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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Richard Kramer

Persistent and particular health and social care challenges face socially excluded groups and communities in the more deprived areas of the country. Involvement of…

Abstract

Persistent and particular health and social care challenges face socially excluded groups and communities in the more deprived areas of the country. Involvement of communities in design and delivery of services, including those whose voices have traditionally not been heard, will help to shape services to meet better their health and well‐being needs. Effective community‐led commissioning can empower individuals and communities by giving them the chance to voice their needs, while local ownership of the process will increase the relevance of services, and improve their uptake and sustainability. For commissioners, the ‘World Class’ commissioning agenda is about connecting development of services with the real requirements of communities, and increasing engagement and satisfaction with services.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2011

Gemma Bruce, Gerald Wistow and Richard Kramer

Connected Care, Turning Point's model for involving the community in the design and delivery of integrated health and well‐being services, aims to involve the community in…

Abstract

Connected Care, Turning Point's model for involving the community in the design and delivery of integrated health and well‐being services, aims to involve the community in the commissioning process in a way which fundamentally shifts the balance of power in favour of local people. The model has been tested in a number of areas across the country, and previous articles in the Journal of Integrated Care have charted the progress of the original pilot in Hartlepool. Cost‐benefits of the approach are now becoming clearer. Implementation of a new community‐led social enterprise in Hartlepool began in 2007, and today its Connected Care service provides community outreach, information, access to a range of health and social care services, advocacy, co‐ordination and low‐level support to the people of Owton. Key lessons, from Hartlepool and elsewhere, have centred on the value of making the case for service redesign from the ‘bottom up’ and building the capacity of the community to play a role in service delivery, while also promoting strong leadership within commissioning organisations to build ‘top‐down’ support for the implementation of outcomes defined through intensive community engagement. The new Government's ‘localism’ agenda creates new opportunities for community‐led integration, and the Connected Care pilots provide a number of learning points about how this agenda might be successfully progressed.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Richard Kramer

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2017

Jeffery T. Ulmer

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Carl J. Couch and The Iowa School
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-166-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Andrew Gordon

Denied by practitioners and erased from all official documents, the requirement that ex‐users be clean for two years before being employed is supposedly no longer with us…

Abstract

Denied by practitioners and erased from all official documents, the requirement that ex‐users be clean for two years before being employed is supposedly no longer with us. But, as Andrew Gordon reveals, despite the denials, the two‐year rule is alive and kicking and doing its best to keep ex‐users out of work.

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Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Paul Cambridge

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2010

Debra E. Meyerson

I was a doctoral student in the Organizational Behavior (OB) Ph.D. program in the Graduate School of Business (GSB) from 1984 to 1989 and a faithful participant in the…

Abstract

I was a doctoral student in the Organizational Behavior (OB) Ph.D. program in the Graduate School of Business (GSB) from 1984 to 1989 and a faithful participant in the annual Stanford Organizations Conference at Asilomar, on the shores of the Pacific. I worked under the guidance of Professors Joanne Martin, Rod Kramer, Robert Sutton, and James March. I also benefited from the support and guidance of sociology professor Richard Scott in his capacity as director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and National Institute of Aging (NIA) Fellows Training Program in which I was a pre-doctoral fellow from 1985 to 1988. The reflections that follow are based primarily on my experience as a student during this vibrant period, although, as a current a faculty member within the School of Education at Stanford, I cannot resist drawing occasional comparisons between the organizations community then and now.

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Stanford's Organization Theory Renaissance, 1970–2000
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-930-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Lisa Johnson

What is it about academia anyway? We profess to hate it, spend endless amounts of time complaining about it, and yet we in academia will do practically anything to stay…

Abstract

What is it about academia anyway? We profess to hate it, spend endless amounts of time complaining about it, and yet we in academia will do practically anything to stay. The pay may be low, job security elusive, and in the end, it's not the glamorous work we envisioned it would be. Yet, it still holds fascination and interest for us. This is an article about American academic fiction. By academic fiction, I mean novels whosemain characters are professors, college students, and those individuals associated with academia. These works reveal many truths about the higher education experience not readily available elsewhere. We learn about ourselves and the university community in which we work.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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