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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Maureen Bourassa, Kelton Doraty, Loleen Berdahl, Jana Fried and Scott Bell

Research on emotion in the context of risk perception has historically focused on negative emotions, and has emphasized the effect of these negative emotions on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on emotion in the context of risk perception has historically focused on negative emotions, and has emphasized the effect of these negative emotions on the perception of risk amongst those who oppose (rather than support) contentious issues. Drawing on theory, the purpose of this paper is to hypothesize that both positive and negative emotions are correlated with risk perceptions regarding contentious public issues and that this occurs amongst supporters and opponents alike.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the relationship between emotions and perceived risk through consideration of the highly contentious case of nuclear energy in Saskatchewan, Canada. The analysis uses data from a representative telephone survey of 1,355 residents.

Findings

The results suggest that positive emotions, like negative emotions, are related to nuclear energy risk perceptions. Emotions are related to risk perception amongst both supporters and opponents.

Research limitations/implications

The data set’s limited number of emotion measures and single public issue focus, combined with the survey’s cross-sectional design, make this research exploratory in nature. Future research should incorporate multiple positive emotions, explore opposition, and support across a range of contentious public issues, and consider experimental models to assess causal relationships.

Practical implications

The paper offers insights into how public sector managers must be cognizant of the emotional underpinnings of risk perceptions amongst both supporters and opponents of contentious public issues.

Originality/value

This paper builds on and expands previous work by considering both positive and negative emotions and both supporters and opponents of contentious issues.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Lynn J. Frewer, Chaya Howard and Richard Shepherd

Discusses the importance of effective risk‐benefit communication about genetic engineering in food production. The consumer, industry and science are all likely to benefit…

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1637

Abstract

Discusses the importance of effective risk‐benefit communication about genetic engineering in food production. The consumer, industry and science are all likely to benefit from the creation of an “informed consumer”. There is a need to develop strategies to maximize the effectiveness of such communication, in order to reach target audiences. Risk‐benefit communication is likely to require a different approach to that which has evolved from the communication of risk information alone. Investigates future research needs and concludes that risk‐benefit communication will usefully invoke public debate about future directions for technological evolution and development.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Anna Saba, Simona Rosati and Marco Vassallo

This paper presents the findings of an empirical work on attitudes towards the application of the gene technology to food production in Italy. It focuses on the importance…

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1938

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of an empirical work on attitudes towards the application of the gene technology to food production in Italy. It focuses on the importance of perception of risks, benefits and uncertainty in determining general attitude to foods produced by genetic engineering. Also, the role of general attitudes and perceived moral obligation in influencing the expectation of consuming foods produced by gene technology was analysed. A mail survey was organised and 434 subjects completed the questionnaires. The results revealed that more people had unfavourable attitudes towards the application of genetic engineering to food production than favourable. More people indicated low benefits than high, more people reported high risks than low risks. Also, more people agreed that there is high uncertainty about potential consequences by genetic engineering than certainty. The findings of regression analyses showed that the perception of benefits outweighed perception of risks in the impact on general attitudes towards the applications of genetic engineering to food production, whereas the perception of uncertainty contributed marginally to the prediction of attitudes. General attitudes appeared to be an important determinant of the expectation of consuming food produced by genetic engineering.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Vikas Gupta and Manohar Sajnani

The purpose of this paper is to discover the numerous risk and benefit perceptions involved in the patrons’ purchase and consumption decisions related to wine in India. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discover the numerous risk and benefit perceptions involved in the patrons’ purchase and consumption decisions related to wine in India. It will also recognise and find out the motives behind the consumers’ drinking patterns and attitude towards wine, which affect their overall behavioural intentions (word of mouth and repurchase intentions).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a structured survey questionnaire from the 375 wine patrons in Delhi. Exploratory factor analysis was used in which the risk (five) and benefit (two) factors related to wine consumption were verified on a factor model using 25 constructs. It was a two-phase process in which the measurement model, with six constructs and 18 measurement items, were measured, trailed by the structural model. A conceptual framework was used to illustrate the relationships amongst the variables and was empirically verified.

Findings

The findings revealed that the risk and benefit perceptions of the wine patrons are not only interlinked but are also accountable for their fluctuations in attitudes. In the factorial analysis, it was discovered that perceived benefit factors, i.e. value for money and convenience, are accountable for positively affecting the attitudes of patrons towards the wines. The results also specify that an increase in benefit perception or decrease in risk perception will positively transform the patrons’ attitude towards wine.

