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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Relinde De Koeijer, Jaap Paauwe, Robbert Huijsman and Mathilde Strating

This study aims to examine the effect of human resource management (HRM) in mitigating negative effects of Lean management and Six Sigma (LM&SS) on employee well-being in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of human resource management (HRM) in mitigating negative effects of Lean management and Six Sigma (LM&SS) on employee well-being in health care. The authors subdivide well-being into three components: happiness, trust and health.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional, multisite survey study in internal service units of hospitals. Data analyzed using multivariate regression come from a sample of 1,886 survey respondents (42 units, N = 218 supervisors, N = 1,668 employees) in eight Dutch academic hospitals that have implemented LM&SS.

Findings

The present study findings show no or weak effects of LM&SS on the happiness and health component of employee well-being. In addition, the authors found a significant but weak direct positive effect (ß = 0.07) of the LM&SS bundle on the trusting relationships component of well-being. Therefore, moderating effects of HRM practices on the relationship between LM&SS and employee well-being seem less relevant because an existing relationship between LM&SS and employee well-being is a prerequisite for moderation (Hayes, 2009). There were unexpected side effects. Inspired by research that discusses direct effects of HRM on employee well-being, the authors tested this relationship and found that HRM has a direct positive effect on trust and happiness of employees in health care. For the health component of well-being, the present results show a weak negative effect of HRM.

Practical implications

This study results in a cautiously optimistic view about LM&SS in health care, provided that it is applied in a targeted manner (to improve the performance of their processes) and that HRM is strategically aligned with the goals of LM&SS to improve employees’ happiness and trusting relationships.

Originality/value

Unique features of the study are the focus on the consequences for employees’ well-being related to LM&SS in health care, the role of HRM in regard to this relationship and the participation of all eight Dutch academic hospitals in this research.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Jan de Vries and Robbert Huijsman

This paper seeks to concentrate on the question whether any parallels can be found between the industrial sector and health care services with respect to the developments…

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14140

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to concentrate on the question whether any parallels can be found between the industrial sector and health care services with respect to the developments that have taken place in the area of Supply Chain Management. Starting from an analysis of existing literature, it is intended that different modes of Supply Chain integration will be discussed. Also, in doing so, it is intended that the lessons learned from the studies presented in this special issue will be summarized and placed into the perspective of future research that can be considered as necessary.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopted an exploratory, qualitative approach based on an analysis of existing literature in the area of Supply Chain Management in Health Services. Additionally, material from the case studies presented in this special issue is used to assess the current body of knowledge regarding Supply Chain Management in Health Services.

Findings

Starting from a classification of existing research, five main research areas with respect to Supply Chain Management in a health care setting are defined. Additionally, it is concluded that next to studies with a mono‐disciplinary focus, an interdisciplinary focus on Supply Chain Management issues in health services seems to be necessary.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to both the supply chain management literature and literature in the area of healthcare management by identifying some important research areas which are linked to both fields. This paper helps both academics and managers to gain a better understanding of the complexity of supply chain management in health services.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Bert Meijboom, Saskia Schmidt‐Bakx and Gert Westert

The purpose of the present paper is to discuss organisational problems that occur in situations that are complex because the treatment of patients requires input from…

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6292

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present paper is to discuss organisational problems that occur in situations that are complex because the treatment of patients requires input from multiple health care providers, and to argue conceptually how to resolve these problems by using SCM practices.

Design/methodology/approach

First SCM, being related to settings where several companies contribute to the production of one particular product, will be discussed in general. Since patient care is about service provision, the next to be examined will be service supply chains. Subsequently, major challenges in patient‐oriented care provision follow in settings where several health care providers are involved, based on which opportunities for applying SCM in patient care will be presented.

Findings

Based on literature addressing country comparisons of patient experiences, four major problem categories are distinguished: communication, patient safety, waiting times, and integration. Although problems also occur within organisational boundaries, the steps from one provider to the next generally represent the weakest spots in a system of health care providers. By applying insights from SCM, these problems can be tackled.

Practical implications

Problems with communication and integration might well benefit from the nomination of care coordinators. Information gathering and processing, i.e. both the availability of medical records of individual patients and information on provider performance, has to be improved. Breaking down functional barriers between care “silos”, within health care providers as well as inter‐organisationally, is a necessary condition for enhanced patient‐centred integration. Policy should also stimulate the provision of more coordinated services, for example, through integral cost prices for separate diseases (“case‐mixed accounting”).

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the emerging literature on using industrial processes or applying business concepts in health care. More specifically, insights from SCM are presented that contribute to patient‐oriented integration in situations where patients' needs cannot be fulfilled by one single (type of) institute. A supply chain perspective on patient care, combined with cross‐functional and cross‐organisational teams, continuous integration practices, lead time control, and appropriate information technology, shows to be promising.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Håkan Aronsson, Mats Abrahamsson and Karen Spens

The objective of this exploratory paper is to find out what is important to consider when developing a supply chain in health care, what is required in order to establish…

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11565

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this exploratory paper is to find out what is important to consider when developing a supply chain in health care, what is required in order to establish a supply chain orientation and how lean and agile can be used as process strategies in order to improve supply chain performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to build an empirical framework for using both lean and agile strategies in health care supply chain management illustrative examples are provided from a Swedish health care setting describing the patient flow and planning processes.

