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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Riina Koris and Iris Kollinger

This research identifies the factors which motivate (or not) European Millennial students to accept work-related mobility. Insight into preferred length of mobility is…

Abstract

Purpose

This research identifies the factors which motivate (or not) European Millennial students to accept work-related mobility. Insight into preferred length of mobility is also provided.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative self-report survey among 617 Millennial students from Europe. Data analysis for the quantitative survey used exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

Reasons which add to as well as take from mobility willingness remain on the “personal” rather than “professional” side. The European Millennials would rather not accept long-term mobility, primarily for reasons related to family, friends and life in home country.

Practical implications

Organizations should design short-term assignments and enable flexibility for assignees to pursue personal interests while on mobility. Remuneration packages remain among the hygiene factors and organizations may have to adopt an individualized approach while creating mobility offers for the European Millennials.

Originality/value

This study shows which factors should be highlighted while designing work-related mobility offers to the European Millennials. As an original research, it offers highly practical value to organizations, thereby adding to their opportunity for flexibility during societal shifts.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Riina Koris, Hanna-Maija Alalauri and Ülle Pihlak

This paper aims to present the equine leadership principles which horseback riders are successfully using and which can also be successfully used in leadership of people.

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262

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the equine leadership principles which horseback riders are successfully using and which can also be successfully used in leadership of people.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper relies on semi-structured expert interviews with managers–leaders who are also horseback riders.

Findings

Based on the expert interviews, the main equine leadership principles which can effectively be used in leadership of people are trust, fair treatment, calmness, assertiveness, control over one’s feelings, confidence, responsibility, consistency (routine and predictability), courage, sense of empathy, and the ability to express gratitude and praise.

Practical implications

The paper provides a practical insight on relevant leadership principles for leadership trainers, coaches and teachers, as well as executive training organizations who engage in leadership training. It saves busy executives, leadership trainers and teachers hours of reading time by offering concisely the leadership principles which must be fostered in existing and future leaders to make an impact on the employees and contribute toward a better working environment.

Originality/value

To study the topic leadership, this paper uses an innovative and intriguing context (horseback riding) and couples it with the topic of leadership of people.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Iris Kollinger and Riina Koris

The purpose of this study is to identify what (de)motivates millennial students from undertaking mobility upon graduation and whether this depends on gender, region of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify what (de)motivates millennial students from undertaking mobility upon graduation and whether this depends on gender, region of origin, prior work experience, level of studies, or international mindset and how. The paper provides insights on the preferred length of mobility and the most (un)attractive regions.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 1,001 millennial students from 77 countries. Data from a quantitative self-reported survey were analysed employing exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory data analyses.

Findings

Factors that motivate mobility are personal development, learning about foreign cultures and the opportunity to travel and those that demotivate are a preference for short-term assignments, unwillingness of family to move and disruption of home country life. Factors differ by region, gender, level of current studies and the student's international mindset.

Research limitations/implications

The cohort included only students pursuing a business or technical education. A willingness to accept an international assignment may not necessarily translate into accepting an international assignment due to the effect of the attitude–behaviour gap. The authors do not aim to generalise on the basis of the results since the sample was fairly disproportionate in terms of world regions. We do, however, invite further studies to treat ours as potential input for new and emerging studies of either a quantitative or qualitative nature.

Practical implications

Due to a strong attachment to home, short-term assignments are preferred. Salary and financial benefits remain hygienic factors and motivating factors remain on the “soft” side. Motivating millennials to engage in mobility requires an individualised approach, dependent on region of origin, gender, the level of education, work experience and international mindset.

Originality/value

This study indicates that the factors that (de)motivate millennial students to engage in international assignments differ on the basis of various socio-demographic variables.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Riina Koris and Petri Nokelainen

The purpose of this paper is to study Bayesian dependency modelling (BDM) to validate the model of educational experiences and the student-customer orientation…

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1714

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study Bayesian dependency modelling (BDM) to validate the model of educational experiences and the student-customer orientation questionnaire (SCOQ), and to identify the categories of educatonal experience in which students expect a higher educational institutions (HEI) to be student-customer oriented.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a cross-sectional quantitative survey study, mixed methods research, exploratory factor analysis and BDM.

Findings

The validated model of educational experiences and the SCOQ; results indicate that students expect to be treated as customers in some, but not all categories of educational experience.

Research limitations/implications

The authors contribute to existing literature on two fronts: the validated model of educational experiences and the categories of educational experience in which students expect to be treated as customers.

Practical implications

The validated SCOQ presented in the paper may be used by other HEIs to assess the degree to which students expect a particular HEI to be customer oriented. Also, HEIs should assess students’ expectations concerning student-customer orientation before employing such an approach.

Originality/value

The paper presents a validated model of educational experiences and a SCOQ. Additionally, the study does not investigate whether students expect a HEI as such to be student-customer oriented (as most studies have done so far); instead, the aim is to find out whether, in which categories of educational experience and to what extent students expect a HEI to be student-customer oriented. Thus, the study explores the phenomenon of student-customer orientation at a deeper level, i.e. separately at the level of educational experiences.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Anders Örtenblad and Riina Koris

The purpose of this paper is to examine systematically and reflectively the relevance of four different aspects/types of the learning organization idea to higher…

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2121

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine systematically and reflectively the relevance of four different aspects/types of the learning organization idea to higher educational institutions (HEIs), from three ideal-typical stakeholder perspectives: the managerial perspective, the employee perspective and the societal perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review of 73 prior works on the relevance of the learning organization idea to HEIs, and a systematic examination from different stakeholder perspectives, i.e. an examination based on a “multi-stakeholder contingency approach.”

Findings

The learning organization idea needs to be reformulated to some extent to become fully relevant to HEIs.

Research limitations/implications

The “multi-stakeholder contingency approach” can be used advantageously in any contextualization study of the learning organization idea as well as in contextualizing any other fashionable management idea.

Practical implications

The learning organization idea should not be adopted uncritically by HEIs, nor should it be uncritically rejected. In particular, HEIs should avoid becoming too organic and instead, be moderate when adopting the “learning structure” aspect/type of the learning organization idea.

Social implications

It is recommended that the societal perspective be prioritized, in that HEIs are mainly for society.

Originality/value

In contrast to the previous stock of literature on HEIs as learning organizations, which, generally speaking, is non-cumulative, uncritical, incongruent and unsystematic, this paper systematically and reflectively examines the relevance of various definitions of the learning organization from diverse and explicit stakeholder perspectives.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Brian Roberts

Downloads
85

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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