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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Andreas Diermeier, Dirk Sindersberger, Peter Angele, Richard Kujat and Gareth John Monkman

Ultrasound is a well-established technology in medical science, though many of the conventional measurement systems (hydrophones and radiation force balances [RFBs]) often…

Abstract

Purpose

Ultrasound is a well-established technology in medical science, though many of the conventional measurement systems (hydrophones and radiation force balances [RFBs]) often lack accuracy and tend to be expensive. This is a significant problem where sensors must be considered to be “disposable” because they inevitably come into contact with biological fluids and expense increases dramatically in cases where a large number of sensors in array form are required. This is inevitably the case where ultrasound is to be used for the in vitro growth stimulation of a large plurality of biological samples in tissue engineering. Traditionally only a single excitation frequency is used (typically 1.5 MHz), but future research demands a larger choice of wavelengths for which a single broadband measurement transducer is desirable. Furthermore, because of implementation conditions there can also be large discrepancies between measurements. The purpose of this paper deals with a very cost-effective alternative to expensive RFBs and hydrophones.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilization of cost-effective piezoelectric elements as broadband sensors.

Findings

Very effective results with equivalent (if not better) accuracy than expensive alternatives.

Originality/value

This paper concentrates on how very cost-effective piezoelectric ultrasound transducers can be implemented as sensors for ultrasound power measurements with accuracy as good, if not better than those achievable using radiation force balances or hydrophones.

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