Findings

Supply chain management has potential to work well as a philosophy for patient flow in the health care sector. However, it should not only be about the use of the concept of lean in health care, as in fact is the case in practice today. It is rather about organizing for quick response and flexibility in a hybrid strategy through combining lean and agile process strategies. This can only be done if a systems approach is applied together with a strategic orientation, where cooperative efforts by the supply chain members should synchronize and converge operational as well as strategic capabilities into a unified whole.

Practical implications

The analysis in the paper underlines the importance of focusing on both agility and leanness combined. Hospitals or health care systems that introduce such an approach, as opposed to only relying on lean strategies, could gain both competitive advantages and improved performance.

Originality/value

In health care, even more so than in the manufacturing industry, containment of costs without sacrificing quality is important. This paper applies SCM techniques, tools and concepts that have not been used previously for patient flow in a health care setting, combining lean and agile in one and the same analysis.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Paul Lillrank, Johan Groop and Julia Venesmaa

The purpose of this paper is to explore different units of analysis applicable to the analysis of healthcare service supply chains.

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3817

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore different units of analysis applicable to the analysis of healthcare service supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a literature review, conceptual analysis and two case studies based on process mapping and longitudinal analysis of patient episodes.

Findings

Process management is appropriate in situations where there is a structured flow with a sufficient volume of similar repetitions. In the case where there are significant amounts of exceptions, a process can be decomposed into service events that can be defined and managed as part of a supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

The cases are based on data sets that do not allow empirical generalization.

Practical implications

The use of longitudinal patient episode data elicits problems in the process flow, such as delays and variable sequences. The use of events as a unit of analysis enables routinization in situations with exceptions and irregular sequences.

Originality/value

The service event is an original concept that links healthcare operations management to service‐oriented architectures and the service‐dominant logic.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Vikram Bhakoo and Caroline Chan

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the implementation of e‐business processes in the procurement area of a healthcare supply chain when multiple…

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5216

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the implementation of e‐business processes in the procurement area of a healthcare supply chain when multiple stakeholders are involved.

Design/methodology/approach

A single longitudinal case study spanning three years is presented using data collected from interviews, participant observation, and documentary analysis.

Findings

This study identifies the lack of consistency and poor data quality as well as the global nature of suppliers as key issues in the e‐business implementation in the healthcare supply chain. It also points out the need for collaboration and trust for a successful implementation.

Practical implications

This study provides practitioners with a useful guide to the various technology‐related, management, and business issues that can arise during the implementation of e‐business processes in the context of supply chains involving multiple stakeholders.

Originality/value

This study is distinctive on two grounds: the longitudinal nature of the study over three years; and the wide variety of participants in the Monash Pharmacy Project (including a large general hospital pharmacy, pharmaceutical manufacturers, wholesalers, government regulatory agencies, and technology providers).

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2019

Mohamad Amin Kaviani, Amir Karbassi Yazdi, Lanndon Ocampo and Simonov Kusi-Sarpong

The oil and gas industry is a crucial economic sector for both developed and developing economies. Delays in extraction and refining of these resources would adversely…

Abstract

Purpose

The oil and gas industry is a crucial economic sector for both developed and developing economies. Delays in extraction and refining of these resources would adversely affect industrial players, including that of the host countries. Supplier selection is one of the most important decisions taken by managers of this industry that affect their supply chain operations. However, determining suitable suppliers to work with has become a phenomenon faced by these managers and their organizations. Furthermore, identifying relevant, critical and important criteria needed to guide these managers and their organizations for supplier selection decisions has become even more complicated due to various criteria that need to be taken into consideration. With limited works in the current literature of supplier selection in the oil and gas industry having major methodological drawbacks, the purpose of this paper is to develop an integrated approach for supplier selection in the oil and gas industry.

Design/methodology/approach

To address this problem, this paper proposes a new uncertain decision framework. A grey-Delphi approach is first applied to aid in the evaluation and refinement of these various available criteria to obtain the most important and relevant criteria for the oil and gas industry. The grey systems theoretic concept is adopted to address the subjectivity and uncertainty in human judgments. The grey-Shannon entropy approach is used to determine the criteria weights, and finally, the grey-EDAS (evaluation based on distance from average solution) method is utilized for determining the ranking of the suppliers.

Findings

To exemplify the applicability and robustness of the proposed approach, this study uses the oil and gas industry of Iran as a case in point. From the literature review, 21 criteria were established and using the grey-Delphi approach, 16 were finally considered. The four top-ranked criteria, using grey-Shannon entropy, include warranty level and experience time, relationship closeness, supplier’s technical level and risks which are considered as the most critical and influential criteria for supplier evaluation in the Iranian oil and gas industry. The ranking of the suppliers is obtained, and the best and worst suppliers are also identified. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the results using the proposed methodology are robust.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed approach would assist supply chain practicing managers, including purchasing managers, procurement managers and supply chain managers in the oil and gas and other industries, to effectively select suitable suppliers for cooperation. It can also be used for other multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) applications. Future works on applying other MCDM methods and comparing them with the results of this study can be addressed. Finally, broader and more empirical works are required in the oil and gas industry.

Originality/value

This study is among the first few studies of supplier selection in the oil and gas industry from an emerging economy perspective and sets the stage for future research. The proposed integrated grey-based MCDM approach provides robust results in supplier evaluation and can be used for future domain applications.

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