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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Richard Palmer, Mahendra Gupta and James Brandt

The purpose of this paper is to examine plastic and virtual purchasing card use by US Government agencies, with particular focus on how successful implementation might…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine plastic and virtual purchasing card use by US Government agencies, with particular focus on how successful implementation might inform governmental entities of potential improvements in the cost, quality and time associated with the digitization of their procure-to-pay processes. Specifically, the paper will: analyze the evolution of card-based payments by US Government agencies, compare the value stream of plastic and virtual cards to governmental entities, analyze the value of card use as a significant and sustainable contributor to greater governmental efficiency and examine the opportunity in the portability of successful card technology implementation strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined data published by the US federal government relating to agency budgets and commercial card use and combining it with industry performance metrics, projected potential savings and efficiencies for the government and its agencies.

Findings

The US Government acknowledges significant administrative cost savings and cash rebates based on its spending on commercial cards. An analysis of US Government spending indicates that changing patterns of card spending are primarily driven by activities of one agency – the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Through the incorporation of advances in card technology, escalation of transaction amounts and leveraging card spending data transparency, the VA has continued to increase its use of and benefit from card technology, while other agencies have languished. By replication of VA strategy, the US Government at large has the potential for billions in card-related savings.

Research limitations/implications

The study implies that a large swathe of governmental agencies, after having adopted new technology (e.g. purchasing cards), are hesitant to use the new technology, a problem that afflicts most implementation efforts. Countermeasures to offset agency resistance to change should be considered and deployed.

Practical implications

Taxpayers demand much of government. The burden of governmental failure to exploit the benefits of innovation (such as card technology) falls on the shoulders of taxpayers. When the government cannot exploit technologies that are commonly used in the private sector, the failure lowers citizen respect for the capability of government employees and the ability of government writ large to solve problems.

Social implications

Governmental failure to exploit the benefits of technology dispirits the citizenry, yielding a desire for change that may be disproportionate to the problem at hand.

Originality/value

The study combines General Services Administration, US Treasury and market data points to make a unique assessment of the benefits derived through 20 years of governmental commercial card use.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Mahendra Gupta and Richard J. Palmer

After fifteen years of use by U.S. Federal government agencies, purchase cards are still caught in a debate between the drive to improve governmental efficiency and the…

Abstract

After fifteen years of use by U.S. Federal government agencies, purchase cards are still caught in a debate between the drive to improve governmental efficiency and the need to prudently manage and control spending of taxpayer resources. This paper gives decision makers facts by which to evaluate the purchase card experience to date by providing a brief history of legislative actions related to purchase cards, analyzing patterns of purchase card spending by Federal government agencies, estimating the potential size of the purchase card program, and identifying the costs and benefits of shifting low-value transactions to the purchase card. The paper concludes with recommendations for government action.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2007

Patricia Coate

The article provides and interview with Dr Richard Pech.

Abstract

Purpose

The article provides and interview with Dr Richard Pech.

Design/methodology/approach

Richard Pech answers questions about business growth, downscoping, downsizing, core competencies, and growth strategies.

Findings

Richard Pech provides views on a variety of issues connected to business growth.

Originality/value

Provides an insightful interview with Dr Richard Pech.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Frederick G. Kilgour

An analysis of library use studies previously published by this author (Kilgour 1989) revealed that of every hundred user requests for a book, seven are not satisfied…

Abstract

An analysis of library use studies previously published by this author (Kilgour 1989) revealed that of every hundred user requests for a book, seven are not satisfied because the library has not acquired the book, eleven because there is a defect in the catalog or error in its use (3.45 to deficiency and 7.55 to user error), and twenty‐three because the book is not on the shelf. This paper demonstrates types of online catalog access that can reduce the failures caused by card catalog flaws or by user search errors by half.

Details

Online Review, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Richard Palmer

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 59 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Richard Palmer

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 59 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Richard Palmer and John P. Wilson

Seeks to examine the important role commitment plays inimplementing TQM and the interrelationship between that commitment andthe role of training. In particular, considers…

Abstract

Seeks to examine the important role commitment plays in implementing TQM and the interrelationship between that commitment and the role of training. In particular, considers the necessity of maintaining the energy and drive for quality within the system. Develops a model which is analogous to the energy within a chemical process. The existing status quo is altered through the influence of commitment to training, communications, systems, and teams. These affect the organizational culture which then reinforces further changes and developments.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Richard J. Palmer, Robert B. Welker, Terry L. Campbell and Nace R. Magner

The motive to manage impressions has been broken down into protective and acquisitive orientations. A protective orientation exists when an individual is concerned…

Abstract

The motive to manage impressions has been broken down into protective and acquisitive orientations. A protective orientation exists when an individual is concerned primarily with encountering disapproval, rather than approval, from the relevant audience. An acquisitive orientation exists when an individual is concerned primarily with obtaining approval from the audience. This study tests the proposition that organizational managers have primarily an acquisitive orientation. The affective sentiments of 95 international middle‐ and upper‐level business managers toward their organization, its leaders, and its business control mechanisms were compared with their perceptions of the acquisitiveness and protectiveness of their work environment. The results indicate that affective sentiments of managers are correlated with the acquisitiveness, but not the protectiveness, of the work environment, supporting the notion that managers have primarily an acquisitive orientation.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Bob Edinboro and Richard Palmer

Looks at the reasons and requirements for effectively planning andmanaging the implementation of TQM. Examines controlling the resultingrate of change in the organization…

Abstract

Looks at the reasons and requirements for effectively planning and managing the implementation of TQM. Examines controlling the resulting rate of change in the organization to ensure that expectations for performance improvement are achieved. Presents instructions for running an employee training session, including sample exercises.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

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