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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2019

Nnamdi Oguji, Richard Afriyie Owusu and Jorma Larimo

When entering foreign markets, multinationals can acquire part of a foreign firm and can increase or decrease their equity stake over time. However, extant studies have…

Abstract

Purpose

When entering foreign markets, multinationals can acquire part of a foreign firm and can increase or decrease their equity stake over time. However, extant studies have mainly focused on equity stake acquired during initial market entry. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study fills this gap by using the Uppsala model to analyze six cases of international acquisitions of Finnish multinationals in global markets.

Findings

The authors found that firms change their equity stake in partially acquired foreign subsidiaries: when they have learned about the host country and businesses of the partially acquired firms, when they have gained target-specific experience, when they build trust and ensure relationship commitment and finally, when they jointly develop and exploit opportunities.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to apply the Uppsala model to empirically analyze international acquisitions, thus paving the way for behavioral and process-oriented approaches. The study contributes to knowledge of post-entry strategies of multinationals.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Richard Afriyie Owusu and Terje I. Vaaland

The paper aims to identify and analyze the actors and their interrelationships in realizing local content objectives in African oil- and gas-producing nations.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify and analyze the actors and their interrelationships in realizing local content objectives in African oil- and gas-producing nations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes content analysis of relevant research papers and reports within the oil and gas industry, local content and industrial networks published between 2000 and 2014.

Findings

The study developed a framework that integrates the literature on local content with the industrial network theory. The framework classifies the various critical actors for achieving local content, proposing that achieving local content requires the development of business network links and a resource alignment among local companies and institutions and foreign companies and institutions, in addition to multinational oil companies.

Research limitations/implications

The framework of this study contributes to an emerging theory on local content by integrating the industrial network theory, which provides specific frameworks for analyzing embedded business environments, along with the previous economic and legal-based studies of local content achievement.

Practical implications

The way the relevant actors organize their resources and business networks provides potential for local content in an emerging oil and gas industry in Africa.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the few to integrate studies of local content with the industrial network theory. The literature review provides a summary window of the research on the subject over a 14-year period.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Richard A. Owusu, Maqsood Sandhu and Sören Kock

The aim of the paper is to elaborate a framework of project business as a distinct mode of internationalization. The uniqueness and complexity of project business as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to elaborate a framework of project business as a distinct mode of internationalization. The uniqueness and complexity of project business as a core mode are portrayed by comparing it with other internationalization modes. It is agreed that a single project sale is a discrete form of direct involvement in a foreign market. However, this provides opportunities for network interactions that can facilitate further project business openings in a foreign market and on a global level.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the abductive method, the paper constructs a comparative framework of project business and other forms of internationalization. It illustrates the discussion with a longitudinal case study of a company that uses project business as its strategic choice for its internationalization.

Findings

The paper finds that, using project business as its core internationalization mode, the company has expanded its global business as well as entering and succeeding in foreign business networks. It proposes that the network and relationship‐based project business approach is viable as a strategic alternative for internationalization on its own or in combination with other modes.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides a framework for positioning project business as a separate internationalization mode. It provides a comparative framework for internationalization modes.

Practical implications

This study provides managers with an understanding of project business as a distinct and profitable mode of internationalization. It illuminates the network and relationship‐building aspects of project business.

Originality/value

According to the research, this is the first study that proposes project business as a distinct mode of internationalization. Much previous research has either not mentioned project business or subsumed it as an unimportant part of exports. The framework developed in this study should spur new research on the issue.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Richard A Owusu, Crispin M Mutshinda, Imoh Antai, Kofi Q Dadzie and Evelyn M Winston

– The purpose of this paper is to identify user-generated content (UGC) features that determine web purchase decision making.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify user-generated content (UGC) features that determine web purchase decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors embed a spike-and-slab Bayesian variable selection mechanism into a logistic regression model to identify the UGC features that are critical to web purchase intent. This enables us to make a highly reliable analysis of survey data.

