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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

French Caldwell

The purpose of this paper is to show how the core knowledge management (KM) principles of business focus, accountability and operational support can be applied to

4048

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the core knowledge management (KM) principles of business focus, accountability and operational support can be applied to information risk management to create risk intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at risk intelligence strategy in information governance, the fundamental KM principles – business focus, accountability and operational support.

Findings

The paper finds that a risk intelligence strategy gets the most business value from information governance and information risk management. Developing risk intelligence maximizes the return on value from information risk management investments.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in showing how enterprises can get started on implementing a risk intelligence strategy.

Details

VINE, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Randy Borum, John Felker, Sean Kern, Kristen Dennesen and Tonya Feyes

This paper aims to highlight the importance and role of strategic cyber intelligence to support risk-informed decision-making, ultimately leading to improved objectives…

3202

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the importance and role of strategic cyber intelligence to support risk-informed decision-making, ultimately leading to improved objectives, policies, architectures and investments to advance a nation or organization’s interests in the cyber domain.

Design/methodology/approach

Integration of professional research literature from the fields of intelligence studies, strategy and information/computer security.

Findings

Investing in technology, firewalls and intrusion detection systems is appropriate but, by itself, insufficient. Intelligence is a key component. Cyber intelligence emphasizes prevention and anticipation, to focus cybersecurity efforts before an attack occurs (“left of the hack”). Strategic cyber intelligence can substantially reduce risk to the organization’s mission and valued assets and support its due diligence.

Originality/value

This paper describes how strategic cyber intelligence can be implemented and used within an enterprise to enhance its cyber defense, and create a more proactive and adaptive security posture. It not only describes strategic cyber intelligence as a distinct discipline, but also demonstrates how the key intelligence functions articulate with existing cybersecurity risk management standards.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Susan Gasson and Katherine M. Shelfer

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to reconcile the contradiction between two paradigms employed in analyzing IT‐related change requirements: knowledge‐as‐thing…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to reconcile the contradiction between two paradigms employed in analyzing IT‐related change requirements: knowledge‐as‐thing versus knowledge‐as‐process.

Design/methodology/approach

These tensions are explored in the high‐risk decision‐making environment of an Immigration and Naturalization Service agency. The study combines competitive intelligence risk‐analysis methods with an ethnographic analysis of knowledge‐flows, to determine how the roles of human decision‐makers may be supported effectively by ICT‐based knowledge support.

Findings

The findings demonstrate how high‐risk decision‐making may be analyzed as a integrated hybrid human/ICT intelligence system. The study exposes detailed mechanisms by which knowledge of different forms is transferred, exposing failures in training, interpersonal communications, ICT system support, and reward structures. Four roles for ICT support are identified, to supplement human intelligence effectively.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on an investigation across knowledgeable experts in various geographical locations, functional contexts, and organizational roles in a single government agency. Future research could seek to explore whether our distinctions between knowledge types and ICT‐roles are transferable across different organizations.

Practical implications

Four stages of analysis for a hybrid intelligence framework are suggested: risk‐category identification; the application of risk‐categories to decision‐cases; testing and adapting categorizations against global conditions; and transfer of locally‐meaningful categorizations of risk across communities of practice.

Originality/value

The contributions of this paper are: to provide a taxonomy for the analysis of organizational knowledge‐flows; and to suggest a framework for the analysis of roles for human vs. ICT knowledge management in distributed, high‐risk decision‐making environments.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Udechukwu Ojiako

The purpose of this paper is exploratory. The author seeks to put forward propositions on how firms may best conceive business risks in an environment characterised by…

1000

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is exploratory. The author seeks to put forward propositions on how firms may best conceive business risks in an environment characterised by constant change and uncertainty. To construct such a reality, the author examines how the military manages its engagement with strategic risk and uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a summated examination of literature published over the last four decades covering three major areas of management literature; risk management, competitive strategy and military tactics are conducted.

Findings

The propositions which are put forward provide the foundation for the empirical development of an appropriate framework for strategic risk management.

