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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Richard Olley

The themes that emerged from the qualitative data of a mixed methods study that explored the effects of leadership style on the job satisfaction of aged care workers.

Abstract

Purpose

The themes that emerged from the qualitative data of a mixed methods study that explored the effects of leadership style on the job satisfaction of aged care workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a mixed methods study with the qualitative approach informing the interpretative phenomenological analysis from the transcripts of semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Three themes related to the effects of leadership style on job satisfaction of aged care employees emerged from the IPA. These themes were, The Context of Aged Care, Employee Engagement and Voice and Leader Behaviour. Job burnout and organisational disengagement were prevalent in participants of the qualitative study.

Research limitations/implications

The research deployed quantitative measurements to determine the differences between aged care leaders and their followers and used these to explore participants’ lived experiences and how they made sense of their personal and social worlds at work. In the quantitative study, there may be an overstatement of the strength of the relationship between variables among those motivated to participate in the study. The qualitative study requires the researcher to be thorough in describing the research context, and it may be that those who wish to transfer the results of this study to a different one are responsible for making the judgement on the suitability of the transferability of findings.

Practical implications

Decreasing job disengagement and burnout will positively impact reducing attrition and turnover and, thus, the availability of the aged care workforce. It will inform leadership development programs and training in aged care and other health and social care sectors.

Social implications

The workforce is a primary consideration for aged care in Australia and globally. Reducing burnout and disengagement will reduce workforce attrition, thus, improving the care for some of the most vulnerable in the population.

Originality/value

This report is from original research with ethical clearance from a university human research ethics committee contributing to the knowledge of leadership practice in aged care in Australia.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2022

Richard Olley

This paper aims to determine the effects of leadership style (LS) on organisational identification (OID) in aged care provider organisations to inform talent management…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the effects of leadership style (LS) on organisational identification (OID) in aged care provider organisations to inform talent management strategies for the sector, which has quite severe workforce shortages.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a mixed-methods study. Study 1 was quantitative in approach that measured responses to an online questionnaire containing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire and the Identification with a Psychological Group scale. The analytical strategy provided results that demonstrated the socio-demographic characteristics of the sample, the reliability and distributions of data and calculated the correlations between the factors of the deployed tools. The relationship between the factors that comprise both tools was measured, and any differences between the two natural groups were labelled leaders and raters. Study 2 was qualitative in approach, using interpretive phenomenological analysis to provide an in-depth analysis of phenomena.

Findings

The results and findings of this study are that OID was not evident in the quantitative or qualitative samples. There are recommendations for future research relating to the social capital of organisations and the use of social media to determine how these could be harnessed in support of workforce recruitment and retention strategies.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in Australia with participants from the workforces of aged care providers in three eastern states of Australia. The results and findings may be limited to the Australian aged care context. The researcher evaluated the limitations of this research relating to: Methodology: There may be an overstatement of the strength of the relationships between variables among those motivated to participate in the survey in the quantitative study; Transferability: The qualitative study required the researcher to be thorough in describing the research context, and it may be that those who wish to transfer the results of this study to a different context are responsible for making the judgement on the suitability of the transfer; Credibility: The qualitative analysis was not designed to directly reflect a relationship between each leader and their direct report raters’ experiences; and Confirmability: The researcher maintained an awareness and openness to the dynamism of the results. Frequent reflection and self-criticism about preconceptions that may have affected the research were recorded in field notes after each interview.

Practical implications

Aged care providers who must compete in the labour market for staff may use the results and findings of this research to inform recruitment and retention strategies relating to brand recognition and loyalty and social capital strategies.

Social implications

Providing an appropriate, skilled and well-led workforce will assist in providing the appropriate level of aged care service at a high standard of quality and safety that will benefit the community as a whole.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper reports on original research conducted following ethical clearance in part fulfilment of a successful conferral of a Doctor of Philosophy programme. After an extensive search of the literature, no research reports returned that examined LS and OID in the aged care service provision.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2009

Julie Beadle‐Brown, Rachel Roberts and Richard Mills

The editorial for this issue sets out the context of increasing awareness of the need for better services for children and adults with autism spectrum disorders, and…

2514

Abstract

The editorial for this issue sets out the context of increasing awareness of the need for better services for children and adults with autism spectrum disorders, and highlights the importance of policy to maintain awareness and provide incentives while recognising that more would be needed to ensure that people with autism have a good quality of life and reach their full potential. There are two sections to this paper. The first is a case study written from a parent's perspective and highlighting the need for good joint working and supporting families, as well as the importance of understanding how autism affects a child and his/her family. The second part considers good practice in supporting children and adults with autism to increase social inclusion, independence, choice and autonomy.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Creation and Analysis of Employer-Employee Matched Data
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-256-8

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term…

1877

Abstract

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term of that contract. When such a repudiation has been accepted by the innocent party then a termination of employment takes place. Such termination does not constitute dismissal (see London v. James Laidlaw & Sons Ltd (1974) IRLR 136 and Gannon v. J. C. Firth (1976) IRLR 415 EAT).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Don Revill

87

Abstract

Details

New Library World, vol. 100 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

1129

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1961

Winter meetings will be held at 5.30 for 6 p.m. on Tuesday 23rd January and Wednesday 21st February at Aslib. On 23rd January Mr Clifford Hatts, a Senior Designer in the…

Abstract

Winter meetings will be held at 5.30 for 6 p.m. on Tuesday 23rd January and Wednesday 21st February at Aslib. On 23rd January Mr Clifford Hatts, a Senior Designer in the BBC Television Design Department, will speak about his work, with special reference to transmission of information by visual means. On 21st February Mr C. W. Hanson, Head of Research Department, Aslib, will report on work in progress in information and library research, other than that being carried out by Aslib.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 13 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Saibal Ghosh

The relation between size and growth in banking firms in emerging economies has not been adequately addressed in the literature. By employing data for 1992-2014, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The relation between size and growth in banking firms in emerging economies has not been adequately addressed in the literature. By employing data for 1992-2014, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between growth and productivity and how it interacts with ownership.

Design/methodology/approach

The longitudinal nature of the data suggests that the appropriate technique for the analysis is panel data econometrics. Accordingly, consistent with prior research, the author employs a fixed effects model. Besides accounting for firm-level observables, the author controls the economic environment and bank ownership by employing real GDP growth and ownership dummies.

Findings

The evidence appears to suggest that growth improves through both active and passive learning, the magnitude of the former far outweighing that of the latter. These results are remarkably robust: both baseline regressions and sensitivity tests point to similar conclusions.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, the paper makes two original contributions. First and more broadly, it tests the relationship between growth and productivity for banks in a leading emerging economy. Second, it distinguishes between two kinds of learning – active and passive – and explores which of them are more relevant for growth.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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