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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2018

Robert Griffiths, Jay Probert and Brendan Cropley

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of a foundation degree programme, delivered via a flipped university approach, on student learning, development and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of a foundation degree programme, delivered via a flipped university approach, on student learning, development and employability in the sector of football coaching and development.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method design was adopted, whereby current (n=106) and graduate (n=41) students from the programme completed an online course evaluation questionnaire and then follow-up interviews were conducted with 12 of the initial sample to explore the impact of the programme in more detail.

Findings

Participants reported significant benefits of the flipped university approach on their career development, improvement in their inter- and intra-personal skills (e.g. communication, reflection, confidence) and the acquisition of industry relevant knowledge. Recommendations include a greater provision of tailored study support for individuals and broadening the coaching portfolio of students to help address the diversification in Football Community Trust remits.

Research limitations/implications

This study has indicated that new approaches to student learning and development are better suited to preparing young people for the industry in which they seek to gain employment post-education. Sampling a wider range of student perspectives qualitatively would have provided a more thorough insight into their experiences. However, this provides an avenue for future research that seeks to explore the mechanisms through which such approaches to learning facilitate development.

Originality/value

The novel flipped university concept is one that should be considered as a way of better educating and preparing students for employment in the sports industry. It is an approach that could be explored by a wide range of sectors as an alternative to both campus-based higher education and degree apprenticeships.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Jon Drabenstott

Five prominent consultants—Susan Baerg Epstein, James Rush, Jose‐Marie Griffiths, Rob McGee, and Wilson Stahl—address the development and use of the request for proposals…

Abstract

Five prominent consultants—Susan Baerg Epstein, James Rush, Jose‐Marie Griffiths, Rob McGee, and Wilson Stahl—address the development and use of the request for proposals (RFPs) in the library automation procurement process. Most consultants agree that the RFP is an effective means of selecting a system, if used properly. But it can be misused, is frequently substituted for sound judgment and intelligent decision making on the part of library staff, and is expensive. Librarians often focus so much on preparing the RFP that the goals of the planning process are lost. The preparation of the RFP is only one step in the procurement and installation process. It should be viewed as one intermediate objective, which must be coordinated with others to achieve successful results.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Rob Griffiths and Paul Rainer

The strategy for sport in Wales, Climbing Higher, establishes some very ambitious targets for raising the levels of sport and physical activity participation over the next…

Abstract

The strategy for sport in Wales, Climbing Higher, establishes some very ambitious targets for raising the levels of sport and physical activity participation over the next 20 years. To support its strategy, the Welsh Assembly Government has promised an additional 12,000 jobs within the sport and recreation sector. Research conducted with employers highlights that many sports degree programmes are not “fit for purpose” and are not fully preparing graduates for work within the industry. This paper considers how the University of Glamorgan, in liaison with key industry partners, has designed a sports development degree “fit” for the industry and which meets the expectations of Climbing Higher. The success of the degree programme relies upon the formation of multi‐agency partnerships at a local and regional level. Experiential learning underpins the degree with students required to reflect upon the challenges that they face in getting participants more active; the community placements embedded within modules allow students to experience the complexities of working within the sports development sector. It is a unique and holistic approach, supported by key local and national partners and is fundamental in supporting the objectives set by the Welsh Assembly Government.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Jon Drabenstott

Five prominent consultants—James Rush, Richard Smith, Susan Baerg Epstein, Jose‐Marie Griffiths, and Rob McGee—address the issues that most effect system performance. They…

Abstract

Five prominent consultants—James Rush, Richard Smith, Susan Baerg Epstein, Jose‐Marie Griffiths, and Rob McGee—address the issues that most effect system performance. They note that virtually every phase of planning for a system involves issues related to performance. No single topic is more essential to the successful implementation of a system. Guidelines and advise are provided.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2007

Describes the two‐stage training that quick‐service restaurant McDonald's has devised for its customer‐facing employees.

Abstract

Purpose

Describes the two‐stage training that quick‐service restaurant McDonald's has devised for its customer‐facing employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Details the Hospitality Plus workshops, attended by more than 2,700 employees in three weeks at the end of 2004, which covered personal appearance; ensuring that dining areas are clean and inviting; awareness of customers – including the disabled and those with children – needing assistance; creating a friendly atmosphere by acknowledging customers; complaint handling, the ability to answer enquiries on menu ingredients and awareness of McDonald's role in the community. Also describes the Customer Care programme, designed to capture the best parts of the Hospitality Plus workshops, but also to be a sustainable session to help staff to deliver service that customers would view as superior to the competition.

Findings

Demonstrates that the training has helped to raise the percentage of customers agreeing that McDonald's service is friendly and courteous, fast and efficient. Reveals that the programmes have also reduced turnover among customer‐facing employees by more than 8% in a year.

Practical implications

Highlights the key role of training for customer‐facing employees in the service sector.

Originality/value

Shows that the training – which is not just a one‐off solution – represents real value for money, given the number of people trained and the cultural impact the company has gained.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Garry D. Carnegie and Christopher J. Napier

The purpose of this paper is to examine the origins and development of the “Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal (AAAJ) Community”, a flourishing international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the origins and development of the “Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal (AAAJ) Community”, a flourishing international interdisciplinary accounting research community. This scholarly community has emerged over some 30 years from the publication in 1988 of the inaugural issue of AAAJ under the joint editorship of James Guthrie and Lee Parker. This historical account discusses the motivation for establishing the journal and the important publishing initiatives, developments and trends across this period. The study positions the journal as a key thought leader, the catalyst for other Community activities such as the Asia-Pacific Interdisciplinary Research in Accounting conference.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation involved a selective review of the contents of AAAJ, particularly the annual editorials published since inception, and other relevant literature, analysis of the main research themes and the most cited papers, and oral history interviews with the joint editors. The future prospects for the AAAJ Community are addressed.

