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1 – 10 of 29
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Jennifer Cooke, Richard Bowskill, Jane Clatworthy, Patrick LeSeve, Tim Rank, Rhian Parham and Rob Horne

The purpose of this paper is to compare beliefs about medication prescribed for bipolar disorder across professional groups within Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs)  

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare beliefs about medication prescribed for bipolar disorder across professional groups within Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs) – psychiatric nurses, psychiatrists, support workers, social workers, and occupational therapists – who each receive different training.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants (n=138) completed an adapted version of the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire. ANOVAs with Tukey's post hoc tests were used to compare beliefs across professional groups.

Findings

Beliefs about medication differed across professional groups, with psychiatrists believing most strongly that medication is necessary in the treatment of bipolar disorder (p<0.05) and reporting the lowest concern about its adverse effects (p<0.05). Psychiatrists and social workers were significantly more likely to believe that patients take less than instructed than occupational therapists, nurses and support workers (p<0.05).

Practical implications

The differences in perceptions of medication across professional groups may reflect differences in training, with the role of medication traditionally being “downplayed” on some training courses. This has implications for patient adherence, as patients' beliefs about medication are likely to be influenced by those of their key workers. This is particularly relevant in terms of “New Ways of Working” where patients are likely to see psychiatrists less often.

Originality/value

This original research provides evidence to support the provision of training about medications and adherence in bipolar disorder for CMHT workers, who may not have had exposure to such training as part of their primary qualification.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2001

Danny Moss and Rob Green

This paper examines critically how the manager’s role in public relations has been conceptualised, comparing how the work of managers has been defined from a public…

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Abstract

This paper examines critically how the manager’s role in public relations has been conceptualised, comparing how the work of managers has been defined from a public relations and management perspective. Here the paper provides a critical review of the relevant public relations and management literatures, pointing to the relative weaknesses in the public relations literature. The paper concludes by examining a particular case study to illustrate some of the weaknesses in current practitioner role models to conceptualise the weaknesses in the public relations manager’s role.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Benjamin Rosenthal and Flavia Cardoso

This paper discusses the evolving nature of the symbolic meaning of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil. Exploring the kratophanous power of soccer in Brazil, we seek to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses the evolving nature of the symbolic meaning of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil. Exploring the kratophanous power of soccer in Brazil, we seek to explain how the relationship that Brazilians had with the 2014 FIFA World Cup reflects profound changes in a mutating society that has deep emotional connections with soccer but at the same time has started to reject the misuse of public resources and struggles to see corruption as a fact of life.

Methodology/approach

The authors conducted a netnography on Facebook communities and on Instagram, reviewed documentaries and short films, as well as press articles on the subject. Data was collected both retrospectively and concurrently. Analysis used open coding, moving up from the emic meanings extracted from the texts to an etic account of the phenomena (Cherrier & Murray, 2007; Thompson, 1997; Thompson & Haytko, 1997).

Findings

We argue that the duality of the Brazilian culture and the kratophanous power of soccer help understand the evolving nature of the relationship Brazilians had with the 2014 FIFA World Cup. We sustain that soccer in Brazil is viewed both as a sport – representing democracy and the hope of social mobility – and as an industry – echoing dissatisfaction with the status quo. Even if ideologically opposed to what the event represented, consumers were bound by very strong cultural connections built around soccer as a sport, a national passion. This changing nature of feelings and attitudes echoes marketplace tensions of a country passing through a democratization maturity process and of a culture in which its citizens find it easier to attempt to be many things at the same time than to take a stand.

Research limitations/implications

This research analyzes the role of social tensions and national passions in relation to a global industry (soccer) and a mega event (the FIFA World Cup). We have looked at the influence of macro cultural forces and tension forces in a sporting event as our findings cannot be understood outside the context of network-based power (Labrecque, vor dem Esche, Mathwick, Novak, & Hofacker, 2013) with Brazilians mobilizing the structure of social networks in favor of their contextual interests. The tense and dynamic political environment in which this research was conducted shed some light on why the #naovaitercopa changed its meaning overtime.

