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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Michel Laroche, Lefa Teng, Richard Michon and Jean‐Charles Chebat

Traditionally, researchers in environmental psychology have developed the classic C (cognition)‐ E (emotion)‐ B (behavior) paradigm. However, some researchers have failed…

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4797

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, researchers in environmental psychology have developed the classic C (cognition)‐ E (emotion)‐ B (behavior) paradigm. However, some researchers have failed to replicate this classic paradigm and suggested that cognition is an antecedent to emotions. The main goals of this research are to extend the C‐E‐B paradigm by incorporating consumers' perceptions of service quality and to determine whether the extended model of consumer shopping mall decision process is invariant across English and French Canadian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

By conducting a three‐step analysis, six hypotheses are empirically examined through a survey of 266 “real” English and French Canadian consumers in a shopping mall.

Findings

Findings indicate that consumers' evaluations of service quality in a shopping environment mediate their pleasure and purchase intention. Consumer mall shopping decision‐making process is invariant across English and French Canadian consumers.

Practical implications

For researchers who are interested in understanding consumer mall shopping behavior cross‐culturally, this research provides a model that can be tested in cross‐cultural contexts. For mall operators and store managers attempting to improve the mall environment, product quality, and offer better service, the study provides interesting solutions.

Originality/value

By incorporating service quality into consumer mall shopping decision making, this research has demonstrated that consumers' moods evoked by their perceptions of shopping mall environment and of product quality influence their purchase intentions through their perceptions of service quality. The mall shopping decision‐making process of English and French Canadian consumers is universal, regardless of their cultural orientations.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Richard Michon, Hong Yu, Donna Smith and Jean‐Charles Chebat

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the shopping mall environment impacts on hedonic and utilitarian shopping experiences, and approach behaviour of fashion…

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8577

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the shopping mall environment impacts on hedonic and utilitarian shopping experiences, and approach behaviour of fashion leaders and followers.

Design/methodology/approach

Fashion shoppers' response and behaviour has been modelled in an invariant multigroup latent structural path analysis. Paths were initially constrained and then released as required. More than 300 usable questionnaires were acquired from a mall intercept in a regional urban middleclass shopping centre. Participants were probed on their attitude about fashion, perception of the shopping mall, present mood, shopping value and approach behaviour toward the mall.

Findings

The mall environment directly influences fashion leaders' hedonic shopping experience and approach behaviour. Fashion followers' hedonic shopping experience may be mood driven, while that of fashion leaders' is triggered by higher involvement cognitive processing.

Research limitations/implications

This study was carried out in one fashion‐oriented urban mall in Montreal, and should be replicated to other locations and markets. A larger sample would allow the inclusion of additional constructs.

Practical implications

Mall owners and developers might appeal to fashion leaders through offering services that will speed up their shopping trip, using high‐tech methods to convey fashion information and by branding the mall. Fashion followers and laggards are likely to respond to experience‐oriented strategies that make their shopping trip more pleasurable.

Originality/value

Although fashion consumer groups have been studied from various perspectives, no research was found that investigates the integrated shopping experience of fashion shoppers in a shopping mall setting. This study fills the void.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Richard Michon, Hong Yu, Donna Smith and Jean‐Charles Chebat

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the shopping mall environment influences the shopping experience and approach behaviour of female fashion shoppers.

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6673

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the shopping mall environment influences the shopping experience and approach behaviour of female fashion shoppers.

Design/methodology/approach

Female shoppers were first clustered along the fashion orientation of the stores they patronise. Shoppers' response and behaviour was modelled in an invariant multigroup latent structural path analysis. Paths were initially constrained and then released as required. A total of 286 usable questionnaires were administered using a mall intercept survey method in a regional shopping centre. Participants were probed on their shopping activities, shopping mall perception, product perception, shopping value and approach behaviour toward the mall.

Findings

A favourable perception of the mall atmosphere elicits a positive perception of the merchandise offering and triggers hedonic shopping experiences. The effect of the mall environment, mediated by product perception, significantly impacts the shopping objectives of middle‐of‐the‐road female fashion shoppers. Mall atmospherics has no or little effect on the utilitarian value of low‐ or high‐fashion oriented shoppers. Hedonic response of fashion forward shoppers is not stronger than that of other fashion shoppers.

Research limitations/implications

This study was carried out in one regional mall and should be replicated to other locations and markets. A larger sample would allow the inclusion of additional constructs.

Practical implications

Mall developers and operators are not only in real estate; they are also retailers. The mall environment is central to the perception of merchandise quality, and the shopping experience. Mall operators must be aware that the middle market target group is one that is highly sought after. They should strive to create a tenant mix that satisfies the many layers of fashion shopper needs.

Originality/value

This study represents a first attempt that investigates the integrated shopping experience of fashion shoppers in a shopping mall setting. It segments shoppers on their actual shopping behaviour rather than psychometrics.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Richard Michon, Jean-Charles Chebat, Hong Yu and Linda Lemarié

The purpose of this paper is to explore female fashion shoppers’ perception and response to the mall environment. Specific objectives include a conceptual model of female…

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5332

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore female fashion shoppers’ perception and response to the mall environment. Specific objectives include a conceptual model of female fashion shoppers’ experience in a mall environment incorporating fashion orientation, store personality, shopping mall perception, shopping value, and patronage intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical testing is done with a latent path structural equation model. Data collection was carried out in a firmly controlled mall intercept survey which produced 312 usable questionnaires.