Findings

The results indicate that the web purchase decision is driven by the relevance, up-to-dateness and credibility of the UGC information content.

Research limitations/implications

The results show that the characteristics of UGC are seen as positive and the medium enables consumers to sort information and concentrate on aspects of the message that are similar to traditional word-of-mouth (WOM). One important implication is the relative importance of credibility which has been previously hypothesized to be lower in the electronic word-of-mouth (e-WOM) context. The results show that consumers consider credibility important as the improved technology provides more possibilities to find out about that factor. A limitation is that the data are not fully representative of the general population but our Bayesian method gives us high analytical quality.

Practical implications

The study shows that UGC impacts consumer online purchase intentions. Marketers should understand the wide range of media that provide UGC and they should concentrate on the relevance, up-to-dateness and credibility of product information that they provide.

Originality/value

The analytical quality of the spike- and- slab Bayesian method suggests a new way of understanding the impact of aspects of UGC on consumers.

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Samuel Ato Dadzie and Richard Afriyie Owusu

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the foreign direct investment (FDI) strategies of manufacturing firms in Ghana using the eclectic model in order to understand how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the foreign direct investment (FDI) strategies of manufacturing firms in Ghana using the eclectic model in order to understand how ownership, location and internalization factors impact FDI to developing countries like Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a quantitative methodology in order to statistically explore the relationships between dependent and independent variables. The data comes from a sample of 75 multinational enterprises that invested in the manufacturing sector between 1994 and 2008.

Findings

The results reveal that large firm size, extensive international experience and large market size lead to the choice of acquisition mode of entry, while high cultural distance, high country risk, high proprietary assets and incentives lead to the choice of greenfield mode in the context of Ghana.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply that the different economic, business and legal (locational) conditions of developing countries create different FDI strategies and paths of companies compared to developed markets.

Practical implications

Policy makers in developing countries should make efforts to improve market size, the institutional and regulatory environment, as well as the availability of human capital in order to attract FDI.

Originality/value

FDI studies have mainly analysed establishment mode strategies of firms in advanced markets. There is an increasing amount of research on FDI in emerging markets but very little on developing countries and African markets. Therefore, this study enables the authors to develop implications for existing theory and generate practical implications for firms and policy makers related to African and developing country markets.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Imoh Antai, Crispin Mutshinda and Richard Owusu

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a 3R (right time, right place, and right material) principle for characterizing failure in humanitarian/relief supply chains…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a 3R (right time, right place, and right material) principle for characterizing failure in humanitarian/relief supply chains’ response to natural disasters, and describes a Bayesian methodology of the failure odds with regard to external factors that may affect the disaster-relief outcome, and distinctive supply chain proneness to failure.

Design/methodology/approach

The suggested 3Rs combine simplicity and completeness, enclosing all aspects of the 7R principle popular within business logistics. A fixed effects logistic regression model is designed, with a Bayesian approach, to relate the supply chains’ odds for success in disaster-relief to potential environmental predictors, while accounting for distinctive supply chains’ proneness to failure.

Findings

Analysis of simulated data demonstrate the model’s ability to distinguish relief supply chains with regards to their disaster-relief failure odds, taking into account pertinent external factors and supply chain idiosyncrasies.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the complex nature of natural disasters and the scarcity of subsequent data, the paper employs computer-simulated data to illustrate the implementation of the proposed methodology.

Originality/value

The 3R principle offers a simple and familiar basis for evaluating failure in relief supply chains’ response to natural disasters. Also, it brings the issues of customer orientation within humanitarian relief and supply operations to the fore, which had only been implicit within the humanitarian and relief supply chain literature.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2014

Oguji Nnamdi and Richard Owusu

The purpose of this paper is to explore the scope of sourcing research in Sub-Sahara African (SSA) from scholarly journals published from 1980 to 2013 on sourcing-related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the scope of sourcing research in Sub-Sahara African (SSA) from scholarly journals published from 1980 to 2013 on sourcing-related issues. The study identifies what is known about sourcing from this region and the implications for managers and researchers in supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

Totally, 40 scholarly journals (supply chain journals and other journals publishing on diverse business topics) were found relevant and reviewed. Content (all field) search using the names of each SSA countries (e.g. Nigeria, South Africa, Ghana, etc.) was carried out in the supply chain journals to filter out articles discussing sourcing-related topics. For other business journals, keyword search was performed (procurement, sourcing, purchasing, outsourcing, supplier relations, supplier selection, supplier development, supply management, offshore, supply chain and logistics).

