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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2011

Florence Yean Yng Ling and Wee Tat Ng

Singapore's land transportation is governed by a comprehensive set of rules, regulations, operations and systems to ensure its effectiveness and efficiency. The Land…

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1095

Abstract

Purpose

Singapore's land transportation is governed by a comprehensive set of rules, regulations, operations and systems to ensure its effectiveness and efficiency. The Land Transport Authority (LTA) is the main agency in charge of road operations. Despite the LTA's best efforts, road related problems still surface every now and then. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how to boost the performance of existing road infrastructure. Using Singapore as a case, the specific research objectives are to: ascertain motorists’ level of satisfaction with the road infrastructure; find out problems faced by motorists when using the road infrastructure; determine factors affecting motorists’ satisfaction with the road infrastructure; and design and test a model to predict motorists’ satisfaction with the road infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted on motorists. Through a combination of convenience sampling and snowball sampling, a total of 53 responses were collected. After the survey, interviews were conducted with subject matter experts to understand the current practices and possible solutions to the problems.

Findings

The most significant problem is water ponding on roads. Traffic redirection due to road works and coordination among government agencies in road opening works also did not achieve significantly good ratings. Two practices are found to directly give rise to higher satisfaction with the road infrastructure: road cleanliness; and efficiency in traffic redirection arising from road works.

Research limitations/implications

Motorists were asked to rate on a ten‐point scale. This may give rise to bias because satisfaction and performance are subjective and not easily quantified.

Practical implications

Motorists’ satisfaction level with the road infrastructure is dependent on cleanliness of roads and efficiency of traffic diversion when there are road works. The implication is that the government should arrange for roads to be regularly cleaned and at the same time educate the public to keep roads clean and enforce laws against those who litter. The time for traffic diversion should be minimized by increasing productivity of road works, so that these can be completed quickly.

Originality/value

The road network is a valuable infrastructural asset of a country. Due to its large scale and complexity, managing road operations is no easy feat. Even though Singapore has a comprehensive set of procedures, rules and regulations to manage this asset, problems and complaints continue to surface. This study has identified the major problems plaguing Singapore's road infrastructure. Furthermore, a model to predict motorists’ satisfaction with the road infrastructure was successfully developed and tested. With this knowledge in mind, the LTA can focus on improving these factors to boost performance of road infrastructure through road maintenance and road works.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Lenahan O’Connell, Juita-Elena (Wie) Yusuf and Khairul Azfi Anuar

The purpose of this paper is to compare public preferences for investment and spending on non-automobile infrastructures (mass transit and bicycling) to preferences for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare public preferences for investment and spending on non-automobile infrastructures (mass transit and bicycling) to preferences for new roads and the repair of current highways. The study explores the factors that explain preferences for non-automobile infrastructure using a three-factor model including self-interest (personal transportation benefits), concern for community-wide benefits (political beliefs), and concern for the economic impact. The study uses a case study of the urban context of the Hampton Roads region of Southeastern Virginia (USA).

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis uses data from a 2013 telephone survey of urban residents in the Hampton Roads area. Survey respondents were asked to identify their two investment priorities from four options: repairing existing roads, bridges, and tunnels; constructing new or expanding roads, bridges, and tunnels; expanding mass transit; and expanding bicycle routes and improving bike safety.

Findings

Repairing existing highway infrastructure is the most popular spending priority (66 percent of residents). There is as much support (46 percent) for investing in non-automobile infrastructure as for investing in new roads, bridges, and tunnels. Significant predictors of support for non-automobile infrastructure, using the three-factor model, are: length of commute time, self-identification as liberal, use of light rail, and a belief that light rail contributes to economic development.

Originality/value

The study examines public preferences for both non-traditional and traditional transportation infrastructure investments. It highlights the factors that contribute to public support for different transportation spending options.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2009

A.K. Sharma and Ekta Vohra

This study aims to examine the current status of road infrastructure in India, working out the gap in the availability of required length and the quality of roads besides…

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2684

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the current status of road infrastructure in India, working out the gap in the availability of required length and the quality of roads besides the comparison with other economies. It also seeks to analyse the socio‐economic‐political environment in India to assess the country's attractiveness towards private sector participation in road infrastructure development.

