute the a community’s success of lack of, in participating in the global economy.

Originality/value

This is an under-researched area within development literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Tomi Ovaska and Robert B. Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to present a qualitative study of economic development attempts to uncover the critical factors behind the recent economic rise of Viimsi…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a qualitative study of economic development attempts to uncover the critical factors behind the recent economic rise of Viimsi, Estonia, to that of the wealthiest community in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

The roles of and interactions among various community stakeholder groups are explored through two sets of resident surveys. From these surveys, and a rich set of secondary material, a narrative emerges as to the factors behind Viimsi's success since 1991, when Estonia regained its independence from the former Soviet Union and its system of economic central planning.

Findings

It was found that among the key components explaining why Viimsi has become the wealthiest community in Estonia are its extraordinary openness in embracing the market system, combined with a consensus‐based plan among community stakeholders on balanced development, a dependable government, and a level of solidarity among fellow residents in facing change.

Originality/value

This paper describes one small community's experience in the global world, and offers observations on successful strategies for a community navigating in it.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Meghna Chhabra, Léo‐Paul Dana, Veland Ramadani and Monika Agarwal

This paper aims to examine the pattern of publications, using a bibliometric analysis of the Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the pattern of publications, using a bibliometric analysis of the Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy (JEC) for the period between 2007 and 2021.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses relevant bibliometric metrics and procedures. The analysis covers mainly the number of articles published in JEC, most influential years in terms of the number of publications and citations, top productive countries, most prolific authors, most influential institutions, funding institutions, co-authorship trends, keywords co-occurrence, and vital themes of JEC articles between 2007 and 2021.

Findings

The journal’s influential impact in terms of citations has increased over time, with 83.62% of the published works receiving at least one citation. Léo-Paul Dana has been recognised as the most prolific author by virtue of his contribution of articles in JEC, and the maximum contribution to JEC comes from the USA, followed by Canada and the UK. University of Canterbury, New Zealand and La Trobe University, Australia were the leading contributing institutions. The study identified “indigenous entrepreneurs”, “gender”, “social entrepreneurship”, “education” and “innovation” as contemporary keywords in the study of enterprising communities. These issues present a clear opportunity for research-related topics for the JEC.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first comprehensive piece in the journal’s history that provides a general overview of the journal's major trends and researchers.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Aldene H. Meis Mason, Robert B. Anderson and Leo‐Paul Dana

This case study aims to explore the affect of Canadian Inuit culture on recognizing opportunities from caribou when participating in the bio economy and decision making…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to explore the affect of Canadian Inuit culture on recognizing opportunities from caribou when participating in the bio economy and decision making and benefit sharing considerations for Inuit partnerships arsing from the northern bioeconomy.

Design/methodology/approach

This Inuit case study in northern Canada combined Elder interviews, a focus group and product elicitation techniques. First, the Inuit identified traditional uses of caribou for health care. Second, they explored its potential uses for biomedicines, nutraceuticals and functional foods. Third, they discussed partnerships for development and benefits that should result.

Findings

Inuit had the right to develop and sell caribou products. Decisions about products and processes should be up to the community. Ensuring food security was critical. They preferred partnering with Inuit and northern businesses and government. University and business partnerships needed to provide ongoing monetary and non‐monetary benefits such as employment, new skills and knowledge, and networks.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions based on one case study need to be confirmed by surveying other Inuit communities. Future research should also include Inuit youth.

Practical implications

This research provides an increased understanding of the commons, the use of traditional resources, food security and the interaction of Indigenous culture on opportunity recognition for policy makers, businesses, indigenous communities, and university researchers.

Originality/value

This research paper integrates commons, indigenous entrepreneurship, opportunity recognition and bioeconomy. Furthermore, it provides the Inuit with a voice which they feel has been lacking in the business literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Leo‐Paul Dana, Aldene Meis‐Mason and Robert B. Anderson

To learn how Inuvialuit people feel about the oil and gas activities on their land.

Abstract

Purpose

To learn how Inuvialuit people feel about the oil and gas activities on their land.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were administered to a stratified sample, on Inuvialuit land. Participants included: Inuvialuit elders; entrepreneurs; public servants; employees of the private sector; managers of oil companies; unemployed persons; housewives; the mayor of Inuvik; and the first aboriginal woman leader in Canada.

Findings

It was reported that oil and gas industry activities are having a positive impact on the regional economy, creating indirect as well as direct financial benefits for the Inuvialuit among others. However, some residents qualified their support saying that they are in favour of continued activity only if benefits filter to them as opposed to being enjoyed only by oil companies and migrant employees. Concern was also expressed for the environment and for the threat that development brings to wildlife upon which people rely on as a food source.

Research limitations/implications

This study should have a longitudinal follow‐up.

Practical implications

While oil and gas exploration and the building of a pipeline may have economic advantages, this might have social, cultural and environment costs for the Inuvialuit.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates how oil and gas activities on Inuvialuit land will transform the lives of these people.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2003

Abstract

Details

Ethnic Entrepreneurship: Structure and Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-220-7

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2003

Abstract

Details

Ethnic Entrepreneurship: Structure and Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-220-7

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