Originality/value

The major contribution of the study is that it has focused readers on not only strategic risk and competition, but on how lessons can be drawn from the military's experience of dealing with irregular forms of competition.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Alessandro Bucciol, Federico Guerrero and Dimitra Papadovasilaki

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between financial risk-taking and trait emotional intelligence (EI).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between financial risk-taking and trait emotional intelligence (EI).

Design/methodology/approach

An incentivized online survey was conducted to collect the data, including measurements for cognitive ability and socio-demographic characteristics.

Findings

There is a positive correlation between trait EI and financial risk-taking that is at least as large as that between risk-taking and measures of cognitive control (CRT). Trait EI is a key determinant of risk-taking. However, not all components of trait EI play an identical role. In fact, we observe positive effects of well-being, mainly driven by males and sociability. Self-control seems to matter only for males.

Research implications/limitations

This study suffers from the bias of self-reported answers, a common limitation of all survey studies.

Practical implications

This evidence provides a noncognitive explanation for the typically observed heterogeneity of financial risk-taking, in addition to more established explanations linked to cognitive skills. Investor profiles should be also determined on their trait EI.

Social implications

Governments should start programs meant to improve the level of trait EI to ameliorate individual wealth outcomes. Female investors participation in the financial markets might increase by fostering their sociability.

Originality/value

The relationship between trait EI and each of its components with financial risk-taking is vastly unexplored, while it is the first time that gender effects are discussed in that set up.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2020

Moshood D. Taofeeq, A.Q. Adeleke and Chia-Kuang LEE

The main parties in construction projects are the engineers, clients, architects, contractors, material suppliers, and consultants such as the project managers. They play…

Abstract

Purpose

The main parties in construction projects are the engineers, clients, architects, contractors, material suppliers, and consultants such as the project managers. They play the most important roles in implementing construction projects, and their activities have a significant impact on their risk attitudes during the execution of projects. Because each participant has their particular interests, by proprietary information, each participant is driven to achieve maximum benefit, which can result in improper behaviour concerning each other. The risk in this situation is that there would be a moral hazard and adverse selection based on information asymmetry among principal construction participants especially contractors; this outcome is called risk attitudes. Behaviour is affected by various risk factors and the successful implementation of construction projects depends on effective management of the key risk factors part of which is a personal factor. The purpose of this paper is to identify the critical factors affecting contractors’ risk attitudes among Malaysian construction companies with the moderating role of government policy. Organizational control theory and expected utility theory were used to develop the theoretical framework. The study investigated G7 contractors in the Malaysian construction industry. Data were collected through the use of a questionnaire.

Design/methodology/approach

The research analysis was based on structural equation modelling (SEM), and the research model was ascertained through the Smart PLS 3.0 software (Ringle et al., 2012). Partial least square-SEM is an appropriate analysis that was used to assess the results in the current research because its algorithm permits the unrestricted computation of cause-effect relationship models that use both reflective and formative measurement models. This study uses the quantitative method to identify the individual factors influencing contractors’ risk attitude and the moderating role of government policy among construction companies in Malaysia. This study also focussed on the G7 contractors operating in the Malaysia construction industry that specializes in building, bridge and road construction projects. The duration of the data collection was between two and three weeks. The questionnaire was prepared both in Malay and English languages to allow the respondents to respond most conveniently. Before the copies of the questionnaire were distributed, the selected contractors’ committees were duly informed about the details of the survey procedures. The adopted Likert scale was originally a five-point scale that ranges from “very low” to “very high” with “low or high” in between.

Findings

The result of this study moderately supports the hypothesized relationships proposed in the theoretical model. In particular, the results recommended that personal factors that affect risk attitudes (working experience, emotional intelligence, professional competence and physical health) have a significant relation with contractors’ risk attitudes in the construction companies in Malaysia. Also, it has been found that government policy (rules and regulations) are important determinants of risk attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

The study focussed on individual factors affecting contractors’ risk attitudes in the construction company’s in Malaysia. Therefore, the dimensions of factors affecting risk attitudes can be used in another aspect of construction projects such as management factors, economic factors and technical factors. Therefore, further research might investigate other grades of Malaysian construction companies apart from Grade 7 contractors to know if there is a similarity in the results; other grades of the contractors might have potential positive contributions to the construction industry as well.