Design/methodology/approach

The targets for the road sector development set by the Government of India and the current road status of China are taken as benchmarks to enumerate the existing gap in road development in the country. Growth trends of the road sector and their impact on the manufacturing sector have been worked out to assess the development of road infrastructure and its impact on the industry in the country.

Findings

The study advocates that the present pace of road infrastructure development is inadequate in India vis‐à‐vis other developing economies. The quality of roads compared with China is far below expectations and this poor hinterland connectivity is affecting the trade growth in the country.

Originality/value

The paper significantly contributes in assessing the state of road infrastructure in India and highlighting the weaknesses while comparing it with other developing and developed economies. The key issues identified are of immense help to the policy makers in the country for having detailed insight and correcting the road infrastructure development programmes.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Ajit Kumar Sinha and Kumar Neeraj Jha

The purpose of this paper is to identify the problems faced by banks, lenders, financial institutions, public authority, developers and concessionaires in course of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the problems faced by banks, lenders, financial institutions, public authority, developers and concessionaires in course of financing of public–private partnership (PPP) road projects. Subsequently, the reasons that contribute to these problems were analyzed to come up with recommendations for mitigation of these problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted is based on identification of financing problems and the reasons thereof, from a systematic and critical review of literature. Financing details including problems faced and reasons behind were extracted from details of one port, one airport and one road project. Data pertaining to financing of PPP road projects have been collected for completed (five projects) as well as projects under implementation (five projects) during a time interval of four months, starting from December 2018 to March 2019. The chosen three projects for case studies were executed in airport project at Kolkata in four years, offshore container terminal at Mumbai port in six years and Tuni Ankapali road project in three years. This period attains importance, as simultaneous progressive development and innovation in the PPP mode of project execution was taking place rapidly.

Findings

The commercial banks in India dominate in providing debt to the PPP infrastructure projects, especially in the road sector. The non-banking financial companies and other intermediaries were still in their infancy then, and a corporate bond market was growing steadily, though slowly. Financing problems faced by the developers resulted in unwarranted time and cost overruns emanating from delay in land acquisition and grant of approvals, with these being the two major barriers to private sector participation. Even schedule overrun finally resulted in increased construction and financing cost.

Originality/value

Demand for upgradation, building and expansion of transportation infrastructure (roads) exists to keep pace with economic development. Problems like lack of a developed market for financing, inadequate institutional capacity, lack of personnel having domain expertise and absence of exclusive legislation to govern the implementation of PPP road projects are encountered by the sponsors and developers. Delay in land acquisition and environment clearance inhibits any decisive action by the lenders and investors, as these two are integrally linked to the decisions to be taken with respect to the financing of projects. Investors and bankers are generally apprehensive of their investment getting locked in or ending up as non-performing assets. Identification and proposed mitigation of these problems may likely smoothen the rough edges for the financing of projects, resulting in smoother implementation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Book part
Publication date: 18 April 2018

Narelle Haworth and Jacqueline Fuller

Purpose – Bicycle riding provides a sustainable and affordable solution to many of the significant problems associated with motorised transport and physical inactivity…

Abstract

Purpose – Bicycle riding provides a sustainable and affordable solution to many of the significant problems associated with motorised transport and physical inactivity. The provision of infrastructure plays an important role in encouraging people to begin and subsequently continue to ride bicycles and to do so safely.

Methodology – This chapter describes different types of on- and off-road infrastructure and reviews studies of their effects on rider numbers and safety. In addition, it looks at the roles that end-of-trip facilities and bikeshare programs can play in contributing to bicycle use and general transport sustainability.

