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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Deepa P., Meena Laad, Sangita and Rina Singh

The purpose of this paper is to study the recent work carried out in enhancing the properties of bitumen using nano-additives. Bitumen is a by-product obtained from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the recent work carried out in enhancing the properties of bitumen using nano-additives. Bitumen is a by-product obtained from the refining process of crude oil, therefore making it a diminishing product. It has been used by mankind since ages for various applications like sealants, binders, waterproof coatings and pavement construction material. It is a black viscous substance with adhesive nature.

Design/methodology/approach

Bitumen is used as a binding material because of its ability to become liquid when heated and become solid when cooled and thus used largely in construction of roads because of its unique properties. Low softening point of bitumen leads to melting of bitumen during summer and causes rutting of roads, whereas during winter it leads to cracking as bitumen acts brittle in nature during low temperature. Increasing global demand of bitumen has created gap between demand and supply which is increasing with the passage of time. Further modern life has created very high traffic volume and heavy load which makes it essential to improve performance of bitumen.

Findings

Research studies have reported that the thermal properties of bitumen are enhanced by using thermoplastic polymers such as styrene-butadiene-styrene, polyethylene and ethylene-vinyl acetate, rubber and bio waste etc.

Originality/value

This paper reviews various types of materials which have been used to improve the properties of bitumen and explores the possibility to synthesise bitumen composite materials with nanoadditives with improved structural, mechanical and thermal properties.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2010

Rina Makgosa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the effects of sex role orientation (SRO) on conflict resolution strategies vary across ethnic groups.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the effects of sex role orientation (SRO) on conflict resolution strategies vary across ethnic groups.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used with a sample of 295 husbands and 288 wives of British White, Indian and African Black origin residents of London and Manchester in the UK.

Findings

The results showed that SRO had a significant impact on conflict resolution strategies for both husbands and wives across the three British ethnic groups. A modern SRO encourages bargaining within all the three ethnic groups and playing on emotion, disengagement and assertiveness for Indians and African Black husbands. In addition, a modern SRO increases bargaining for African Blacks wives and playing on emotion, supplication and assertiveness for British Whites wives.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, the paper provides substantial evidence of differences in the use of conflict resolution strategies by husbands and wives from the three ethnic groups.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to knowledge about differences in the effects of SRO on conflict resolution strategies used in joint purchase decisions for major household durables in a multicultural country.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Ajay Das and Rina Shah

Similar to Western countries, the early origins of special education in India started with Christian missionaries and nongovernmental agencies which stressed a charity…

Abstract

Similar to Western countries, the early origins of special education in India started with Christian missionaries and nongovernmental agencies which stressed a charity model of serving populations such as the visually, hearing, and cognitively impaired. However after its independence from Great Britain in 1947, the Indian government became more involved in providing educational, rehabilitation, and social services. Thus over the past four decades, India has moved gradually toward an inclusive education model. This chapter discusses the implementation of such a model related to the prevalence and incidence rates of disability in India as well as working within family environments that often involve three to four generations. Also included are challenges that an inclusive education system faces in India, namely, a high level of poverty, appropriate teacher preparation of special education teachers, a lack of binding national laws concerned with inclusive education, a dual governmental administration for special education services, and citizen’s and special education professionals strong concern about whether inclusive education practices can be carried out.

Details

Special Education International Perspectives: Practices Across the Globe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-096-4

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Rina Agarwala

Purpose – This chapter illustrates how an economic sociology of work exposes the deeply embedded nature of the informal economy and the social and political lives of its…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter illustrates how an economic sociology of work exposes the deeply embedded nature of the informal economy and the social and political lives of its growing mass of unprotected workers under globalization. In particular, the premises of economic sociology offer a comprehensive definition of the informal economy that I term, “relational.” In contrast to definitions based on modernization and neoliberal assumptions of isolated economies, relational definitions of the informal economy expose the structures, networks, and political institutions that intertwine informal workers with the formal economy, society, and the state. Operationalizing the relational definition in labor surveys ensures the inclusion of previously invisible informal workers, especially those who operate at the intersection of the informal and formal economy. As well, it ensures the collection of data on the precise ways in which informal workers are socially and politically embedded, including their collective action efforts, the meaning they attach to their labor, and the social networks that determine their life chances.

