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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Rick T. Wilson

The purpose of this research is to understand how brand-building is used to lend credibility to investor information and to differentiate countries competing for foreign…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand how brand-building is used to lend credibility to investor information and to differentiate countries competing for foreign investment. Brand signals, such as slogans and logos, are frequently used by governments and their investment promotion agencies to enhance the presentation of information to potential investors interested in acquiring or establishing a business within their country. Yet, little is known about how governments use brand building to foster professionalism and convey their expertise in international expansion assistance and differentiate themselves from one another in an investment promotion context.

Design/methodology/approach

This research content analyzes the slogans and logos found in 55 months of print advertising and on the websites of 181 countries engaged in investment-seeking activities.

Findings

The research finds that slogans and logos are frequently used across both samples, but slogan use is greater in print advertising than on the Web, which is likely because of the greater effort required to develop an advertising campaign than to maintain a website. Regardless of medium, logo use is greater than slogan use. In the sample, slogans tended to be generic or undifferentiated and do not appear to facilitate brand credibility. However, logos were better designed than slogans and incorporated more territorial and cultural symbols and elements of expertise.

Originality/value

This study provides for a deeper understanding of investment promotion, especially, as it relates to brand building both on the Web and in print advertising. It also extends the author’s understanding of brand building within a specialized area of business-to-business organizational buying. From a managerial perspective, the research highlights the need for differentiated slogans and for logos using territorial and cultural symbols to better assist governments with appearing more professional, conveying expertise and differentiating their country from potential rivals.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Rick T. Wilson and Lyn S. Amine

The purpose of this paper is to draw upon the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm in order to assess the “who, when, where, and how” questions about use of resources in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw upon the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm in order to assess the “who, when, where, and how” questions about use of resources in shaping market positioning by global and local firms in a transitional economy (TE).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes a longitudinal case‐study approach to present and discuss resource asymmetry between global and local advertising agencies operating in Hungary.

Findings

RBV proves to be valuable theory, revealing an interesting and unexpected range of sources and types of resources that are being used to advantage by local and global agencies competing in Hungary. Earlier historical asymmetries in resource endowments contributed to a notable division between global and local agencies according to market sector. Specific resources, such as reputation, access to global resources, and use of Western‐style business practices, proved beneficial to global firms after Hungarian market liberalization in 1989, while interpersonal relationships have emerged as a valuable resource, regardless of context.

Research limitations/implications

Use of a convenience cross‐sectional sampling method may contribute to some halo effects and personal bias. Additionally, results may be limited in their applicability only to the advertising industry and to Hungary as a specific TE. Future research should validate these findings in other industries and other TEs.

Practical implications

Findings from this study offer marketing managers operating in TEs fresh insights into how asymmetries in resource endowments at various points in an infant industry's life cycle act to influence choice of market positioning strategies and subsequent success of firms competing in the industry.

Originality/value

This paper provides rich detail of the advertising industry in Hungary, suggesting directions for study of advertising industries in other TEs, not only in Eastern Europe. Results from this study increase confidence in the generalizability of RBV theory by demonstrating its usefulness and flexibility when applied to an unusual context in terms of time and space.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Peter Magnusson, Rick T. Wilson, Srdan Zdravkovic, Joyce Xin Zhou and Stanford A. Westjohn

The purpose of this paper is to examine and compare the validity of different operationalizations of cultural and institutional distance.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and compare the validity of different operationalizations of cultural and institutional distance.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a review of the theoretical background for Hofstede's, Schwartz's, Trompenaars's, and Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness' (GLOBE) cultural frameworks is provided, as well as the institutional environment. Then, the validity of each framework is assessed by evaluating how well each framework groups countries into appropriate clusters, and finally comparisons between the different frameworks are drawn.

Findings

It was found that the cultural distance (CD) constructs based on Hofstede and Trompenaars have strong convergent validity. CD constructs based on Schwartz and GLOBE are found to have the weakest validity. The institutional distance (ID) constructs are conceptualized to be broader than the traditional CD constructs. However, high correlations indicate a strong overlap between ID and CD. Additionally, the ID constructs are highly correlated with factors related to economic development, potentially limiting their usefulness.

Originality/value

Both researchers and practitioners can choose from a variety of CD/ID frameworks to fill their needs; however, variance in the performance between frameworks may lead to faulty conclusions. In response to this need to accurately capture cross‐cultural differences, the validity of nine different operationalizations of CD/ID have been examined. Contrary to popular belief, the traditional CD construct based on Hofstede is shown to compare favorably with other frameworks and calls for the abandonment of this index may be premature.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 August 2019

John Hartley

Philosophers and political theorists have long warned of the “perils of dogmatism” for public discourse and identified intellectual humility as a necessary corrective…

Abstract

Philosophers and political theorists have long warned of the “perils of dogmatism” for public discourse and identified intellectual humility as a necessary corrective. Sufficient intellectual humility encompasses at least four elements: openness to error, recognition of bias, recognition of intellectual parity in interlocutors, and avoidance of recourse to authority. Religions seem to present obstacles on all four fronts, particularly when actors embody more conservative renderings of a given religion’s repertoire. As such, a case involving different groups of religious exclusivists engaging one another on topics that directly interact their deepest faith commitments and political visions presents a useful test case for our theories of intellectual humility. This chapter considers conservative protestants engaging in public discourse with Muslims about whether or not Muslim and Christian understandings of “loving God” and “loving neighbor” have sufficient overlap to support political cooperation. The results of the dialogue effort were a mixture of controversy and cooperation. For evangelicals, the engagement produced sharp conflict and yet helped to shift the community’s plausibility structures, opening further the possibility of fruitful public discourse and strategic action in cooperation with Muslims. The analysis suggests a conceptualization of practical intellectual humility that emphasizes recognition of the other.