FindingsInfrastructure characteristics can influence both perceived and objective levels of safety. It is important to identify and avoid treatments that increase perceived safety but are actually less safe. The type of infrastructure needed or desired differs between current and potential riders and according to trip purpose. Well-designed marked bicycle lanes on roads can reduce crash rates. Safety at intersections can be improved by: advanced green lights for cyclists, short cuts for right-hand turns, brightly coloured bicycle paths and advanced waiting positions for cyclists. Off-road facilities are generally safer, but intersections with roads must be carefully treated. Shared paths and footpaths are risky for older pedestrians (and older cyclists).

Implications – In many countries the provision of more infrastructure that increases the perceived safety of riding is needed to encourage cycling, particularly transport cycling and cycling by women.

Details

Safe Mobility: Challenges, Methodology and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-223-1

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Paul Chinowsky, Amy Schweikert, Gordon Hughes, Carolyn S. Hayles, Niko Strzepek, Kenneth Strzepek and Michael Westphal

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential impact of climate change on the built environment in four Northern Asian countries. The impact on roads and buildings…

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442

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential impact of climate change on the built environment in four Northern Asian countries. The impact on roads and buildings infrastructure in China, Japan, South Korea and Mongolia were considered during the decades 2030, 2050 and 2090.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a stressor-response approach, where using the analysis of 17 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) approved Global Circulation Model (GCM) scenarios, projections for impacts from flooding events, precipitation amounts and temperature were determined. The cost of the impacts, based on both maintenance and new construction considerations, were then determined. “Adapt” and “No Adapt” scenarios were incorporated to predict potential costs in each era.

Findings

Mongolia is vulnerable under the majority of scenarios and faces the greatest opportunity cost in terms of potential loss to enhancing the road stock. China is also vulnerable, but the extent of this vulnerability varies widely based on the climate scenarios. Japan is primarily vulnerable to road stock impacts, although some scenarios indicate buildings vulnerability. South Korea appears to have the least vulnerability but could still face $1 billion annual costs from climate change impacts.

Practical implications

Results indicate the need for proactive policy planning to avoid costly impacts later in the century.

Originality/value

The study illustrates the diverse affects that may occur under climate change scenarios and the potential benefit gained from understanding and planning for the projected climate impacts on the built environment.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Book part
Publication date: 18 April 2018

Francesca La Torre

Purpose – Freeway networks are designed to higher standards and are safer infrastructures as compared to other road types, if properly designed. On the other hand, these…

Abstract

Purpose – Freeway networks are designed to higher standards and are safer infrastructures as compared to other road types, if properly designed. On the other hand, these facilities are driven at very high speeds and therefore speed and design consistency are essential for achieving safe infrastructure designs. This chapter describes the criteria for speed and design consistency and looks at new tools and criteria for improving freeway safety in new and in existing infrastructures.

Methodology – This chapter describes the criteria to evaluate if there are speed, design and human factors inconsistencies, as well as potential solutions for tackling local deficiencies and speeding issues. As one of the critical issues in freeway safety is represented by run-off-road crashes, a specific section in the chapter is devoted to newly developed design and assessment tools for improving roadside safety. The potential implications of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) technologies on freeways design and management are also presented.

Findings and Social Implications – The important crash reduction trends observed in the decade 2001–2010 are now slowing down and new actions are required to be coupled with more traditional design checks. The full implementation of cooperative ITS systems is expected to have a very important impact on road safety, but in the short term several safety improvements can be realised: section speed enforcement techniques and high-friction wearing courses have been proven to be extremely effective, as have perceptual measures accounting for human factors principles.

Details

Safe Mobility: Challenges, Methodology and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-223-1

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Ezri Hayat, Richard Haigh and Dilanthi Amaratunga

This paper aims to identify the main aspects requiring immediate attention in the post-disaster reconstruction of road infrastructure, thereby providing a major synthesis…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the main aspects requiring immediate attention in the post-disaster reconstruction of road infrastructure, thereby providing a major synthesis, which advances the understanding in this important area.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature and empirical evidence obtained from documents and semi-structured interviews with 28 respondents of three case study districts in Aceh, Indonesia was analysed using NVivo 10. The findings were validated through triangulation with the literature and consultation with the experts in the field of disaster management and road infrastructure.

