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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Matthew Warren and Richard Lucas

This paper aims to introduce a special section based on papers from Australasian Conference for Information Systems 2014.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce a special section based on papers from Australasian Conference for Information Systems 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper comments on key contextualisation moments in relevant history.

Findings

This paper describes the initiative in Australia to widen Information and Communication Technology ethics awareness.

Originality/value

This is a new attempt to bring Ethics and Information Systems academics closer together.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Danica Ognjenovic

Wood Green “Shopping City” is hardly the most attractive development Europe has ever seen — the heavy, red‐brick, municipal feel of the place doesn't merit the warm and…

Abstract

Wood Green “Shopping City” is hardly the most attractive development Europe has ever seen — the heavy, red‐brick, municipal feel of the place doesn't merit the warm and exciting catch‐phrases which the publicists have dreamed up for it. However, as an integrated urban development it figured prominently in the International Council of Shopping Centres' 5th Annual European Conference, where it was used as a case study for a panel session. As far as general information goes, there are still 14 units on the market, and standard shops are letting for between £20,000‐£30,000 in Phase II. The centre is mainly for comparison shopping, although there is a bid to increase food representation in certain areas, and there are restaurant facilities within the development itself. Wood Green was designed to be a major focus for shopping in North London and to cater for a projected catchment area of some 3–4 million people. The last attendance figures available for the “Shopping City” (which were taken in late April when a number of shops now open were not trading) show Saturday to be the peak day, when a total of 50,000 people used the centre. Phase I was started in 1973, and sits on the east side of Wood Green high road. Phase II, on the west side, began construction in 1976, and the major stores of D H Evans and C&A are trading now. Phases I and II are linked by a bridge across the high street at first floor level. Called the Gallery, units on this bridge will be leased to specialist up‐market shops, and this area is singled out for high pedestrian flow. What distinguishes Wood Green is the major housing development on the upper levels of Shopping City. This is due for completion in 1981 and will provide 201 flats for over 500 people. The dwellings are for one, two or five persons, and overlook a central landscaped court, inside which is a children's creche. In February 1979 a Market Hall was opened which gives 54,000 sq ft to 72 traders, many of whom have installed themselves there now that their old sites have been replaced by Shopping City. Another feature which has been made much of by the developers is Citysquare, “a place where shoppers and advertisers will meet.” A metal frame has been suspended from the ceiling of Citysquare and it is planned to take in “advertising, news and entertainment facilities with dramatic sound and vision.” Below this structure, it is hoped that national and local advertisers will put on show their products and services. It must also be noted that there is provision for 1,500 car parking spaces, and 25,000 sq ft of offices. It is also felt that because the car park is located directly over the shopping centre, it encourages pedestrian flow through the first floor level of the development. The other way in which customer circulation is encouraged is via the Gallery across the high road and because there are main traders at each end, on both floors. The development is a joint enterprise between the Haringey Council and Electricity Supply Nominees Ltd, builders are John Laing Ltd, architects are Sheppard Robson, and Development Consultants, Letting and managing agents are Richard Ellis, London. The following report outlines major areas of interest discussed at the conference. The panel speakers were: Richard Young of Sheppard Robson, London, who were the architects for Wood Green; Nigel Woolner of Chapman Taylor Associates, who have Eldon Square in their portfolio and who are involved in the West One development in Oxford Street; Rex Mercer of Drivers Jonas, which acted on behalf of the London Borough of Haringey for the Wood Green development; and Derek Nunn of Bungey, Nunn & Stock, marketing advisers, who also contributed to Wood Green. Roger Lucas of Richard Ellis chaired the panel.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Abstract

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Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Richard Lucas and Nyree Mason

The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary analysis of age and gender across a number of questions asked in a survey of ethical attitudes of professionals in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary analysis of age and gender across a number of questions asked in a survey of ethical attitudes of professionals in the information and communication technology (ICT) industry in Australia. While a large number of demographic questions regarding ethics and regulation, only those concerning age and gender are examined here.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted of the ICT workplace in Australia. The results were analyzed using SPSS.

