Search results

1 – 10 of 196
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

L.J. Davies, L.J. Winn and Frederic Sellers

April 8, 1970 Building — Construction regulations — Applicability — Goggles to be provided where any specified process carried on — “Breaking, cutting,…of stone, concrete…

Abstract

April 8, 1970 Building — Construction regulations — Applicability — Goggles to be provided where any specified process carried on — “Breaking, cutting,…of stone, concrete, slag or similar materials” — Whether bricks “similar materials” — Plaintiff demolishing brickwork with hammer and chisel — Injury to eye caused by falling dust — Whether engaged on “process” within the regulation — Failure of employer to provide goggles — Whether in breach of regulation — Whether negligent — Regulation requiring employer to provide protection from falling material — Whether applicable — Construction (General Provisions) Regulations, 1961 (S.I. 1961 No. 1580), regs. 46(1), 52, Sch.(2).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Stuart Redding, Richard Hobbs, Catia Nicodemo, Luigi Siciliani and Raphael Wittenberg

Purpose: In this chapter, we examine the National Health Service (NHS) and Adult Social Care (ASC) in England, focussing on policies that have been introduced since 2000…

Abstract

Purpose: In this chapter, we examine the National Health Service (NHS) and Adult Social Care (ASC) in England, focussing on policies that have been introduced since 2000 and considering the challenges that providers face in their quest to provide a high standard and affordable health service in the near future.

Methodology/Approach: We discuss recent policy developments and published analysis covering innovations within major aspects of health care (primary, secondary and tertiary) and ASC, before considering future challenges faced by providers in England, highlighted by a 2017 UK Parliament Select Committee.

Findings: The NHS and ASC system have experienced tightening budgets and serious financial pressure, with historically low real-terms growth in health funding from central government and local authorities. Policymakers have tried to overcome these challenges with several policy innovations, but many still remain. With large-scale investment and reform, there is potential for the health and social care system to evolve into a modern service capable of dealing with the needs of an ageing population. However, if these challenges are not met, then it is set to continue struggling with a lack of appropriate facilities, an overstretched staff and a system not entirely appropriate for its patients.

Details

The Sustainability of Health Care Systems in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-499-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Roopinder Oberoi

The spotlight of this chapter is to understand the connection between public policy and corporate social responsibility (CSR); in other words – the institutionalization of…

Abstract

The spotlight of this chapter is to understand the connection between public policy and corporate social responsibility (CSR); in other words – the institutionalization of CSR. What is the role of the government for setting standards and mandating for ensuring responsibility? The emerging accepted wisdom in policy and academic circles is that many sustainability solutions are likely to result from institutional (i.e., governance) reform. A perceptive on CSR evolving as an institution of broader societal governance appears as a promising opportunity to delve into at a point in time when conventional rules, actors, and markets that steered the global economy demonstrate to be undergoing credibility crisis. CSR therefore must be considered within the wider field of institutions for governing the corporation and the economy. This chapter is exploratory as it dwells into theoretical underpinning of emerging mandatory CSR as well as provides empirical mapping of corporate responses to the new enacted legislation. The CSR analysis presented is based on a content analysis of the information contained in the annual reports of some prominent companies, government documents, audits reports, companies websites, and newspaper reports, which will provide us evidences of responses of corporates toward the CSR provisions.

Details

Stakeholders, Governance and Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-380-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Simon Deakin, Richard Hobbs, Suzanne Konzelmann and Frank Wilkinson

Prevailing patterns of dispersed share ownership and rules of corporate governance for UK listed companies appear to constrain the ability of managers to make credible…

Abstract

Prevailing patterns of dispersed share ownership and rules of corporate governance for UK listed companies appear to constrain the ability of managers to make credible, long‐term commitments to employees of the kind needed to foster effective labour‐management partnerships. We present case study evidence which suggests that such partnerships can nevertheless emerge where product market conditions and the regulatory environment favour a stakeholder orientation. Proactive and mature partnerships may also be sustained where the board takes a strategic approach to mediating between the claims of different stakeholder groups, institutional investors are prepared to take a long‐term view of their holdings, and strong and independent trade unions are in a position to facilitate organisational change.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jonathan S. Swift

Reports exploratory research which examines the relationship between the extent to which executives have a positive attitude towards a foreign culture and the level of…

Abstract

Reports exploratory research which examines the relationship between the extent to which executives have a positive attitude towards a foreign culture and the level of competence they have achieved in that language. Suggests that this was a weak correlation but a much stronger one existed between these two factors within the Spanish market. Cites that cultural liking may be a positive factor in foreign language acquisition but only in some circumstances or cultures and ecnourages further research in this area.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Dr. COLLINRIDGE, the Medical Officer of Health to the City of London, had occasion recently to call attention to the diseased condition of certain imported meats, and it…

