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Records Management Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Richard Nolan

Fraud, so it seems, never goes out of fashion. The United Bank of Kuwait plc advanced monies to Mr Sahib, and when the monies were not duly repaid, the Bank took…

Abstract

Fraud, so it seems, never goes out of fashion. The United Bank of Kuwait plc advanced monies to Mr Sahib, and when the monies were not duly repaid, the Bank took proceedings to recover the debt due to it; it obtained judgment against Mr Sahib, and sought to enforce that judgment by obtaining a charging order over Mr Sahib's beneficial interests in two freehold properties in Hampstead. The beneficial interests existed behind statutory trusts for sale, and the trustees for sale of both properties were Mr Sahib and his wife, Mrs Hashim. In due course, charging orders were obtained and then made absolute. At this point, there arose a dispute between the United Bank of Kuwait and the Société Générate Alsacienne de Banque SA (‘Sogenal’). Sogenal claimed that it held an equitable mortgage over the interests which were the subject of the charging order, that its mortgages were created before the charging orders obtained by the United Bank of Kuwait, and that its mortgages consequently ranked in priority to the Bank's charging orders. This dispute as to priorities formed the subject of Chadwick J's decision in United Bank of Kuwait plc v Sahib.

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Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Katherine M. Johnson, Richard M. Simon, Jessica L. Liddell and Sarah Kington

There has been substantial interest in US cesarean rates, which increased from 5% of deliveries in the 1970s to nearly one-third of births by the mid-2000s. Explanations…

Abstract

There has been substantial interest in US cesarean rates, which increased from 5% of deliveries in the 1970s to nearly one-third of births by the mid-2000s. Explanations typically emphasize individual risk factors (e.g., advanced maternal age, increased BMI, and greater desire for control over delivery) of women giving birth, or address institutional factors, such as the medicalization of childbirth and the culture of liability leading physicians to practice defensive medicine. We focus here on another non-medical explanation – childbirth education (CBE). CBE is an important, underexplored mechanism that can shape women’s expectations about labor and birth and potentially lead them to expect, or desire, a cesarean delivery as a normalized outcome. We analyze data from three waves (2002, 2006, 2013) of the Listening to Mothers national survey on US women’s childbearing experiences (n = 3,985). Using logistic regression analysis, we examined both mode of delivery (vaginal versus cesarean), and attitudes about future request for elective cesarean among both primiparous and multiparous women. Despite previous research suggesting that CBE increased the likelihood of vaginal delivery, we find that CBE attendance was not associated with likelihood of vaginal delivery among either primiparous or multiparous women. However, both primiparous and multiparous women who attended CBE classes were significantly more likely to say they would request a future, elective cesarean. Furthermore, these effects were in the opposite direction of effects for natural birth attitudes. Our findings suggest that contemporary CBE classes may be a form of “anticipatory socialization”, potentially priming women’s acceptance of medicalized childbirth.

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2021

Sam Bailey

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The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2017

Kevin J. Boudreau

Rather than organize as traditional firms, many of today’s companies organize as platforms that sit at the nexus of multiple exchange and production relationships. This…

Abstract

Rather than organize as traditional firms, many of today’s companies organize as platforms that sit at the nexus of multiple exchange and production relationships. This chapter considers a most basic question of organization in platform contexts: the choice of boundaries. Herein, I investigate how classical economic theories of firm boundaries apply to platform-based organization and empirically study how executives made boundary choices in response to changing market and technical challenges in the early mobile computing industry (the predecessor to today’s smartphones). Rather than a strict or unavoidable tradeoff between “openness-versus-control,” most successful platform owners chose their boundaries in a way to simultaneously open-up to outside developers while maintaining coordination across the entire system.

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Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Platforms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-080-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2019

Russell Mannion, Huw Davies, Martin Powell, John Blenkinsopp, Ross Millar, Jean McHale and Nick Snowden

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether official inquiries are an effective method for holding the medical profession to account for failings in the quality and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether official inquiries are an effective method for holding the medical profession to account for failings in the quality and safety of care.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of the theoretical literature on professions and documentary analysis of key public inquiry documents and reports in the UK National Health Service (NHS) the authors examine how the misconduct of doctors can be understood using the metaphor of professional wrongdoing as a product of bad apples, bad barrels or bad cellars.

Findings

The wrongdoing literature tends to present an uncritical assumption of increasing sophistication in analysis, as the focus moves from bad apples (individuals) to bad barrels (organisations) and more latterly to bad cellars (the wider system). This evolution in thinking about wrongdoing is also visible in public inquiries, as analysis and recommendations increasingly tend to emphasise cultural and systematic issues. Yet, while organisational and systemic factors are undoubtedly important, there is a need to keep in sight the role of individuals, for two key reasons. First, there is growing evidence that a small number of doctors may be disproportionately responsible for large numbers of complaints and concerns. Second, there is a risk that the role of individual professionals in drawing attention to wrongdoing is being neglected.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge this is the first theoretical and empirical study specifically exploring the role of NHS inquiries in holding the medical profession to account for failings in professional practice.

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Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Mike McGrath

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the literature concerning interlending and document supply and related matters.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the literature concerning interlending and document supply and related matters.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is based on the reading of over 150 journals as well as monographs, reports and websites.

Findings

Resistance to the Big Deals for journals is still growing – in particular because of the current budget cuts that are hitting libraries badly but publishers remain complacent. Interesting movements on the copyright front as the Hargreaves report in the UK is accepted by the government and the STM Association gets upset. Patron driven acquisition receives a lot of attention in the literature – when will the world outside of the US pay as much attention?

Originality/value

The paper represents a useful source of information for librarians and others interested in document supply and related matters such as resource sharing and open access.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Rola Chami-Malaeb

The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of two positive organizational factors: the perceived supervisor support (PSS) and the self-efficacy (SE) on nurses'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of two positive organizational factors: the perceived supervisor support (PSS) and the self-efficacy (SE) on nurses' burnout (BO), which concurrently affect the turnover intention (TI) and the mediating role of BO in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey-based study of a sample of 552 Lebanese registered nurses from 19 Lebanese hospitals was conducted.

Findings

The authors’ findings confirm that PSS and SE both reduce the level of BO and the turnover intention significantly. The higher the perceived supervisors' support and the nurses' SE, the less they experience BO. BO has partially mediated the relationship of the PSS and SE on TI. This study reveals that supervisors' support is well perceived by Lebanese nurses, whose s is relatively high, while their levels of BO are considered moderate. However, BO levels vary proportionally with demographic variables, namely age, work experience, gender, marital status and education.

Originality/value

This study provides new evidence on the relationship between PSS, SE and BO and turnover intention of Lebanese nurses. It is unique in studying the role of nurses' SE with regard to BO and TI and improving the quality of nurses' work life. It shows the significance of the supervisors' role in supporting the psychological state of nurses. The context of the study, Lebanon, is also novel as it differs from advanced economies institutionally, culturally and in legal frameworks that govern the employee–supervisor relationships.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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