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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2009

Rune Elvik, Alena Høye, Truls Vaa and Michael Sørensen

Abstract

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The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 1998

Nashwan A. Samoail and Saad Yousif

In urban areas where roadworks are required, single lane shuttle operation is applied, especially where there is limited road space. There are operational problems…

Abstract

In urban areas where roadworks are required, single lane shuttle operation is applied, especially where there is limited road space. There are operational problems relating to the site such as site geometry, visibility, length of roadworks zone, position of signs with other traffic control devices and signal timing. Other problems are mainly related to drivers’ behaviour and their compliance with traffic controls on site.

The reduced road width caused by the works will interrupt the free flow of traffic and it can also add to the risks to road users. In addition, shuttle operation may introduce long queues and increase delays especially during peak periods.

There is a need to identify those parameters and behaviours which might influence traffic performance in terms of safety and capacity. An investigation of four roadworks sites in urban roadworks within the Greater Manchester area was undertaken for this purpose. Parameters included in the examination were position of the STOP sign, signal timing, weather conditions, time headway, vehicle speed and percentages of heavy goods vehicles (HGV) in the traffic stream. Statistical analysis and comparisons between sites were conducted. Other factors related to the operation of the shuttle-lane were provided based on site observations.

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Mathematics in Transport Planning and Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-043430-8

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Vince Mangioni

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the land acquisition phase and site assembly of land for large scale infrastructure road projects and its impact on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the land acquisition phase and site assembly of land for large scale infrastructure road projects and its impact on property owners. A review of one of the largest roadwork projects currently underway in Sydney Australia demonstrates the adverse impact that has resulted in property owners challenging the approach used by government to acquire land for this project. Similar case studies are used to set out the key measures that should apply internationally in mitigating challenges from property owners in the land acquisition phase. It further shows that while adequate statutory provisions are important, it is the practices of acquiring authorities that ultimately determine the success and expedition of this initial important phase of these projects.

Design/methodology/approach

In measuring the factors that impact the acquisition of land by negotiation in contrast to acquisition by compulsory taking, a case study methodology is used. In this approach, the author reviews two completed projects and the factors that contributed to their success. These are contrasted with the primary case study currently underway in Sydney, the WestConnex project in which a number of adverse factors have emerged that have impacted this project. The review of these cases examined provides options for reforms that should be adopted both in the WestConnex case and across projects internationally.

Findings

It is demonstrated that the impact of the land acquisition phase on property owners with limited ability to rehouse within the same or surrounding locations, results in increases to challenges. This factor has prompted increases in the number of cases that have proceeded to court and potentially impacts the public perception and site assembly phase of large scale road projects. The inability for impacted property owners to relocate themselves has resulted in a breakdown in the ability for acquiring authorities to achieve acquisition by agreement. This is evidenced by significant increases in the number of properties that have been acquired by compulsion since 2016. It is found that the operational provisions of the land acquisition processes were obsolete in NSW, particularly those leading up to acquisition that was originally designed to assist owners. The paper finds that the most important phase of a megaproject is the planning and consultation phase, which includes most importantly the way in which impacted owners are informed, assisted and compensated. It is concluded that the processes engaged in by acquiring authorities rather than the statutory provisions available, will determine the success of the land acquisition phase and perceptions of the project.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of this paper is defining the changing landscape that has led to the adverse impact on property owners in the site assembly process for large scale projects. It identifies the reforms that will enhance opportunity for owners to relocate and rehouse which will expedite the acquisition phase of megaprojects and restore acquisition by agreement rather than by compulsion. This in turn will contribute to improve public perception of large scale projects in urbanised locations.

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International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Case study
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Goutam Dutta

S. R. Pandey, Superintending Engineer (SE), Rural Roads Department, Bihar wanted to have a meeting of all the agencies involved, including his other engineers, the…

Abstract

S. R. Pandey, Superintending Engineer (SE), Rural Roads Department, Bihar wanted to have a meeting of all the agencies involved, including his other engineers, the contractors to discuss his village road-making project in Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yojona (PMGSY). This case discusses how the concept of work breakdown is used to subdivide all the activities of road-making into different sub activities (earthwork, bridgework, roadwork and other miscellaneous activities) in different levels.

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Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Case study
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Goutam Dutta

S. R. Pandey, Superintending Engineer (SE), Rural Roads Department, Bihar wanted to have a meeting of all the agencies involved, including his other engineers, the…

Abstract

S. R. Pandey, Superintending Engineer (SE), Rural Roads Department, Bihar wanted to have a meeting of all the agencies involved, including his other engineers, the contractors to discuss his village road-making project in Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yojona (PMGSY). This case discusses how the concept of work breakdown is used to subdivide all the activities of road-making into different sub activities (earthwork, bridgework, roadwork and other miscellaneous activities) in different levels.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1969

Denning, Edmund Davies and L.J. Phillimore

February 10, 1969 Master and Servant — Negligence — Safe system of work — Roadworks — Workman in gang resurfacing carriageway injured by lorry driving too fast — Warning…

