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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Craig Sayers and Richard Paul

Examines work on the development of an undersea remotely operatedvehicle which is both unmanned and untethered. Outlines the difficulty of theonly suitable long‐range…

Abstract

Examines work on the development of an undersea remotely operated vehicle which is both unmanned and untethered. Outlines the difficulty of the only suitable long‐range underwater communication system being an acoustic link which has a very low bandwidth and a very large delay. The teleprogramming system seeks to overcome this difficulty by creating a computer simulation of the remote environment and allowing the operator to perform his task entirely within that simulated world. Describes the operator station, command generation to the ROV, the detection of errors and the hardware implementation. Concludes that the teleprogramming systems provides a means of performing tasks efficiently, even when the communication between operator and remote site occurs via a low bandwidth, high delay, communications link.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Richard Sayers and Annie Talvé

This paper aims to provide an overview of the inaugural CAVAL Horizon Executive Leadership Program from the commencement of planning in 2006 through to the graduation of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of the inaugural CAVAL Horizon Executive Leadership Program from the commencement of planning in 2006 through to the graduation of the first cohort in February 2009.

Design/methodology/approach

In February 2009, the inaugural CAVAL Horizon Executive Leadership Program (Horizon) graduated its first cohort of 12 senior library and information managers from Australia and New Zealand. The inaugural Horizon offered an integrated program of executive learning and development inspired by lighthouse leadership programs within Australia and overseas. The four month Horizon program included two residential workshops (the first at Werribee Park outside Melbourne and the second in Sydney), individual projects, unprecedented access to industry leaders from within the library sector and CEO's from large private companies, and a highly successful series of coaching tele‐workshops. Following their graduation from the program, Horizon alumni have used an e‐list and other networking opportunities to form a strong and mutually supportive community of practice.

Findings

The paper shares a range of insights about the development and facilitation of the program and discusses the critical lessons learned in relation to future executive programs of this type.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates illustrates that Horizon is Australasia's first and currently only executive program specifically designed to prepare senior library and information managers for appointments at director‐level and above.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Abstract

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Library Management, vol. 26 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Richard Sayers

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 27 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 26 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Richard Sayers

The purpose of this paper is to examine selected findings of the 2006 CAVAL Training Needs Survey across Australia, New Zealand and Asia and to assess their implications…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine selected findings of the 2006 CAVAL Training Needs Survey across Australia, New Zealand and Asia and to assess their implications for academic libraries in the context of generational change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper compares 2006 Training Needs Survey data with previous survey data (2004 and 2005) and uses the findings to inform a range of simple strategies to assist academic libraries recruit and retain talented staff.

Findings

The data appears to confirm studies conducted in the US and Canada that show Generation X and Y learning styles are typically motivated by a desire to enhance professional skills and thus marketability to future employers. For many Generation X and Y staff working across a range of professions, access to professional development has become an important component of their overall remuneration package. It also figures highly in any decision to join or remain with an organisation. This paper concludes that a better understanding of generational change and commitment to professional development are critical to the recruitment and retention efforts of future academic libraries.

Originality/value

This paper draws upon survey data not previously available for research.

Details

Library Management, vol. 28 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2017

Riccardo Bellofiore and Scott Carter

Resurgent interest in the life and work of the Italian Cambridge economist Piero Sraffa is leading to New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship. This chapter introduces readers…

Abstract

Resurgent interest in the life and work of the Italian Cambridge economist Piero Sraffa is leading to New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship. This chapter introduces readers to some of these developments. First and perhaps foremost is the fact that as of September 2016 Sraffa’s archival material has been uploaded onto the website of the Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge University, as digital colour images; this chapter introduces readers to the history of these events. This history provides sharp relief on the extant debates over the role of the archival material in leading to the final publication of Production of Commodities by Means of Commodities, and readers are provided a brief sketch of these matters. The varied nature of Sraffa scholarship is demonstrated by the different aspects of Sraffa’s intellectual legacy which are developed and discussed in the various entries of our Symposium. The conclusion is reached that we are on the cusp of an exciting phase change of tremendous potential in Sraffa scholarship.

Details

Including a Symposium on New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-539-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Nancy Wulwick

This article analyses documents before the Radcliffe Committee on the Working of the Monetary System. The proceedings of the Radcliffe Committee are recognised as…

Abstract

This article analyses documents before the Radcliffe Committee on the Working of the Monetary System. The proceedings of the Radcliffe Committee are recognised as providing a watershed in the history of monetary thought, particularly as pertains to the propositions of post‐Keynesian monetary economics. These propositions, recently detailed in two books (Rousseas, 1968; Moore, 1987), can be summarised as follows:

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Richard Sayers

The Queensland Government Libraries Consortium can claim to be one of Australia's more successful special library consortia in recent years, with a stable core membership…

Abstract

The Queensland Government Libraries Consortium can claim to be one of Australia's more successful special library consortia in recent years, with a stable core membership of 14 library services, and combined savings to the Queensland Government of over A$1M in the 2002‐2003 financial year. This paper identifies critical success factors for the consortium to date, and looks to present and future challenges at a time when no organisation can afford to take continued existence, let alone success, for granted. In 2002, consortium members began looking strategically at how their organisation should be working to future‐proof services, and expertise. This process of internal review is still very much a work in progress, and continues to pose as many questions as it answers. It has, however, focused the attention on four issues of critical concern to the consortium: corporate governance, size, scope of functions, and recognition. Solutions implemented to date may serve as useful case studies for other consortia.

Details

Library Management, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

J.L. Ford

George Lennox Sharman Shackle is now in his 82nd year having been born on 14 July 1903. Yet during the 25 years that I have known him (beginning when I was an…

Abstract

George Lennox Sharman Shackle is now in his 82nd year having been born on 14 July 1903. Yet during the 25 years that I have known him (beginning when I was an undergraduate at the University of Liverpool in 1957) he has hardly seemed to change at all, in physical appearance, in temperament, and in his attitude to his work: retirement is a word that does not enter his vocabulary. In appearance, Professor Shackle lives up to the popular image: out of any crowd, “the man in the street” would have no hesitation in identifying him as a professor. He looks the true scholar (rounded glasses and all), benign, self‐contained, appearing absent‐minded, preoccupied with higher thoughts. Since, indeed, he has altered so little over the years it is difficult to think of him as having had to pass through the “ages of man”. As he has done so, however, his temperament has also hardly changed. He is a most modest and kind person, ever willing to assist those, young and old, who seek his help with the unravelling of economic theory. As with all true scholars and researchers of distinction, Professor Shackle's byword is humility.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 12 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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