Originality/value

Although a few studies have been done to find out the risk/benefit perceptions of wine consumers in the developed countries (i.e. USA, France, UK, etc.) but this will be the first attempt to find out how the consumption patterns and purchase decisions of wine consumers are affected in developing countries like India. Moreover, it will help the stakeholders to align their wine products as per the needs and demands of the patrons.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2018

Vikas Gupta, Kavita Khanna and Raj Kumar Gupta

This study aims to find out various dimensions of the risk and benefit perceptions of the consumers of street food vendors. It will identify the reasons which affect…

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2041

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to find out various dimensions of the risk and benefit perceptions of the consumers of street food vendors. It will identify the reasons which affect consumer’s attitude and consumption patterns towards street foods, which bring about changes in their behavioural intentions (repurchase intention and word of mouth intention).

Design/methodology/approach

Five risk and two benefit factors were tested on a factor model by exploratory factor analysis using 26 constructs. Two-step approach was followed in which measurement model, having six constructs with 17 measurement items, were assessed, followed by the structural model. This study explained that the consumer attitude is affected by perceived risks and benefits. Further, the risk perception negatively affects the behavioural intentions. A conceptual model was framed to depict the relationships among variables and was empirically tested.

Findings

The results indicate that risk and benefit perception of consumers are not only inter-related but also responsible for their changes in attitudes towards the street foods. In the factorial analysis, it was found that perceived benefit factors, i.e. convenience and value, are responsible for positively influencing the attitude of consumers towards street food. The findings indicate that reducing risk perception and increasing benefit perception will positively change the patron’s attitude.

Originality/value

The data collection was done through a structured questionnaire specifically drafted to collect the relevant data for the study from the 658 street food consumers in Delhi. To examine the factorability of 26 items of risk/benefit perception, 586 observations were used.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 73 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Dilip Babasaheb Kajale and Tilman C. Becker

The aim of this paper is to understand young consumers' (students') opinions about the mandatory labeling policy for genetically modified foods (GMF), and in-depth…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to understand young consumers' (students') opinions about the mandatory labeling policy for genetically modified foods (GMF), and in-depth analysis of determinants of young consumer support for this policy.

Design/methodology/approach

Consumer survey was conducted by using a face to face interview method for a sample of 298 students. The hypotheses of this study are risk benefit perceptions and concerns about the current labeling policy likely to determine students' support for mandatory labeling of GMF. The questionnaire employed for the survey mainly focuses on the questions such as students' perceptions about GMF and opinions about current labeling policy in India. Probit model was used to analyze the determinants of young consumers' support for this policy.

Findings

The authors found that 58 per cent of the students support mandatory labeling of GMF and 39 per cent of the students are willing to pay 10-15 per cent more price for foods under this policy. Young consumers who have knowledge about GM technology are more likely to support this policy. Young consumers' dissatisfaction with the current labeling, and demand for information about food production have a positive influence on support for this policy. Those young consumers who use food labels regularly are likely to support this policy and young consumers' trust in university for truthful information about GMF has a positive influence. Whereas, students' risk benefits perception and moral concerns about GMF have an insignificant influence.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study are that it focused only on university students and used small sample size. Hence, further studies are recommended for overall consumer representative sample.

Practical implications

The findings of this study will be helpful for further research on consumers and mandatory labeling of GMF in India, and also provide some useful information for marketing of GMF in India.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge this is the first study that analyzes the determinants of young consumers' support for mandatory labeling policy for GMF in India.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2020

Vikas Gupta and Shelley Duggal

This study aims to identify various risk and benefit perceptions related to the consumers’ use and selection of online food delivery applications (OFDAs) in India. It also…

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1706

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify various risk and benefit perceptions related to the consumers’ use and selection of online food delivery applications (OFDAs) in India. It also discovers the reasons behind consumers’ OFDAs selection behaviour and how it influences their inclusive attitudes and behavioural intentions (word of mouth and re-use intentions).

Design/methodology/approach

Responses from 337 OFDAs users were subjected to exploratory factor analysis for 5 risk and 2 benefit factors which were tested on a factor model using 31 constructs followed by the structural model.

Findings

It was found that consumers’ usage and selection behaviour related to OFDAs are not only influenced by the perceived risk and benefit factors but are also responsible for their overall attitudinal and behavioural variations. It was also found that a decrease in risk perception or an increase in benefit perception of consumers will positively influence their overall attitude towards the use of OFDAs.