Abstract

February 10, 1969 Master and Servant — Negligence — Safe system of work — Roadworks — Workman in gang resurfacing carriageway injured by lorry driving too fast — Warning signs in position — Whether employers negligent in not erecting barriers against passing traffic — No evidence of common practice of erecting barriers — Effect of suggested barriers to reduce traffic to one lane — Need to balance public interest against risk to workers on carriageway — Whether lorry wholly to blame.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Zeeshan Aziz, Rana Muhammad Qasim and Sahawneh Wajdi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the integration of discrete event simulation (DES) and value stream mapping (VSM) to enhance the productivity of road surfacing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the integration of discrete event simulation (DES) and value stream mapping (VSM) to enhance the productivity of road surfacing operations by achieving high production rates and minimum road closure times. Highway infrastructure is one of the most valuable assets owned by the public sector. The success of national and local economies as well as quality of life of the general public depend on the efficient operations of highways. Ensuring smooth traffic operations requires maintenance and improvements of the highest standard.

Design/methodology/approach

Research approach involved the use of primary data collected from direct observation, interviews, review of archival records and productivity databases. Based on this, process maps and value stream maps were developed which were subsequently used to produce discrete event simulation models for the exploration of different optimisation scenarios.

Findings

This research highlights the synergistic relationship between VSM and DES in driving innovation in construction processes. Identified factors that affect roadworks process productivity include machine, manpower, material, information, environment and method-related factors. A DES model is presented to optimise the process and increase the production rates. A hybrid DES-VSM approach ensures an integrated approach to process optimisation.

Research limitations/implications

This study is an application of hybrid version of previously published DES-VSM framework in the manufacturing sector. The present study has extended and tested its applicability within road surfacing operations. The different what-if scenarios presented in this paper might not be applicable to other parts of the world owing to various constraints. The study has focused on addressing the waste production inherent in pavement laying process. Even though external variables could possibly influence pavement process, those were ignored to allow for in-depth focus on the process under consideration.

Practical implications

Road users are one of the most important stakeholders that will benefit from the positive implications of this study. Private resurfacing companies and transport departments can optimise their overall process and style of working by comparing their end-to-end process and work plans with the ones mentioned in this paper. It will boost the productivity of equipment like planners, pavers and other machines used for resurfacing operations.

Originality/value

Existing approaches to process modelling such as VSM and process diagrams are constrained by their effectiveness in the analysis of dynamic and complex processes. This study presents a DES-based approach to validate targeted improvements of the current state of road surfacing processes and in exploration of different optimisation scenarios.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

D. Thorpe

This paper describes research into use of Online Remote Construction Management (ORCM) on road construction projects, from the perspective of an industry representative in…

Abstract

This paper describes research into use of Online Remote Construction Management (ORCM) on road construction projects, from the perspective of an industry representative in the research project. The aim of ORCM is to use advanced electronic communication technologies to enhance online real‐time communication between the parties to a construction project, and thus improve the project delivery process. It aims to maximize the use of time of personnel and reduce paperwork. A typical trial construction project in the Queensland Department of Main Roads, with which the author was employed at the time of writing this paper, is described. This site used a Web‐based system to manage communications. Observed benefits from using ORCM and issues in implementation are discussed. While the process is promising, there needs to be additional review into the attendant risks and cultural issues, and the ways in which these matters are addressed.

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Claudio Baccarani and Fabio Cassia

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the resource integration processes that occur within service ecosystems affect both the well-being of the entire ecosystem…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the resource integration processes that occur within service ecosystems affect both the well-being of the entire ecosystem and the well-being of specific focal actors (i.e. customers) in the ecosystem. Specifically, this paper considered cases in which customers’ well-being results from simultaneous participation in a multiplicity of service ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

An illustrative example, taken from the tourism context, was used to develop a conceptual framework (of which customers were the focal actors) to evaluate service ecosystem outcomes.

Findings

The results showed that the well-being of focal actors (i.e. customers) should be evaluated by considering the outcomes that arise in the interlocking service ecosystems in which the customers simultaneously participate. Further, in relation to these interlocking service ecosystems, high levels of well-being within a single ecosystem did not necessarily cause focal actors to experience high levels of well-being.

Research limitations/implications

To ensure the creation of positive customer experiences, the co-creating actors (e.g. the service providers) must first identify each of the interlocking service ecosystems in which customers simultaneously participate and then establish interactions with other relevant actors.

Originality/value

By considering the complex relationships between the well-being of a service ecosystem as a whole and the well-being of specific focal actors (e.g. customers) in an ecosystem, this study advances knowledge about evaluations on the performance of service ecosystems.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Joseph Scanlon

Looks at the way in which public transport is used for evacuation of personnel in the event of emergencies or disasters. Although the work of the emergency services is…

Abstract

Looks at the way in which public transport is used for evacuation of personnel in the event of emergencies or disasters. Although the work of the emergency services is well documented, it seems that the important task of evacuation, and particularly the planning, operation and documentation is often overlooked. This article looks at how public transport copes with this task, and suggests that this is due to the sometimes unpredictable nature of the transport system due to roadworks, road closures, accidents, etc. Special events, such as football matches, are a regular occurrence, which include the need to move large crowds to and from the venue. This strategy and planning can be used in the evacuation of people in the event of a disaster.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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