Findings

The authors propose a framework for the reconstruction of road infrastructure, which respond to the peculiarities of road projects in a post-disaster setting. The framework comprises various components requiring detailed attention in the reconstruction process and describes their position in the road project and disaster management cycle.

Originality/value

The framework fills the gap in the body of knowledge with regard to road infrastructure reconstruction in a post-disaster context. For the first time, this paper recognises the importance of local government capacity in the Aceh Province with regard to the sustainability of the post-disaster reconstruction assets.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 10 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Dewan Md Zahurul Islam

Economic growth is defined as growth in the capacity to meet individual and collective consumption demands. Decline in economic growth for a longer period (i.e. recession…

Abstract

Purpose

Economic growth is defined as growth in the capacity to meet individual and collective consumption demands. Decline in economic growth for a longer period (i.e. recession) occurs as a part of the “The Limits of Growth” concept. During such an economic crisis, three policy concepts can be implemented: “austerity”; “business as usual”; and “fiscal stimulus”. The purpose of this paper is to examine the economic response to the 2008 recession, in the area of sustainable transport system development, in Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The study assesses and identifies the need for investments in transport infrastructure, in particular rail, to remove barriers to developing a sustainable multimodal transport system. Towards this, by analysing secondary data collected from relevant online sources, the paper explores the prospects for sustainable rail freight transport development in Europe, during the recession period. For this, eight EU countries were selected, based on the length of railway lines in use: France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Romania, Spain, Sweden and the UK.

Findings

Investment in five transport infrastructures were examined – road, rail, IWT, maritime ports and airports – and the research finds that overall, the “austerity” policy was implemented for investment in rail infrastructure, whereas a modest “stimulus” policy can be observed for investment in road infrastructure. The average investment in IWT infrastructure had a “stimulus” policy, whereas the average investment in Maritime port and Airport infrastructure suggests a “business as usual” policy. Of the various approaches taken in the recent recession period, European rail transport appears to have fared least well.

Research limitations/implications

To some extent, the research is limited by lack of some data (e.g. data unavailability on the UK airport infrastructure investment from year 2006).

Practical implications

The findings of the research will encourage policy makers in national government to invest in sustainable transport infrastructure.

Originality/value

The study suggests that there is a lack of uniform policy response to the recession, in terms of investment in transport infrastructure, and that there is a significant difference between the policy goals set by the EU – modal shift from road to rail and/ IWT to develop a sustainable transport system – and their practice. The author argues for an integrative, common and action-oriented approach to sustainable rail freight system development, by European countries, to develop effective, Europe-wide rail freight corridors, under schemes such as Horizon 2020 and Shift2Rail.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2018

Liaqat Ali, Jianing Mi, Mussawar Shah, Syed Jamal Shah, Salim Khan, Rizwan Ullah and Kausar Bibi

Road and transportation has a significant role in the prosperity, economic growth and development of a region. The main purpose of this study is to conduct an in-depth…

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1268

Abstract

Purpose

Road and transportation has a significant role in the prosperity, economic growth and development of a region. The main purpose of this study is to conduct an in-depth analysis of local residents’ attitude towards road and transport infrastructure (China–Pakistan economic corridor, CPEC) and the wider economic, social, cultural and environmental impact on local people.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a questionnaire survey from the local people. Factor analysis and structural equation modelling approach were used to test the relation between the observed and latent variables.

Findings

The result discovered that road infrastructure has significant socio-economic and cultural impacts that significantly affect the local people support for CPEC development. It also revealed that more promotion and awareness regarding benefits of the project for dwellers lead to more support of the local residents in the study area.

Practical implications

Information provided by this study will help policymakers to gain local resident support for the project and make policies accordingly for the future projects.

Originality/value

This study investigated the attitude and support of the local people based on the road infrastructure’s social, economic, cultural and environmental impact, which has never been examined in the existing literature.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

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