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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Kirsten Jane Robertson, Robert Aitken, Maree Thyne and Leah Watkins

This paper aims to explore the correlates of parental mediation of pre-schoolers’ television advertising exposure, focusing on the influence of other siblings in the home.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the correlates of parental mediation of pre-schoolers’ television advertising exposure, focusing on the influence of other siblings in the home.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 486 parents of pre-schoolers. A cross-sectional design involving a quantitative online survey measured the number and age of children in the home, parents’ mediation styles and advertising attitudes, parents’ levels of education and pre-schoolers’ television exposure.

Findings

Co-viewing was the most frequent viewing experience followed by instructive and restrictive mediation. A univariate analysis revealed that parental education and negative attitudes towards advertising were associated with less viewing time for pre-schoolers, although the presence of other siblings mediated this relationship. Logistic regression revealed mediation styles were associated with parental education, attitudes towards advertising, viewing time and the presence of other siblings. Pre-schoolers with an older sibling were less likely to experience co-viewing and more likely to experience instructive mediation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings revealed that parents of pre-schoolers are concerned about advertising to children and actively mediate their child’s exposure. Parental attitudes and education, and sibling composition influence pre-schoolers’ television consumption, and pre-schoolers with an older sibling might be most vulnerable to negative media effects. The sample was limited to primarily higher educated parents and might not generalize.

Originality/value

The study extends the field by focusing on pre-schoolers and provides novel insights into the influence of sibling composition on television consumption.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Leah Watkins, Robert Aitken, Maree Thyne, Kirsten Robertson and Dina Borzekowski

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors influencing young children’s (aged three to five years) understanding of brand symbolism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors influencing young children’s (aged three to five years) understanding of brand symbolism.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple hierarchical regression was used to analyse the relationships between age, gender and environmental factors, including family and the media, on the development of brand symbolism in pre-school children based on 56 children and parent dyad interviews.

Findings

Results confirmed the primary influence of age, television exposure and parental communication style on three to five-year-old children’s understanding of brand symbolism. The study demonstrates that the tendency to infer symbolic user attributes and non-product-related associations with brands starts as early as two years, and increases with age throughout the pre-school years. Children exposed to more television and less critical parental consumer socialisation strategies are more likely to prefer branded products, believe that brands are better quality and that they make people happy and popular.

Social implications

Identifying the factors that influence the development of symbolic brand associations in pre-school children provides an important contribution to public policy discussions on the impact of marketing to young children.

Originality/value

The paper extends existing research by considering, for the first time, the role of environmental factors in pre-schooler’s understanding of brand symbolism. The results provide a more informed basis for discussion about the impact of marketing messages on very young children and the environmental factors that may lead to a more critical engagement with brands.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Aisha Wood Boulanouar, Robert Aitken, Zakaria Boulanouar and Sarah Jane Todd

The purpose of this paper is to improve the quality and efficacy of data collected from Muslim respondents, particularly women, through an examination of Islamic teachings…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the quality and efficacy of data collected from Muslim respondents, particularly women, through an examination of Islamic teachings and illustrated using a “conservative” paradigm of practice. The paper is designed to be helpful to researchers in designing both their projects and their data collection methods.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual, in that it provides an overview of some important, often overlooked or misunderstood areas on which studies have been based and gives frameworks and also ethical pointers to researchers.

Findings

Framed to explain approaches to “conservative” Muslim women in societies across the globe, what is presented herein allows insight into all varieties of Muslim practice. This is achieved by explaining the possible objections to different methodologies and techniques of research for Muslim women at the “conservative” end of the practicing spectrum – this allowing a highlighting of ideas and ideals applicable across the spectrum.

Practical implications

Useful for academic researchers and also commercial researchers, potentially saving both time and money by pointing out possible errors in research design while also ensuring good ethical practice. The paper is offered to assist researchers in eliciting full and frank responses from Muslim respondents based on informed and thoughtful research design and data collection and providing possibly contextualisation(s) of what is said to enhance data analysis and interpretation.