Originality/value

The context of this research contributes to the literature on boycotting (Kozinets & Handelman, 2004; Lee, Motion, & Conroy, 2009), considering that most previous studies had not extensively explored situations where protests arise, obtain significant engagement, yet end up being unsuccessful. We answers the call made by Izberk-Bilgin (2010) for understanding how and why consumer attitudes toward certain types of consumption may change overtime and we demonstrate how the FIFA World Cup possesses kratophanous power in Brazil, and how this characteristic, which is strongly rooted in local culture, contributed to the failure of the boycott.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-323-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Rob Millington, Simon C. Darnell and Tavis Smith

To explore the connections between sport, sustainability and international development through critical understandings of the place of the environment within the Sport for…

Abstract

To explore the connections between sport, sustainability and international development through critical understandings of the place of the environment within the Sport for Development and Peace (SDP) sector. The chapter explores both the forces (historical, social, political, economic) and actors (the UN, IOC) that help to explain the current and increasing connections between sport and sustainable development, before assessing the current state of SDP through three themes: the place of environmentalism in development, sustainable development in/through sport and the trend towards ecological modernization in the sporting sector and beyond.

The chapter synthesizes existing literature from sport, sustainability and international development to provide historical, contemporary and future-oriented assessments of sport and sustainable development.

By framing the sustainability of sport and SDP in terms of the contestability of its political formations, such as ecological modernization, the chapter considers and discusses (potentially) sustainable futures, particularly those informed by the implications of recognizing a New Climatic Regime.

The chapter argues for a number of future areas of study that may push the boundaries of existing research in the area.

The chapter provides one of the first introductions of the idea of a New Climatic Regime within the context of sport and the SDP sector, and argues that within such a political frame, sport cannot exist separately from the environment. As a result, the chapter advances the argument that the SDP sector should now consider itself to be part of the environment, rather than steward of or over it.

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2007

Richard Cullen

Written partially in response to a previous paper published in this Journal suggesting that leadership and leaders are categorised as ‘transformational’ or…

Abstract

Written partially in response to a previous paper published in this Journal suggesting that leadership and leaders are categorised as ‘transformational’ or ‘transactional’, the author suggests that these definitions are too narrow to be reflective of reality. It is instead argued that true and effective leaders operate in a multidimensional framework that combines styles, skills, attributes and abilities that fall within what we commonly refer to as management and leadership. It is suggested that there is a need to move on and to accept that there is not an all‐encompassing model, definition or style of leadership.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Teresa Pereira Heath, Caroline Tynan and Christine Ennew

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextualized view of participants’ accounts of self-gift consumer behaviour (SGCB) throughout the consumption cycle, from the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextualized view of participants’ accounts of self-gift consumer behaviour (SGCB) throughout the consumption cycle, from the motivations to the emotions that follow.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an interpretive approach, focused on participants’ constructions of meanings, using 99 critical incident technique interviews, which followed 16 in-depth interviews.

Findings

This paper identifies the following self-gift motivations: To Reward Myself (and Others); To celebrate; To remember or get closer; To forget or part; To feel loved or cheered up; and To enjoy life. It also uncovers a compensatory/therapeutic dimension in most self-gifts. The authors identify changes in emotional responses to SGCB over time, and suggest a relationship between these emotions and the contexts that drive self-gifts. Self-gifts are conceptualized as pleasure-oriented, symbolic and special consumption experiences, which are self-directed, or both self- and others-directed; perceived by the consumer to be justified by the contexts in which they occur; and driven and followed by context-dependent emotions.

Originality/value

This manuscript offers novel insights into participants’ uses of both SGCB and the act of labelling purchases “self-gifts”. It uncovers how consumers are concerned with accounting for indulgent spending and how this problematizes the concept of “self-gift”. It challenges the idea of a single context for SGCB, showing how interacting motivations explain it. It also introduces a temporal dimension to self-gift theory by considering emotional responses at different times. Finally, it offers a new conceptualization of and theoretical framework for SGCB.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2012

Alicia J. Ferrara, Peter G. Stillman and Adelaide H. Villmoare

Purpose – This study examines the legal system's responses to the disaster of Hurricane Katrina and the flooding of New Orleans particularly in the first two weeks after…

Abstract

Purpose – This study examines the legal system's responses to the disaster of Hurricane Katrina and the flooding of New Orleans particularly in the first two weeks after the storm. During this period, issues of law and order were a primary concern of government decision makers, and these issues framed those of rescue of and aid to the survivors.

Approach – The chapter draws on the analytic concept of the carceral state as it is publicly displayed in official reactions to disaster rumors of disorder and violence. The empirical focus is on policing activity and on events at the Orleans Parish Prison and Camp Greyhound, a temporary detention center established after the storm.

Findings – Largely unfounded rumors of disorder, including roaming gangs, extensive looting, rape, and murder, fueled the emphasis on law and order and policing and carceral decisions of officials. Actions intended to facilitate an individual's survival or comfort or evacuation were often treated as criminal. New Orleans became a prison city.

Originality – The analysis develops the concept of a “prison city” as an embodiment of the carceral state and suggests that the carceral state prompts and reinforces rumors about disorder and the tendency to designate policing and incarceration as essential first responses to disasters in the United States.