Abstract

Dr. COLLINRIDGE, the Medical Officer of Health to the City of London, had occasion recently to call attention to the diseased condition of certain imported meats, and it is most disquieting to learn that some of these were apparently sent out from the country of origin under official certificates.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ronald Burt De Waal

This is a comprehensive list of books, some pamphlets, and a few sound recordings about or by Ronald (and Nancy) Reagan. Collections of photographs and cartoons as well as…

Abstract

This is a comprehensive list of books, some pamphlets, and a few sound recordings about or by Ronald (and Nancy) Reagan. Collections of photographs and cartoons as well as biographies, political commentary, speeches, quotations and even recipes are represented. Omitted are books in which there is only brief mention of him. The bibliography was compiled in connection with a major exhibit on Ronald Reagan at the Colorado State University Library. It is the author's intention to continue to collect Reagan materials.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

The question of the authority of the British Pharmaceutical Codex has recently been raised in Birmingham. Eight samples sold as “formalin throat tablets” contained amounts…

Abstract

The question of the authority of the British Pharmaceutical Codex has recently been raised in Birmingham. Eight samples sold as “formalin throat tablets” contained amounts of formaldehyde ranging from 4 to 21 mgm.; only three of them contained 9·7 mgm., the amount ordered by the Codex. Two manufacturing firms informed the vendors that the tablets were made according to “their own private formula.” “Soda mint tablets” differed in composition. Some contained ammonium bicarbonate, as is required by the Codex; in others it was absent. In 1920 the Birmingham Pharmaceutical Association advised its members to use the Codex formula for “Extra strong Seidlitz powders.”—It is reasonable to expect that a drug bought from different pharmacies should be of the same composition. When the synonym is contained in the British Pharmaceutical Codex, published by the authority of the Pharmaceutical Society, the drug should be of the prescribed strength, unless the difference is declared by label. The Codex compilers should realise the results arising from the fixing of a standard for a popular drug. Ammoniated quinine tablets have been found to be almost devoid of the ammonium bicarbonate ordered by the Codex. According to the official reports, during the last ten years, 5·5 per cent. of “medicated lozenges and tablets” have been condemned.—The position of proprietary medicines is made more definite in the Act of 1938. Such an article is genuine if “supplied in response to a demand for that medicine” (section 4). Action can only be taken by a manufacturer if a substitute be sold under the name of his article. The recent practice, however, of avoiding stamp duty by giving the composition of the medicine on the label, has enabled action to be taken under the Food and Drugs Act, if the composition does not agree with the label. Two Birmingham samples illustrate this. An eye lotion was stated on the label to contain definite quantities of borax, boric acid, sodium salicylate and zinc sulphate. It contained about half the stated quantities. A rubbing lotion claimed to contain 94·8 per cent. of industrial alcohol, but only 77 per cent. was found. False claims have been made for vitamin contents. A sample of “cod‐liver oil tablets” was practically free from vitamin A, yet claimed to be “250 times as rich in vitamins as the very best butter.” In each case the article was sold by the vendor as received. Pharmacists should realise the risk of an action for “false label” when the composition of the article does not agree with the label. Had the recent proposals in the Budget been carried, it is probable that labels would have ceased to state the composition of medicines. If such a statement be not given, it would be impossible to protect a purchaser by action under the Food and Drugs Act. An important addition in the new Act is that an advertisement, as well as a label, is evidence as to the composition of a medicine. This should have a salutary influence on advertisements claiming, for instance, definite amounts of vitamins in drugs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

This paper aims to describe an award‐winning training program that helped UK electronics business Bourns to improve its products, streamline its working practices, reduce

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe an award‐winning training program that helped UK electronics business Bourns to improve its products, streamline its working practices, reduce its costs, cut delivery times and reinforce a culture of continuous improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains the reasons for the program, the form it took and the results it achieved.

Findings

The paper reveals that the company saved almost £750,000 over the two‐year life of the project, while profits surged by 300 percent in a single year.

Practical implications

The paper describes how the company selected the National Vocational Qualification Level 2 in business‐improvement techniques as an appropriate standard to which to educate its manufacturing staff and technicians.

Social implications

The paper highlights the company's belief that the best ideas come from people who are closest to the problems and that the course in business‐improvement techniques offered employees a wealth of confidence and expertise, plus new ways of working as an individual and as a team.

Originality/value

The paper reveals that the company has encouraged and empowered its people to take part in developing the business through continuous improvement. Clear and positive outcomes have prevailed for both employees and the business, linking to an increase in productivity and profit.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

1 – 10 of 196