Methodology – To illustrate this point, I apply a relational definition of informal labor to the case of India, using the National Sample Survey on Employment and Unemployment, as well as findings from interviews with organized informal workers.

Findings – By doing so, I provide an internationally comparative measure of India's informal workforce, illustrate informal workers’ social conditions relative to those of formal workers, highlight the expansion of the informal workforce since the government enacted liberalization reforms, and expose the unique political action strategies Indian informal workers are launching against the state.

Implications/Originality – These findings help us understand Indian informal workers in an internationally comparative context, yielding empirical insights on their social conditions and political organizations for the first time. As well, they call for an important refinement to existing definitions of the informal economy that to date have relied only on Latin American and African experiences.

Details

Economic Sociology of Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-368-2

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Prashant Sahni, Savita Sharma and Baljit Singh

Meal left after extraction of microalgae functional compounds is not finding its application in food. Hence, present study was aimed for the development of the cookies…

Abstract

Purpose

Meal left after extraction of microalgae functional compounds is not finding its application in food. Hence, present study was aimed for the development of the cookies supplemented with meal of microalgae Chlorella sp. (Abca-17) obtained after solvent extraction of chlorophyll.

Design/methodology/approach

Cookies were prepared by substituting refined wheat flour (RWF) with microalgae meal (MM) at incorporation levels of 3, 6, 9 and 12 per cent. The effect of replacement of RWF with MM was analyzed on the pasting properties of the flour blends and physical, chemical, sensory and textural characteristics of the cookies.

Findings

MM exhibited high water and oil absorption capacity of 0.8 g/g and 1.2 g/g, respectively. Weight and thickness of the cookies increased, whereas the diameter, spread ratio and spread factor decreased with the increased proportion of meal in flour blends. The moisture and ash content (0.8-2.0 per cent) of the cookies increased, whereas fat content showed no pronounced variation. Sensory evaluation of cookies revealed no significant difference at 6 per cent level of incorporation and further supplementation resulted in dark colour and increased hardness. Texture profile analysis of cookies also revealed that the peak positive force for breaking the cookies increased (3115.6-7372.1 N) with increase in the level of incorporation of meal.

Practical implications

MM can be used in the development of the cookies at level of incorporation of 6 per cent and presents novice approach for utilization of bioprocessing waste.

Originality/value

The present study is a pioneer effort in demonstration of utilization of MM as alternate food ingredient. MM of Chlorella sp. (Abca-17) was characterized as food ingredient using physicochemical analysis and model food system using cookies.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Riccardo Armillei and Bruno Mascitelli

Until the early 1970s the infamous ‘White Australia Policy’ restricted certain types of migrants from entering Australia, particularly those of Asian background, with the…

Abstract

Until the early 1970s the infamous ‘White Australia Policy’ restricted certain types of migrants from entering Australia, particularly those of Asian background, with the goal of creating an ‘Anglo-Celtic’ Australian nation. Post-war mass migration, mostly from Europe, had a significant impact on the ethnic composition of the population. Despite attempts to enforce a mostly ‘British’ migration, the resulting programme would see migrants come from many non-British source countries. This ultimately pressured the government into recognition of cultural diversity and eventually in the early 1970s through the proposition of a multicultural approach. In 1973 multiculturalism was officially introduced slowly becoming a defining national asset. From 1933 to 2001, Italians were the second largest migrant group contributing to Australia’s cultural ‘make-up’, right after the ‘Anglo-Celtic’ segment of the overseas-born population (UK, New Zealand and Ireland). However, the Italian migration of the 1950s and 1960s is a closed chapter of Australian migration history, and Australia now embraces migration from countries where it was initially rejected in the pre-1970s period – Asians, particularly those from China and India. While looking at the specific cases of Italian and Chinese settlement in Australia, this chapter also provides an historical overview of Australian migration policies. We argue that the gradual inclusion of non-British migrants in Australia has been guided since 1901 Federation by a form of ‘economic opportunism’ rather than a real intention to change the ethnic make-up of the population and identity of the nation. Despite forming and maintaining strategic partnerships with Asian countries, migration to Australia is still dominated by the need to preserve a distinctive ‘Anglo-Celtic’ character.