Originality/value

Believed to be the first paper of its kind in English, this conceptual paper provides insight for researchers aiming to get the most useful and ethically sound outcomes for those interviewed, as well as those interviewing.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

R. Aitken‐Sykes

Explains the 1987 Report by the Law Commission on combinedownership of land and blocks of flats. Concludes that the Reportaddresses current (1993) unfair situations. Urges…

Abstract

Explains the 1987 Report by the Law Commission on combined ownership of land and blocks of flats. Concludes that the Report addresses current (1993) unfair situations. Urges that there must be impetus to adopt the Report. Fears that the issue has been “placed on the back burner”.

Details

Property Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

R. Aitken‐Sykes

Examines the effect of the 1980 Right to Buy legislation on localauthority housing departments′ service charges collection. Considersoutline procedures of the statutory…

Abstract

Examines the effect of the 1980 Right to Buy legislation on local authority housing departments′ service charges collection. Considers outline procedures of the statutory code, leases, estimates and consultation, direct works departments, fees, charging areas, insurances, auditing, and service charges held in trust. Concludes that local authority departments should be aware of their obligations to a growing percentage of their housing stock, since it has a duty of care.

Details

Property Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

R. Aitken‐Sykes

Highlights important policy issues in respect of the proposedcommonhold system, and how it may affect long leaseholders andlandlords/freeholders. Discusses the College of…

Abstract

Highlights important policy issues in respect of the proposed commonhold system, and how it may affect long leaseholders and landlords/freeholders. Discusses the College of Estate Management Report 1990, and parts I to IV of the Lord Chancellor′s Consultation Paper on commonhold. Sets out the method, and systems to form and control commonholds, and the mechanism to wind‐up commonholds where required.

Details

Property Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Robert Aitken

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

David Ballantyne and Robert Aitken

This paper aims to explore how the service‐dominant (S‐D) logic of marketing proposed by Vargo and Lusch impacts on business‐to‐business branding concepts and practice.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how the service‐dominant (S‐D) logic of marketing proposed by Vargo and Lusch impacts on business‐to‐business branding concepts and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Vargo and Lusch argue that service interaction comes from goods‐in‐use as well as from interactions between a buyer and a supplier. Their key concepts are examined and the branding literature critically compared.

Findings

Goods become service appliances. Buyer judgments about the value‐in‐use of goods extends the time‐logic of marketing. The exchange concept is no longer transaction bound. Service‐ability (the capability to serve) becomes the essence of a firm's value propositions. Service experience becomes paramount in developing and sustaining the life of a brand.

Research limitations/implications

S‐D logic highlights the need for rigour and clarity in the use of the term “brand”. It also opens up for consideration a variety of previously unexplored contact points in the customer service cycle, expanded to include customer assessments of value‐in‐use.

Practical implications

S‐D logic encourages extending brand strategies into a wider variety of communicative interaction modes.

Originality/value

Some of the issues raised are not new but currently compete for attention in the shadow of media‐dominant approaches to branding.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2014

Prabash Edirisingha, Robert Aitken and Shelagh Ferguson

In this paper, we provide a practical example of how ethnographic insight is obtained in the field. In so doing, we demonstrate multiple ways in which ethnographic…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, we provide a practical example of how ethnographic insight is obtained in the field. In so doing, we demonstrate multiple ways in which ethnographic approaches can be adapted during on-going research processes to develop rich and multiple emic/etic perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based upon the first author’s reflective experience of undertaking ethnographic field work. The discussion draws from a multi-method, longitudinal and adaptive ethnographic research design, which aimed to capture the process of new family identity formation in Sri Lanka.

Originality/value

Existing research gives us excellent insight into various methods used in contemporary ethnographic research and the kinds of insight generated by these methods. With few exceptions, these studies do not give significant insight into the specifics of the ethnographic research process and the adaption practice. Thus, we provide a practical example of how ethnographic insight is obtained in the research field.

Discussion/findings

Our discussion elaborates the ways in which we integrated multiple research methods such as participant observations, semi-structured in-depth interviews, informal sessions, Facebook interactions, adaptations of performative exercises and elicitation methods to overcome complexities in cultural, mundane and personal consumption meanings. We also discuss how closer friendships with informants emerged as a consequence of the ethnographic research adaption practice and how this influenced trust and confidence in researcher-informant relationship, presenting us with a privileged access to their everyday and personal lives.

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