Details

Disasters, Hazards and Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-914-1

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1903

IN the progress of a course of lectures on Elementary Bibliography, I found some difficulty in obtaining for my students, a brief and satisfactory list of some of the…

Abstract

IN the progress of a course of lectures on Elementary Bibliography, I found some difficulty in obtaining for my students, a brief and satisfactory list of some of the leading and most typical bibliographies. There are a number of bibliographies of bibliographies published, general and select, but none of them are available in handy form for class purposes. The following list of books on bibliographical subjects, represents the works which I described in detail to my students as representative and useful examples of books about books, and I also exhibited nearly the whole of them, so as to familiarize the students with the physical appearance and contents of the majority of the books. I have reprinted this list through the courtesy of the editor of the Library World, because it has been suggested that it may be useful to many librarians whose stock of bibliography is small, and to assistants who are studying the elements of practical bibliography. The list makes no pretence either to fulness or accuracy, and must be taken for what it really is, a working list of bibliographies prepared as a series of suggestions. Neither sections three or four are more than the barest outlines, but they contain representative books well worth study. I found difficulty in obtaining specimens of some of the older bibliographies like Mattaire, Panzer, Hain, &c., and as these works are becoming very scarce and costly, it will be a matter of impossibility for the municipal libraries to obtain copies either for love or money. Most of the British municipal libraries are poorly equipped with the leading bibliographical works of reference, and but for the kindness of Mr. Thomas Greenwood and others, I should not have been able to borrow for exhibition one half of those I was able to show. This seems to me a strong reason why the library of the Library Association should be equipped with all the necessary books for the study and teaching of bibliography and library economy. Bibliographical works are becoming so scarce, that students who have to work away from the large old established libraries, will find it difficult to make satisfactory progress.

Details

New Library World, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Elizabeth Parsons and Adelina Broadbridge

The purpose of this paper is to explore how gender identity is played out in a particular type of work setting, that of charity retail, and to explore the impacts of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how gender identity is played out in a particular type of work setting, that of charity retail, and to explore the impacts of increased managerialism on this process of identity construction.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is informed by interviews with 22 charity shop managers from three UK cities. The narratives of three of these managers are chosen for more in‐depth analysis. The paper focuses primarily on understandings of identity as practised, exploring the enactment of a series of conflicting and overlapping “selves” in the workplace. The practices and discourses surrounding the retail (or businesslike) self, the charitable self and the caring self in particular are discussed.

Findings

It was found that the process of creeping managerialism in the sector both values and promotes the discourses of “retail” but marginalises those of “charity and of care”. This presents serious dilemmas of identity for charity shop managers and is a source of considerable stress for them. However, it was also found that managers were using the discourses of charity and of care to resist this managerial process. Attention was paid to the ways in which gendered identities are constrained and enabled by and through the discourses circulating in organisational life. Presents a series of observations concerning the future possibilities that retail work in particular might offer for identity construction.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is based on a small sample of qualitative interviews, therefore the findings are not meant to be generalisable to the wider population. This “vignette” approach allows us to explore in some depth the relations between identity construction and organisational context.

Originality/value

Empirical paper using an alternative lens to analyse gender identity and the impacts of increasing managerialism on processes of identity construction. Highlights in particular the continual struggles over meaning within organisations.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Simon S.M. Ho and Victor T.F. Ng

One reason for the slow adoption rate of Electronic Fund Transfer atPoint‐of‐Sale (EFTPoS) is that consumers perceive that EFTPoS has ahigher level of risk than other…

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Abstract

One reason for the slow adoption rate of Electronic Fund Transfer at Point‐of‐Sale (EFTPoS) is that consumers perceive that EFTPoS has a higher level of risk than other traditional payment methods. Makes use of a concept in consumer behaviour and perceived risk to study the differences of consumers′ risk perceptions among alternative payment methods and whether these perceptions will be affected by the size of purchase and EFTPoS usage experience. The major findings are: (1) EFTPoS has the lowest physical risk and highest financial risk, the credit card has the lowest psychological risk and highest time loss risk, while cash has the highest physical risk and lowest performance risk; (2) Physical risk, financial risk and time loss risk for cash payment are significantly higher when the purchase is large, while performance risk for EFTPoS and credit card payment is significantly higher when the purchase is small; and (3) users of EFTPoS have a significantly higher level of perceived financial and time loss risk than non‐users, while non‐users have higher level of psychological risk. The overall finding is that the risk profile of EFTPoS is similar to that of the credit card but significantly different from cash.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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