Findings

The literature review suggests that studies discussing sourcing issues in SSA have focussed mainly on challenges of sourcing from SSA, and they provide some insights on implementation of supply chain tools such as total quality management, negotiating and selecting suppliers from SSA, and just-in time purchasing. However, the authors found that there is an under-representation of this region in supply chain management literature. More so, the articles discussing sourcing issues in Africa are limited in scope empirically and theoretically in comparison with the large amount of contributions in other emerging economies of Asia and developed economies.

Research limitations/implications

The limited amount of publications and contributions does not allow us to provide an integrated framework for sourcing from SSA.

Practical implications

There is a need for future research to explore how the SSA context could enhance theorizing in supply chains. Also, there is need for researchers to extend the sourcing debate from the over emphasis on technology sourcing, knowledge intensive service outsourcing and component sourcing to other lower value-added products such as agricultural products and other raw materials sourced in SSA.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to explore the scope of sourcing in Africa. As the findings suggest, there have been limited amount of papers published about this region. The review provides a perspective for researchers to explore this region and to aid theory development in supply chains. It also provided implications on how to support research publication focussing on this region and how to inform managerial perceptions on sourcing from SSA.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Richard Afriyie Owusu

There is a need for new models for foreign business and investment in Africa. The world’s “poorest” continent has a massive deficit in infrastructural, production and…

Abstract

There is a need for new models for foreign business and investment in Africa. The world’s “poorest” continent has a massive deficit in infrastructural, production and other facilities. The foreign business and investment dividends expected for economic liberalization and democracy that have been implemented by most African countries since the late 1980s are yet to be fully achieved. In this paper, project business is suggested as a model for foreign firms to do business in Africa, in the short to medium term. Thereby they will establish relationships and networks and gain valuable knowledge and experience of the African economies. Such experience, relationships and networks can be used to do profitable business in the short to medium term. In the long term, economic growth in the African economies will expand opportunities, and the firms in question will be well placed to take advantage of them.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Hannele Kauppinen‐Räisänen, Richard A. Owusu and Bylon Abeeku Bamfo

The changing health care market is affecting consumers who are now expected to take greater responsibility for their health. Their means for doing this include purchasing…

Abstract

Purpose

The changing health care market is affecting consumers who are now expected to take greater responsibility for their health. Their means for doing this include purchasing self‐medication and medical self‐service, which coincides neatly with an increase in the number of over‐the‐counter (OTC) pharmaceuticals. Additionally, OTC pharmaceuticals are progressively becoming available in a wider range of stores, where the pharmacists' knowledge of the OTC products is absent. This study aims to examine packaging as media that conveys the product message at the point of purchase, and to explore the impact of its extrinsic verbal and visual product cues.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory conjoint analysis was conducted in Finland, the USA, and Ghana. In total, 89 respondents conducted conjoint tasks for two product types, i.e. a painkiller and sore throat medicine.

Findings

The results showed differences and similarities in the impact of the packaging product cues across Finland, the USA, and Ghana. Differences and similarities were also detected across the two different, but related, product types. The study found that the impact of product cues is contextual, varying across the samples and product types.

Practical implications

The results are limited by the exploratory nature of the conjoint analysis. They highlight that medical marketers should recognize the varying impact of salient cues on consumers' product preferences and choices.

Originality/value

The study deals with a mostly unexplored issue and provides exploratory insights into the phenomenon.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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