Findings

The AAAJ Community has shaped and led developments in interdisciplinary accounting research. Recognised for innovation and with a reputation for nurturing scholars, AAAJ continues to grow in stature as one of the world’s leading accounting journals, challenging the status quo and fostering inclusive scholarship.

Research limitations/implications

The study does not examine the journal’s publication patterns nor assess in detail the research studies that have been published in the journal.

Originality/value

The study recognises AAAJ as central to the development of an interdisciplinary accounting research community, firmly located in the sociological, critical and interpretative tradition also associated with some other leading accounting journals.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Jon Drabenstott

Library automation has both tested the educational preparation of librarians and created new educational demands. Four major consultants—James E. Rush, Jose‐Marie Griffiths

Abstract

Library automation has both tested the educational preparation of librarians and created new educational demands. Four major consultants—James E. Rush, Jose‐Marie Griffiths, Wilson M. Stahl, and Rob McGee—discuss the competencies currently required of professional librarians, consider the extent to which new graduates and working librarians possess these qualifications, and identify methods by which organizations and individuals can realize the goal of professional competence. In addition to addressing formal educational programs, the consultants place a great deal of emphasis on continuing education. Continuing education must become a job requirement; library managers must be responsible for creating, encouraging, and supporting such opportunities for individuals and the total organization.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Hugh Worrall, Richard Schweizer, Ellen Marks, Lin Yuan, Chris Lloyd and Rob Ramjan

Support groups are a common feature of the mental health support engaged by carers and consumers. The purpose of this paper is to update and consolidate the knowledge and…

Abstract

Purpose

Support groups are a common feature of the mental health support engaged by carers and consumers. The purpose of this paper is to update and consolidate the knowledge and the evidence for the effectiveness of mental health support groups.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a systematic literature review of relevant databases around support groups for mental health. Support groups are defined as meetings of people with similar experiences, such as those defined as carers of a person living with a mental illness or a person living with a mental illness. These meetings aim to provide support and companionship to one another.

Findings

The results show that there is a consistent pattern of evidence, over a long period of time, which confirms the effectiveness of mental health support groups for carers and people living with mental illness. There is strong, scientifically rigorous evidence which shows the effectiveness of professionally facilitated, family-led support groups, psychoeducation carers support groups, and professionally facilitated, program-based support groups for people living with mental illness.

Research limitations/implications

This research implies the use of support groups is an important adjunct to the support of carers and people with mental illness, including severe mental illness.

Originality/value

This research brings together a range of studies indicating the usefulness of support groups as an adjunct to mental health therapy.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Jon Drabenstott

Unethical behavior hurts everyone, including the offending person or organization. Unfortunately, the effects of unethical behavior are often long delayed, so the…

Abstract

Unethical behavior hurts everyone, including the offending person or organization. Unfortunately, the effects of unethical behavior are often long delayed, so the consequences are thus often attributed to the wrong cause. When librarians purchase automated systems, unethical practices—whether committed by consultants, vendors, or librarians—will cause significant harm to the libraries because they can not only acquire inadequate systems, but encounter many managerial and operational problems as well. In this symposium, five major consultants—Rob McGee, Howard Harris, Jose‐Marie Griffiths, Susan Baerg Epstein, and James Rush—share their experiences and thoughts on related issues.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Gayle Jennings, Carl I. Cater, Rob Hales, Sandra Kensbock and Glen Hornby

The purpose of this article is to study how real world learning was used to engender and enhance sustainability principles and practices with 11 micro-, small- and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to study how real world learning was used to engender and enhance sustainability principles and practices with 11 micro-, small- and medium-tourism business enterprises and 101 university tourism students enrolled across three university courses.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research processes were used to focus curricula on “education about and for sustainability”. A participatory paradigm informed the action research processes. The key methodology was qualitative. Empirical materials were generated through lived experiences, reflexive team conversations, team journals, reflexive journals and student learning materials. Reflexive conversations and reflective dialogue framed interpretations.

Findings

The action research process found that pedagogies, andragogies and ethnogogies that emphasize social processes of meaning making and sensemaking enhance and engender “education about sustainability” and “education for sustainability”, especially when coupled with real world learning as a platform for social and profession-building processes between university students, course teaching staff and industry, in this case, micro-, small- and medium-tourism entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative findings of this action research study are specific to the participants involved. Generalizability to other university and business settings and goodness of fit require further study.

Practical implications

Insights are provided with regard to implementing real world learning in university undergraduate and postgraduate courses by partnering with industry and focusing on education for sustainability (EfS). A demonstration of the effectiveness of action research as a tool for changing curricula is provided.

Social implications

Learning is a social process of meaning making. Time for real world social interaction is critical for learning. Partnering with industry complements student learning and facilitates the translation of theory into practice.

Originality/value

EfS is engendered and enhanced when learning-teaching engagements are predicated on real world settings, circumstances and experiences.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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