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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Jane Whitney Gibson, Richard M. Hodgetts and Jorge M. Herrera

This paper discusses the lives and contributions of five key members of the Management History Division: Arthur G. Bedeian; Alfred A. Bolton; James C. Worthy (now…

Abstract

This paper discusses the lives and contributions of five key members of the Management History Division: Arthur G. Bedeian; Alfred A. Bolton; James C. Worthy (now deceased); Charles D. Wrege; and Daniel A. Wren. Each has proved himself a teacher and intellectual leader in matters of fundamental concern to management history.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Steven B. Moser and Mary L. Nicholson

While most nonprofit organisations provide guidelines to be followed by their governing bodies in terms of responsibilities and duties, implementation of these guidelines…

Abstract

While most nonprofit organisations provide guidelines to be followed by their governing bodies in terms of responsibilities and duties, implementation of these guidelines is often problematic (Harris, 1989; Herman & Heimovics, 1991). The board of trustees of the non‐profit organisation has one responsibility: to keep the organisation on a straight course for the long term good of the whole; that is, to see that the organisation fulfils its mission (Zander, 1993). But evidence suggests that this description is more straightforward than actual practice would suggest.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Jane Whitney Gibson, Richard M. Hodgetts and Charles W. Blackwell

This paper reports the results of a Management History Division survey within the Academy of Management which investigated the current status and future direction of…

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a Management History Division survey within the Academy of Management which investigated the current status and future direction of management history teaching in the management curriculum and the role and direction of the Management History Division in general. Comparisons were made to a similar 1989 survey. While management history as a separate course remains elusive, management history continues to be taught in other mainstream management courses. The role of the Management History Division is seen as critical in encouraging others to teach management history. Significant accomplishments have been made in this area since the earlier survey including an expanded Executive Committee, a revised newsletter, new awards for service in the field, and the initiation of the Journal of Management History as an outlet for publication in the field.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

A.N.M. Waheeduzzaman and John K. Ryans

Competitiveness is one of the most misunderstood concepts of the 1990s. It has drawn substantial attention from the government and business communities during the last 25…

Abstract

Competitiveness is one of the most misunderstood concepts of the 1990s. It has drawn substantial attention from the government and business communities during the last 25 years. Morrisson et al. (1988) noted that between 1983 and 1987, the term competitiveness appeared more than 5700 times in the titles of newspapers and magazine articles. The growth of importance and interest can also be observed from the increase in the bibliographical entries in ABI/Inform database. From 1981 to 1986, the topic “international competitiveness” increased by about 26 listings per year (a total of 159 in 6 years) and the rate increased to 45 listings per year from 1987 to 1993. Academic interest in the area has also increased and as a result, new developments contemplating conceptualization and understanding of competitiveness are taking place. However, to no one's surprise, writers from different disciplines offer a variation in perspective when describing the concept, understanding, and postulation of competitiveness.

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Judith Scott, Debora Gilliard and Richard Scott

Since 1977, U.S. firms have been prohibited from bribing foreign officials under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. As a result, many traditional competitors of U.S…

Abstract

Since 1977, U.S. firms have been prohibited from bribing foreign officials under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. As a result, many traditional competitors of U.S. multinational firms have been willing to pay bribes to foreign officials as a marketing ploy to win sales at the expense of their American counterparts. Because bribery of public officials is widespread in many developing nations to facilitate overseas sales, U.S. firms lost significant overseas contracts while their foreign competitors gained market share. Recognizing the dilemma that American firms are in, successive U.S. administrations have led the charge against bribery and have attempted to get other nations to join in the battle. Now, after twenty years, these attempts are finally paying off. A growing number of international organizations have developed guidelines to help curb corruption in the future. This paper traces the U.S.'s attempts to curtail official bribery, and details new information outlets and laws passed by other nations to be used as weapons as they join in the U.S.‐led fight against bribery.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Alberto Krygier

Discusses the key differences in business approach to TQM withinthe three major global economies of the Asia Pacific, Europe and NorthAmerica. Suggests that TQM can act as…

Abstract

Discusses the key differences in business approach to TQM within the three major global economies of the Asia Pacific, Europe and North America. Suggests that TQM can act as a catalyst in the emerging economies of Eastern Europe through their reliance on teamwork and employee empowerment. Identifies the main principles of management training common to most TQM models. Goes on to point out the quality review policy within the author′s own company, which is geared to enhancing the standard and consistency of customer service by continually responding to the customer′s needs. Believes that worldwide implementation of these standards would help organizations in exceeding the expectation of customers.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Abstract

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Kirk C. Heriot and Noel D. Campbell

Entrepreneurship has been widely recognized as having greatly influenced the United States. Its influence has especially been documented over the past 20 years…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship has been widely recognized as having greatly influenced the United States. Its influence has especially been documented over the past 20 years. Paralleling our societal interest in entrepreneurship has been increasing interest in entrepreneurship education. While our interest in entrepreneurship education has grown considerably over the past two decades, this field of study continues to have critics both within and outside of schools and colleges of business (Kuratko 2004). In spite of these criticisms, some researchers suggest that the United States is still far ahead of other regions of the world in terms of entrepreneurial education (Solomon et al. 1998).

Using entrepreneurship education in the United States as a point of departure, this article uses a case study to analyze the efforts of a private university in Bogota, Colombia, to create a new program in entrepreneurship. The Colombian Legislature passed Law 590 in July 2000 as a means to promote and develop entrepreneurship in the nation. Shortly thereafter a private university in Bogota started a new program in entrepreneurship. At the university's invitation, a small number of faculty from U.S. universities participated in the school's “kick-off” efforts. The paper offers analysis and recommendations based on five criteria: 1) What is taught, 2) Why it is taught, 3) How it is taught, 4) How well it works, and 5) Leadership support. In addition, rather than simply adopting a U.S. or European model of entrepreneurship education, the authors propose that they should develop a center that integrates lessons from other models with elements that are relevant to the local situation.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Karl Moore

– The purpose of this paper is to interview a senior scholar to get his/her perspectives on the field, it’s history and future.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to interview a senior scholar to get his/her perspectives on the field, it’s history and future.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi-structured in-depth interview was conducted.

Research limitations/implications

It is one person’s personal views, albeit, a person with very considerable success in the field of business studies.

Social implications

The interview reflects the changes in business schools over the interviewee’s decades of experience.

Originality/value

The person being interviewed is a unique individual.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Herbert Sherman and Daniel J. Rowley

Stephen Hodgetts read the e-mail over and over again and still could hardly believe what he had read. He had just come back from his vacation, well rested and refreshed…

Abstract

Stephen Hodgetts read the e-mail over and over again and still could hardly believe what he had read. He had just come back from his vacation, well rested and refreshed, and this e-mail had dampened his high enthusiasm. It took time to absorb such bad news and for Hodgetts to get over his incredulity.Yet in the end Hodgetts accepted the truth‐a deep, dark terrible truth that would not go away. Robert Davis, his business partner’s son, had confirmed in an e-mail his worst fears about their newest business partner, David Russ.Many thoughts were running through his mind simultaneously yet each screamed to be heard.“How could he and his partner Richard Davis have been so blind, so trusting?” “How could Russ not have heeded the advice of his business partner, Richard Davis, Russ’s former English professor?” And most important, “What was now going to happen to their new business?” Yet the one thought that continued to echo among them all was surprisingly a quote from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s beloved character, Sherlock Holmes: “But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world without them.”

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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