Practical implications

With consider to the practical, the current research findings have several contributions for the contractors and project managers. The research results demonstrate that government policy plays an important role in the construction industry and organizational support will also help contractors to control their attitudes in working place. Individual factor has a direct relationship with contractor risk attitudes (CRA), project managers must ensure that the government policy has an impact in all their workers and offered is competitive, fair and by their employees’ contribution. Apart from that managers should also focus on organizational goals especially in managing professional and skilled contractors in the companies. Employees who perceived their employers as uncaring or not supporting their needs and well-being may not be happy working with the organization and the tendency for them to change their attitudes towards risk will be high.

Social implications

This study also contributes knowledge by lending empirical support to the organizational control theory and expected utility theory system’s effect on CRA and confirming that changing one individual attitude will change the whole equilibrium. This is useful to aid in further synthesis of organizational control theory and expected utility theory in construction companies.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt at evaluating the direct and moderating effect relationships among individual factor affecting risk attitudes, government policy and CRA in Malaysian construction companies. These findings also prop up the applicability of the organizational control theory and expected utility theory within the context of construction companies in Malaysia. Also, this study contributed to the literature on psychology by subjective (psychological) measures of individuals’ behaviour and decisions. In the CRA literature, there has been much discussion on personal characteristics to understand behaviours such as attitudes of a contractor towards risk and morals.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Barry Rider

This paper aims to address in a comparative context the role of intelligence in law enforcement and in particular the significance of intelligence‐led policing.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address in a comparative context the role of intelligence in law enforcement and in particular the significance of intelligence‐led policing.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion is based on the experience of the author over the last 40 years in working in and with law enforcement authorities in a number of countries in establishing specialised agencies and units to address serious and complex criminal activity. The paper was presented as a key note address at an inter‐governmental meeting in Buenos Aires in July 2012 of prosecutor generals and senior prosecutorial officials in South America.

Findings

The role of intelligence is seen as of critical importance to the efficacy of such initiatives. Drawing on his experience, the author poses some serious questions as to whether what is normally understood by the concept of intelligence‐led policing is correct.

Research limitations/implications

The personal observations of the author will hopefully contribute to the discussion of an important aspect of law enforcement upon which very little has been written from the perspective of the intelligence community.

Practical implications

The author looks in particular at the difficulties that have arisen as a result of the interaction of different aspects of the legal system, for the flow and reliability of financial information. In particular, he addresses a number of recent cases before the English courts on the liability of those who handle other people's wealth.

Originality/value

The paper, based on the author's experience over the last 40 years, should contribute to the discussion of an important aspect of law enforcement upon which very little has been written from the perspective of the intelligence community.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Seena Sharp

Did you ever make a business decision without all the facts? Did you learn something after you implemented your decision that you would have changed had you known it…

1104

Abstract

Did you ever make a business decision without all the facts? Did you learn something after you implemented your decision that you would have changed had you known it sooner? If the answer to either question is “Yes”, chances are you lost money, time, morale and the competitive advantage. All of these could easily be avoided with business intelligence.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 January 2020

Desheng Dash Wu

1077

Abstract

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the ability of a computer system to sense, reason, and respond to the environment. Computer systems with advanced AI can engage…

Abstract

Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the ability of a computer system to sense, reason, and respond to the environment. Computer systems with advanced AI can engage in sensing, reasoning, and responding in the most complex and dynamic environments. AI systems are being adapted rapidly by organizations to help manage their workforce. The reason for the popularity of AI is twofold. One, organizations now have access to huge amounts of data (i.e., big data) about their business operations which can be leveraged to make more efficient and effective management decisions. Two, advances in AI now afford organizations the ability to capture and process this data in real-time. Organizations can now incorporate the latest information into their decision making even in the most complex and dynamic competitive markets. Despite this, management through AI also presents new challenges to employees who are now both directed and held accountable by AI.

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

1 – 10 of over 36000