Findings

There are some significant differences across the generations as well between the genders. Gen Y is different when compared to the others on how important ethical regulations ought to be. Gen Y thinks that ethical regulations ought to be less important. When gender was examined it was clear that males thought that ethical regulations ought to be significantly less important when compared with what females thought.

Research limitations/implications

While a larger sample size was desired, the consistency of the replies, when compared against a number of comparative populations, indicated that the replies we received were representative of the ICT workforce.

Originality/value

This paper raises many issues that demand greater care and attention be given when constructing new models of governing ethics within the Australian ICT workplace.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

I would like to ask a question first to Mr Ian Day and later on to the gentlemen representing the project KAREN‐PEWEX.

Abstract

I would like to ask a question first to Mr Ian Day and later on to the gentlemen representing the project KAREN‐PEWEX.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Beth Kreydatus

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of a significant group of retail employees, specifically the African‐American operations and service workers that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of a significant group of retail employees, specifically the African‐American operations and service workers that worked behind the scenes in department stores during the Jim Crow era, defined here as 1890‐1965.

Design/methodology/approach

Department stores have rightly occupied a prominent place in business historiography. This wealth of scholarship can be explained partly by substantial archival resources, but especially by department stores' significance to US business, cultural, and social history. Yet, despite this rich historiography, a significant number of department store employees have been overlooked, and this omission has distorted the picture of the work culture and marketing strategies of these massive and influential retail institutions. Department stores employ a large number of operations and service staff, such as delivery people, housekeeping and maintenance workers, elevator operators, stock workers, packers, and warehouse workers. These positions make up roughly one‐fifth of all department store work. This paper presents a close study of the two most prominent department stores of early and mid‐twentieth century Richmond, Virginia – Thalhimers and Miller & Rhoads – to offer insight into the work culture and workplace experiences of these employees.

Findings

Ultimately, this paper shows that African‐American employees played an important role in the maintenance and image of Richmond department stores. Store managers place high demands for “loyalty” and “faithfulness” on their black staff to demonstrate their lavish services to the buying public. For black employees, this means that the work environment can be highly stressful, as they seek to meet competing demands from customers and co‐workers. However, department store work offers opportunities, in particular, steady employment among a close network of African‐American coworkers. Finally, the presence of segregated black employees undermines managements' attempts to convey their workforce as one “happy family.”

Research limitations/implications

The research is entirely based on two high‐end department stores, Miller & Rhoads and Thalhimers, both based in Richmond, Virginia. Two store archives – available at the Valentine Richmond History Center and the Virginia Historical Society – are the primary resources for this project. Because, the papers in these archives are donated by store managers, a limitation to this study is the dearth of unmediated voices of the employees themselves.

Originality/value

This research adds to the historiography of department stores by shedding light on employees who are expected by employers to remain nearly invisible in their jobs, and unfortunately, have been fairly invisible in the historical record as well.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2016

Roman Liesenfeld, Jean-François Richard and Jan Vogler

We propose a generic algorithm for numerically accurate likelihood evaluation of a broad class of spatial models characterized by a high-dimensional latent Gaussian…

Abstract

We propose a generic algorithm for numerically accurate likelihood evaluation of a broad class of spatial models characterized by a high-dimensional latent Gaussian process and non-Gaussian response variables. The class of models under consideration includes specifications for discrete choices, event counts and limited-dependent variables (truncation, censoring, and sample selection) among others. Our algorithm relies upon a novel implementation of efficient importance sampling (EIS) specifically designed to exploit typical sparsity of high-dimensional spatial precision (or covariance) matrices. It is numerically very accurate and computationally feasible even for very high-dimensional latent processes. Thus, maximum likelihood (ML) estimation of high-dimensional non-Gaussian spatial models, hitherto considered to be computationally prohibitive, becomes feasible. We illustrate our approach with ML estimation of a spatial probit for US presidential voting decisions and spatial count data models (Poisson and Negbin) for firm location choices.