Originality/value

Though a lot of studies related to OFDAs have been conducted in India, but they were limited to identifying the technology used in the apps, analysing the user interface or promoting them as start-ups. Moreover, previous literature related with the risk/benefit perceptions linked with the OFDAs is addressed towards Western countries such as USA, Italy and UK. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first studies that explored the risk/benefit perceptions related to the use and selection of OFDAs in the context of India. Besides, it may also help the stakeholders in OFDA business to align their OFDA features as per the needs of the consumers.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Aina Ravoniarison

The purpose of this paper is to examine how French senior consumers deal with duality between perceived risk and perceived value associated with functional foods (FFs) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how French senior consumers deal with duality between perceived risk and perceived value associated with functional foods (FFs) and to analyze whether the risk-value trade-off may help to derive different consumer profiles.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 220 senior consumers (50-70). A two-step clustering analysis was carried out on factor scores of perceived value and perceived risk. Discriminant analysis was then employed to verify the classification reliability, and analysis of variance was performed to profile the clusters on the basis of additional variables.

Findings

Four distinctive profiles of FF senior consumers were identified. Significant differences were found to be attributed to personality traits. Interestingly, the “Trustful enthusiasts” and the “Ambivalents” consumers do not differ in their repurchase intention, despite a significant discrepancy in risk perception.

Practical implications

The study is an opportunity to offer a segmentation of this attractive growing target of health-enhancing products. The typology can help the practitioners to find out a new valuable scope of messages to better communicate to elderly market.

Originality/value

The research seeks to contribute to the existing knowledge on seniors’ nutrition-related behavior, by proposing a segmentation still lacking in research works. Since FF perceived value appears to be multidimensional and not only utilitarian, the study provides a new insight into the experiential approach of health-enhancing eating. Also, it shows how the differences between FF consumers could be attributed to certain personal variables.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Jo-Yun Li and Yeunjae Lee

This study seeks to address the question on the role of information-seeking behavior in dealing with uncertainty on workplace health disclosure from the perspectives of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to address the question on the role of information-seeking behavior in dealing with uncertainty on workplace health disclosure from the perspectives of internal communication.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with 409 full-time employees in large-sized companies in the United States.

Findings

The results showed that employees engage in proactive and passive information-seeking strategies when they are uncertain about their supervisors' reactions toward their health problems. Positive EOR and organizational climate would increase their intention to adopt inquiry strategy, whereas negative EOR and the climate would increase their intention to adopt monitoring strategy. Employees who adopt inquiry strategy tend to perceive the benefits of health disclosure, whereas those who adopt monitoring strategy tend to perceive the risks of health disclosure. If employees perceived increased benefits in terms of health disclosure, then they tend to disclose their health problems to their supervisors, and vice versa.

Originality/value

This study is among first to investigate workplace health disclosure decision-making from the perspectives of internal communication. These findings highlight the importance of excellent internal communications in employees' health disclosure decision-making process and support the proposition that proactive information-seeking is a strategy that contributes to uncertainty management in the workplace. This study also provides significant practical guidelines for corporate communication practitioners and leaders by establishing a safe and friendly environment where employees feel comfortable to disclose their health problems to supervisors.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Dilek Cetindamar, Bülent Çatay and O. Serdar Basmaci

To gain an understanding of the benefits, bridges, and barriers associated with supply chain collaboration.

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3669

Abstract

Purpose

To gain an understanding of the benefits, bridges, and barriers associated with supply chain collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

Insights from extensive field research of a successful collaboration example in the Turkish dyeing and finishing industry.

Findings

The competition among firms is increasingly shifting from company vs company to supply chain vs supply chain. The insights obtained from the collaborative model in this textile supply chain provide a good understanding of the benefits, bridges, and barriers associated with supply chain collaboration. Benefits can be grouped as customer‐oriented benefits, productivity benefits, and innovation related benefits. Factors supporting collaboration are observed as trust, common goals for cooperation, and existence of cooperation mechanisms, while barriers are related to three factors: lack of trust, risk‐benefit evaluation, and lack of common goals for cooperation.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are based on interviews and questionnaires conducted with the managers of 3T, 30 dyeing and finishing firms (ten are partners) and six technology‐supplying partner firms, from various regions in Turkey.

Practical implications

Highlights the importance of trust and collaboration mechanisms in managing collaborations. As the case of 3T in the dyeing and finishing industry shows, collaborations might significantly contribute to the competitiveness of textile firms.

Originality/value

This paper presents a successful collaboration model in creating new technologies and products by bringing the resources of competing partners together. This collaboration might be a tool for firms in developing countries to become competitive in their respective industries at the global level.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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