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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

David A.T. Southgate and Richard M. Faulks

Evaluating the hypothesis that dietary fibre is a protective factor and interpretation of the nutritional advice to ‘eat more fibre’ is dependent on quantitative measurements of…

Abstract

Evaluating the hypothesis that dietary fibre is a protective factor and interpretation of the nutritional advice to ‘eat more fibre’ is dependent on quantitative measurements of dietary fibre. The analysis poses several very difficult analytical issues. Firstly there are the technical issues which arise whenever one analyses a complex mixture, especially of carbohydrates. Secondly, because different components exert different physiological effects, there is a need to characterise as well as quantify the dietary fibre if one wishes to understand or predict its effects; and thirdly, the definition of dietary fibre is couched in physiological terms that do not lend themselves to translation into analytical procedures.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 89 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Paul Finglas and Richard Faulks

During the last 30 years there have been many and dramatic changes to the pattern of potato production and distribution in the UK. Varieties and cultural techniques have changed…

Abstract

During the last 30 years there have been many and dramatic changes to the pattern of potato production and distribution in the UK. Varieties and cultural techniques have changed and so, too, have post‐harvest handling, storage, marketing and distribution. Any or all of these might have had an effect on the nutritional value of the potato but whether this was so was not known until a two‐year nutritional evaluation of retail potatoes in the UK was recently completed. This work was financed by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and carried out by Paul Finglas and Richard Faulks at the Food Research Institute, Norwich.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 85 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

M.R. Denning, Edmund Davies and L.J. Lawton

June 22,1972 Damages — Remoteness — Negligence — Economic loss — Contractors damaging cable supplying electricity to factory — Physical damage to metal in factory's furnace as…

Abstract

June 22,1972 Damages — Remoteness — Negligence — Economic loss — Contractors damaging cable supplying electricity to factory — Physical damage to metal in factory's furnace as result of power cut — Loss of profit from “melt” and from further melts which would have taken place if no power cut — Whether economic loss recoverable — Whether economic loss attaching to physical loss recoverable — Doctrine of parasitic damages.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Richard Faulks and Sue Southon

Notes that of 600 carotenoids found in nature, only 40 are regularly consumed by humans. Looks at the biological functions of carotenoids. Reports on studies with regard to the…

402

Abstract

Notes that of 600 carotenoids found in nature, only 40 are regularly consumed by humans. Looks at the biological functions of carotenoids. Reports on studies with regard to the effects on health carotenoid‐rich diets.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 97 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Philip Miles

Abstract

Details

Midlife Creativity and Identity: Life into Art
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-333-1

Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2005

Richard Iles

Abstract

Details

Public Transport in Developing Countries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045681-2

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Richard W. Schwester

The touted benefits of inter-governmental contracting are cost savings and simplicity when compared to shared service agreements. Some managers and public officials resist…

Abstract

The touted benefits of inter-governmental contracting are cost savings and simplicity when compared to shared service agreements. Some managers and public officials resist contracting given the assumption that there may be a drop-off in service quality. However, inter-governmental contracting introduces market forces which theoretically would improve performance while keeping costs per unit of output low (Boyne, 1998). This paperexamines municipal police contracting in the State of New Jersey, the purpose of which is to determine if there are statistically significant differences in non-violent crime rates among municipalities that maintain their own police force versus those that contract with neighboring municipalities for police services. Contracting costs are also explored. While summary statistics indicate lower non-violent crime rates among municipalities that maintain their own police force compared to those that contract for police services, multiple regression results indicate that contracting does not predict higher non-violent crime rates at the .05 level. Therefore, contracting for police services should be explored as an alternative municipal policing model.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Stephen Brown

Felicitous writing is enormously important. However, the art of writing well is rarely addressed by marketing scholars. This paper seeks to argue that the marketing academy has…

Abstract

Purpose

Felicitous writing is enormously important. However, the art of writing well is rarely addressed by marketing scholars. This paper seeks to argue that the marketing academy has much to learn from historiography, a sub‐discipline devoted to the explication of historical writing.

Design/methodology/approach

Although it is primarily predicated on published works, this paper is not a conventional literature review. It relies, rather, on the classic historical method of “compare and contrast”. It considers parallels between the paired disciplines yet notes where marketing and history diverge in relation to literary styles and scientific aspirations.

Findings

It is concluded that marketing writing could benefit from greater emphasis on “character” and “storytelling”. These might help humanise a mode of academic communication that is becoming increasingly abstruse and ever‐more unappealing to its readership.

Research implications

If its argument is accepted by the academic community – and, more importantly, acted upon – this paper should transform the writing of marketing. Although the academic reward systems and power structures of marketing make revolutionary change unlikely, a “scholarly spring” is not inconceivable.

Originality/value

The paper's originality rests in the observation that originality is unnecessary. All of the literary‐cum‐stylistic issues raised in this paper have already been tackled by professional historians. Whether marketers are willing to learn from their historical brethren remains to be seen.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Nick Johns

NACNE and COMA have recommended, on health grounds, that the British population's fat intake be reduced to below 35% of total dietary energy. The most recent estimate puts…

Abstract

NACNE and COMA have recommended, on health grounds, that the British population's fat intake be reduced to below 35% of total dietary energy. The most recent estimate puts national domestic fat consumption at 43% of total dietary energy, but there is no such data for the dietary fat contribution of foods eaten outside the home.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 87 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Zakhar Berkovich and Elizabeth A.M. Searing

The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first is to map the most influential literature in nonprofit finance and financial management. The second is to understand why the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first is to map the most influential literature in nonprofit finance and financial management. The second is to understand why the literature has evolved the way it has, including isolated silos developing in certain disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

The review includes articles assembled from three sources: a core list, an expert list and journal archive searches on phrases that emerged. Using social origins theory as a guide, we coded 119 articles for traits such as root discipline, methodology and author characteristics.

Findings

Research tends to stay confined within the doctoral discipline of the author, who publishes in journals valued by their discipline. This has caused limited cross-referencing across disciplines, and it has allowed different understandings and judgments of the same phenomenon to exist in different fields. Data availability drives much of the research agenda, but author teams of mixed disciplines are promising.

Originality/value

Unlike a traditional literature review, this study identifies factors that have had a formative influence on the development of the diverse field of nonprofit finance and financial management. This diversity has resulted in a fractured field held in silos with few indigenous developments. Using social origins theory as a guide, this study provides an overview of the most consequential literature through the analysis of authors and institutional characteristics. This approach provides an evolutionary perspective and illustrates how this disciplinary adherence has created a research topography that limits progress for both scholars and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

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