Findings

Results show that shoppers’ fashion orientation hypothesized to be a personality trait is not an antecedent to the perception of the mall environment. Instead, fashion orientation moderates the perception of product and service quality, hedonic shoppers’ response, and patronage intentions. The perceived mall personality has a focussed impact on the perception of product and service quality. The mall’s sophistication image influences the perception of product quality. On the other hand, the mall’s enthusiasm image atmosphere affects the perception of service quality. Perceptions of product and service quality are correlated and trigger positive hedonic and utilitarian shopping benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Because findings from this study cannot be generalized to other situations, the research should be replicated to a variety of mall formats and shopper segments. Furthermore, other fashion-orientation factors (fashion leadership, fashion interest, and anti-fashion attitude) should be considered. However, along with model complexities, increased sample sizes are also required. Future studies may also include male shoppers to investigate differences in fashion motivation and mall shopping experience.

Practical implications

It is concluded that the person-place congruency theory is confirmed and that the shoppers’ fashion orientation should be included in the set of segmentation variables. Shopping malls cannot be everything to everyone without risking diluting their image. Downtown urban malls have the opportunity to adopt a well-defined positioning in order to differentiate themselves. Large suburban malls should partition themselves to remove image ambiguities. Mall managers must primarily work on the “meaning” of the mall atmosphere rather “mood.” Fashion shoppers are task oriented. Mall managers should design malls to facilitate the shopping experience with highly functional designs, simple layout, and clear signage in support of wayfinding.

Originality/value

Although fashion consumers have been studied from diverse perspectives, there is limited research on the experience of fashion shoppers in a mall setting. This study partly fills this gap in the literature by investigating how female fashion shoppers respond to the shopping center environment and commit to mall patronage.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Jiyoung Kim and Sharron J. Lennon

This research extends Mehrabian and Russell's Stimulus‐Organism‐Response model to include both external (i.e. reputation) and internal source of information (i.e. website…

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14572

Abstract

Purpose

This research extends Mehrabian and Russell's Stimulus‐Organism‐Response model to include both external (i.e. reputation) and internal source of information (i.e. website quality) as stimuli which affect consumers' response systems. The purpose of this paper is to test a more comprehensive model consisting of reputation and website quality (stimuli), cognition and emotion (organism) and purchase intention (response).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 219 usable questionnaires were obtained at a large Midwestern university through online survey. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed for data analyses.

Findings

Reputation had a significant positive effect on consumers' emotion and significant negative effect on perceived risk. All four website quality dimensions had significant negative effects on perceived risk and significant positive effects on emotion, except for customer service. Perceived risk had a significant negative effect on consumers' emotion, and both perceived risk and emotion had a significant impact on purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This research employed convenience sampling, which resulted in a majority of female respondents. The results may be generalized to a limited extent.

Originality/value

This study allows for empirical examination of the different effects of various components of retail websites on emotion, perceived risk and behavioral intentions. This research will add value to the related literature by filling the void of previous research and also will provide practical implications for online retailers on designing and maintaining positive consumer response. Strength of the research lies in its ecological validity, since respondents were not simply all reacting to the same single stimulus.

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Dieter Pfister

This chapter proposes a place atmosphere model, which can be used for all types of space, from the landscape to the municipality to the property. In addition to the…

Abstract

This chapter proposes a place atmosphere model, which can be used for all types of space, from the landscape to the municipality to the property. In addition to the emotional aspects, this atmosphere model also describes the socio-cultural, economic and ecologic dimensions that can shape an atmosphere. It is modelled in such a way to permit connecting to the theory and practice of brand and destination management in particular and to the model and process ideas of the planning, design and construction industries.

Details

Atmospheric Turn in Culture and Tourism: Place, Design and Process Impacts on Customer Behaviour, Marketing and Branding
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-070-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Dwight R. Merunka and Robert A. Peterson

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

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630

Abstract

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Dr Charles Dennis and Dr Tamira King

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561

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Tina Poon and Bianca Grohmann

This replication and extension of Hirsch and Gruss examines the impact of spatial density and ambient scent on consumers' spatial perception and anxiety. The paper aims to…

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1018

Abstract

Purpose

This replication and extension of Hirsch and Gruss examines the impact of spatial density and ambient scent on consumers' spatial perception and anxiety. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (spatial density: high, low)×3 (ambient scent: no scent, scent associated with spaciousness, scent associated with enclosed spaces) between-participants experimental design was implemented in a laboratory setting. A pretest determined scent selection and manipulation checks were successful.

Findings

Spatial perception was influenced by spatial density, but not ambient scent. Ambient scent and spatial density interacted, such that consumers' anxiety levels significantly increased under conditions of low spatial density combined with an ambient scent associated with spaciousness, and directionally increased under conditions of high spatial density combined with ambient scent associated with enclosed space.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in a laboratory setting in order to increase experimental control. An exploration of the strength of the observed effects in a field (retail) setting would be insightful.

Practical implications

Results of this study suggest that retailers need to consider both spatial density and choice of ambient scent carefully in order to reduce consumers' anxiety levels.

Originality/value

This research is one of the few to consider the impact of spatial density and ambient scent on consumers' anxiety levels. The use of a between-participants design and the experimental manipulation of both spatial density and ambient scent results in a more rigorous test of the scent – anxiety relation observed in previous research.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

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