Details

Religion, Humility, and Democracy in a Divided America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-949-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Storytelling-Case Archetype Decoding and Assignment Manual (SCADAM)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-216-0

Abstract

Details

The Romance of Heroism and Heroic Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-655-2

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Jon Drabenstott

The library automation marketplace is characterized by five significant realities. The first is the changing status of vendors in the marketplace. The development of…

Abstract

The library automation marketplace is characterized by five significant realities. The first is the changing status of vendors in the marketplace. The development of capabilities and the support of installed systems compete for the same corporate resources, resulting in an evolution in the leadership position of vendors. Second, the market is polarized, containing experienced institutions that are replacing systems and institutions that are entering the market for the first time. Communication within the marketplace is intense, which can contribute to the success of a project; the peer network also can increase the chances of replicating older, proven technologies while making it more difficult for new vendors to enter the marketplace. The institutions that comprise the marketplace are extremely slow to develop their plans and commit their resources. The library automation marketplace is also very small and relatively poor. Library automation vendors must recognize and contend with these realities.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Peter M. Kruyen, Shelena Keulemans, Rick T. Borst and Jan-Kees Helderman

Since the early 1980s, western governments are assumed to have been either moving toward post-bureaucratic models or transforming into so-called neo-Weberian…

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Abstract

Purpose

Since the early 1980s, western governments are assumed to have been either moving toward post-bureaucratic models or transforming into so-called neo-Weberian bureaucracies. As different public-sector (reform) models imply different ideal typical personality traits for civil servants, the purpose of this paper is to ask the question to what extent personality requirements that governments demand from their employees have evolved over time in line with these models.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed the use of big-five traits in a sample of 21,003 job advertisements for local government jobs published between 1980 and 2017, applying tools for computer-assisted text analysis.

Findings

Using multilevel regression analyses, the authors conclude that, over time, there is a significant increase in the use of personality descriptors related to all big-five factors.

Research limitations/implications

The authors postulate that governments nowadays are actively looking for the “renaissance bureaucrat” in line with the neo-Weberian bureaucracy paradigm. The authors end with a discussion of both positive and negative consequences of this development.

Originality/value

First, the authors explicitly link personality, public administration, and public management using the Abridged Big-Five-Dimensional Circumflex model of personality. Second, by linking observed trends in civil servant personality requirements to larger theories of public-sector reform models, the authors narrow the gap between public administration theories and practice. Third, the software tools that the authors use to digitalize and analyze a large number of documents (the job ads) are new to the discipline of public administration. The research can therefore serve as a guideline for scholars who want to use software tools to study large amounts of unstructured, qualitative data.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Kara Michelle Taylor, Evan M. Taylor, Paul Hartman, Rebecca Woodard, Andrea Vaughan, Rick Coppola, Daniel J. Rocha and Emily Machado

This paper aims to examine how a collaborative narrative inquiry focused on cultivating critical English Language Arts (ELA) pedagogies supported teacher agency, or “the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how a collaborative narrative inquiry focused on cultivating critical English Language Arts (ELA) pedagogies supported teacher agency, or “the capacity of actors to critically shape their own responsiveness to problematic situations” (Emirbayer and Mische, 1998, p. 971).

Design/methodology/approach

Situated in a semester-long inquiry group, eight k-16 educators used narrative inquiry processes (Clandinin, 1992) to write and collectively analyze (Ezzy, 2002) stories describing personal experiences that brought them to critical ELA pedagogies. They engaged in three levels of analysis across the eight narratives, including open coding, thematic identification, and identification of how the narrative inquiry impacted their classroom practices.

Findings

Across the narratives, the authors identify what aspects of the ELA reading, writing and languaging curriculum emerged as problematic; situate themselves in systems of oppression and privilege; and examine how processes of critical narrative inquiry contributed to their capacities to respond to these issues.

Research limitations/implications

Collaborative narrative inquiry between teachers and teacher educators (Sjostrom and McCoyne, 2017) can be a powerful method to cultivate critical pedagogies.

Practical implications

Teachers across grade levels, schools, disciplines and backgrounds can collectively organize to cultivate critical ELA pedagogies.

Originality/value

Although coordinated opportunities to engage in critical inquiry work across k-16 contexts are rare, the authors believe that the knowledge, skills and confidence they gained through this professional inquiry sensitized them to oppressive curricular norms and expanded their repertoires of resistance.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2014

Marvin Washington, Harry J. Van Buren and Karen Patterson

Megachurches represent an interesting empirical and conceptual phenomenon. Empirically, megachurches (Protestant churches with average weekly attendance of greater than…

Abstract

Megachurches represent an interesting empirical and conceptual phenomenon. Empirically, megachurches (Protestant churches with average weekly attendance of greater than 2,000 members) are growing at a time when overall church participation in the United States is steady or declining. Conceptually, megachurch pastors can be viewed as institutional leaders who attempt to reconcile new technologies and large congregations within a highly institutionalized setting. While many of these megachurches have a denominational affiliation, some do not. In this essay, we describe the literature on megachurches and offer observations about the megachurch as an institution. Drawing from preliminary analysis of a sample of over 1,400 megachurches (identified from the Hartford Institute for Religious Research), we also draw tentative conclusions about the characteristics of the pastors of megachurches, and one growing institutional maintenance practice: writing texts. We propose that examining megachurches can help extend the current research on institutional leadership, institutional work, and institutional support mechanisms.

Details

Religion and Organization Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-693-4

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