Details

Living in Two Homes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-781-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Rina Makgosa

The current study seeks to explore ethnic diversity in Britain by investigating the strength of ethnic identity and acculturation levels of two British ethnic minority…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study seeks to explore ethnic diversity in Britain by investigating the strength of ethnic identity and acculturation levels of two British ethnic minority groups – Indians and African Blacks. The study also aims to examine the role of demographic characteristics in explaining the strength of ethnic identity and acculturation levels between the surveyed ethnic groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a survey research design. Data was collected using a personally administered structured questionnaire from a convenience sample of 365 married ethnic members.

Findings

The results of t‐tests revealed that both Indians and African Blacks are strong ethnic identifiers and highly‐acculturated. Further results based on step‐wise regressions showed that age and income offer more explanatory power of ethnic diversity among African Blacks and Indians respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The study highlights the complexity and importance of ethnicity in the development of multicultural strategies in Britain.

Originality/value

Research relating to ethnic diversity in Britain is relatively limited and of the very few studies available, there has been more emphasis on qualitative research approaches. This study also offers findings on ethnicity at a time when there is growth in the population of ethnic markets in Britain.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Case study
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Sameera Mohamed Al Zaidi and Syed Zamberi Ahmad

By reading and understanding the case study, Students will be able to link the importance of healthy life style and the physical exercise to the fitness industry in the…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

By reading and understanding the case study, Students will be able to link the importance of healthy life style and the physical exercise to the fitness industry in the UAE society, to reduce the growing percentage of obesity and related diseases; identify the main challenges of Tone Fitness Ladies’ Studio (Tone); explore the market segmentation of fitness centers in UAE based on a benefits segmentation of fitness industry; identify the demographic segmentation of Tone Fitness studio and the effects of considering gender and age; and develop individual perspectives of how Tone Fitness ladies’ studio may overcome the challenges to compete in the UAE fitness market.

Case overview/synopsis

Three sisters from the United Arab Emirates (Hind, Mariam and Amna Mohamed Omer) have established a fitness studio for women in Al Maqta’a (formerly known as Bain al Jasrain) on the eastern side of Abu Dhabi. Each of them shared a passion for sport, which led them to realize their business idea of setting up a fitness studio specifically for women. An understanding of Emirati culture and the needs of women in their society inspired them to think of a special place where women could find relief from work and life demands while also exercising pursuant of a healthy lifestyle. They launched Tone Ladies’ Fitness Studio (Tone) in September 2014, the first fitness studio for women in Al Maqta’a. The studio is in the same building as a cooperative hypermarket – a very good location because it is visited by many people and has ample parking spaces. Partly due to growing interest among Abu Dhabi residents in fitness and health, new fitness studios opened nearby in 2016, with competitors offering excellent services at reasonable prices. While the demand for fitness and healthy lifestyle pursuits is high in the region, the market has also expanded greatly to meet this demand, with many high-quality options becoming available. As a result of this, businesses such as Tone are facing serious threats to their sustainability. Thus, first, how can the Omer sisters sustain their business and strategize to maintain customers in their market segment? Second, what could they do to improve the market position of Tone in the UAE fitness market?

Complexity academic level

This case study is suitable for advanced level of diploma certificate in marketing or undergraduate student of marketing field.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Zul-Atfi Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the development of an integrated computerised maintenance management system to improve the information storage of design and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the development of an integrated computerised maintenance management system to improve the information storage of design and construction, diagnostic and defect risk assessments on IBS building through the integration of building information modelling (BIM).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used interviews with the IBS building client/maintenance contractor in Malaysia to gather information about maintenance management problems, approaches to address problems, information and communication technology implementation and use of emerging technologies, in addition to prototyping a system development life cycle for system development.

Findings

Relevant process flowchart documents of system development were obtained from the case study and reviewed to assist in providing an automation technique for decision-making and structural defect diagnostic operation through the integration of Visual Basic.Net, MS Access and Autodesk Revit software.

Originality/value

This research focuses on automatic bidirectional communications between an Expert System and BIM on a database level. Adoption of the approaches suggested in the research will enable the system to promote the development of zero IBS building maintenance.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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