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Spatial Econometrics: Qualitative and Limited Dependent Variables
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-986-2

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2017

Tamar Diana Wilson

To summarize the shocks and stresses that peasants in Mexico have been subjected to since the 1940s and to examine the responses of sons of peasants working as…

Abstract

Purpose

To summarize the shocks and stresses that peasants in Mexico have been subjected to since the 1940s and to examine the responses of sons of peasants working as semi-informal beach vendors in Cabo San Lucas as to what they define as the worst problems of the peasantry in their hometowns.

Methodology/approach

This chapter offers an analysis of the responses of 32 sons of peasants interviewed on Medano Beach in Cabo San Lucas in October of 2012 partially as concerns whether they would like to be peasants themselves and as to what they define as the worst problems of the peasantry in their hometowns.

Findings

Twenty-five of the thirty-two vendors interviewed would be happy to be peasants. According to all of the vendors, the overwhelming problems facing the peasantry were primarily droughts or floods (related to climate change) and lack of government aid (related to neoliberalization).

Social implications

The peasantry in Mexico is being and has been marginalized both by a number of stresses and shocks, currently identified by some of those at risk as factors related to climate change and neoliberalization.

Details

Anthropological Considerations of Production, Exchange, Vending and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-194-2

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Alexandre Rambaud and Jacques Richard

This chapter gives in “Introduction to the Human Capital Issue” a critical analysis of the standard (economic) Human Capital (HC) theory, with the help of some…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter gives in “Introduction to the Human Capital Issue” a critical analysis of the standard (economic) Human Capital (HC) theory, with the help of some “traditional” (founding) accounting concepts. From this study, to avoid the accounting and social issues highlighted in “Introduction to the Human Capital Issue,” we present, in “The “Triple Depreciation Line” Model and the Human Capital,” the “Triple Depreciation Line” (TDL) accounting model, developed by Rambaud & Richard (2015b), and we apply it to “HC,” but viewed as genuine accounting capital – a matter of concern – that firms have to protect and maintain.

Methodology/approach

From a critical review of literature on HC theory, from the origin of this concept to its connection with sustainable development, this chapter provides a conceptual discussion on this notion and on the differences/common points between capital and assets in accounting and economics. Then, it uses a normative accounting model (TDL), initially introduced to extend, in a consistent way, financial accounting to extra-financial issues.

Findings

This analysis shows at first that the standard (economic) HC theory is based on a (deliberate) confusion between assets and capital, in line with a standard economic perspective on capital. Therefore, this particular viewpoint implies: an accounting issue for reporting HC, because “traditional” accounting capital and assets are clearly isolated concepts; and a societal issue, because this confusion leads to the idea that HC does not mean that human beings are “capital” (i.e., essential), or have to be maintained, even protected, for themselves. It only means that human beings are mere productive means. The application of the TDL model to an accounting redefinition of HC allows a discussion about some key issues involved in the notion of HC, including the difference between the standard and “accounting” narratives on HC. Finally, this chapter presents some important consequences of this accounting model for HC: the disappearance of the concept of wage and the possibility of reporting repeated (or continuous) use of HC directly in the balance sheet.

Research implications

This chapter contributes to the literature on HC and in general on capital and assets, by stressing in particular some confusions and misunderstandings in these concepts. It fosters a cross-disciplinary approach of these issues, through economic, accounting, and sustainability viewpoints. This analysis also participates in the development of the TDL model and the research project associated. It finally proposes another perspective, more sustainable, on HC and HC reporting.

Social implications

The stakes of HC are important in today’s economics, accounting, and sustainable development. The different conceptualizations of HC, and the narratives behind it, may have deep social and corporate implications. In this context, this analysis provides a conceptual, and practicable, framework to develop a more sustainable concept of HC and to enhance working conditions, internal business relations, integrated reporting. As an outcome of these ideas, this chapter also questions the standard corporate governance models.

Originality/value

This chapter gives an original perspective on HC, and in general on the concept of capital, combining an economic and an accounting analysis. It also develops a new way to report HC, using an innovative integrated accounting model, the TDL model.

Details

Finance and Economy for Society: Integrating Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-509-6

Keywords

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