Search results

1 – 10 of 796
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1992

Richard Paul Griffin

The NHS is about to embark on the widescale introduction ofperformance‐related pay. A number of recent studies have seriouslyquestioned the efficacy of merit pay…

Downloads
2167

Abstract

The NHS is about to embark on the widescale introduction of performance‐related pay. A number of recent studies have seriously questioned the efficacy of merit pay. Utilizing the expectancy theory of motivation, explains why performance pay is unlikely to motivate NHS staff.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Richard Griffin

This paper seeks to argue that workplace learning evaluation theory and practice is still an emergent field and that this creates a number of challenges for practitioners…

Downloads
3265

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to argue that workplace learning evaluation theory and practice is still an emergent field and that this creates a number of challenges for practitioners and researchers alike.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a descriptive paper based on a critical review of existing approaches and the research literature.

Findings

While programme evaluation has a long history, workplace learning evaluation is yet to establish itself as a distinct field. This has a number of consequences including the lack of a single or settled view on how workplace learning should be evaluated or what specific aspects of learning should be investigated.

Practical implications

The need to demonstrate a return on investment in organisational learning is as pressing as ever. To become more effective training evaluation methods need to be grounded in a theory. This article aims to provide an informed perspective on the current state of workplace evaluation along with insights into how evaluation can be placed on firmer theoretical foundations in order to produce robust findings in a practitioner friendly way.

Originality/value

This paper provides original insights into the development of workplace evaluation approaches and the challenges the field faces.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Gregg W. Etter and Richard Griffin

Law enforcement officers enter police service usually sometime after their 21st birthday. They often remain in police service until they turn 65. To maintain their…

Downloads
1303

Abstract

Purpose

Law enforcement officers enter police service usually sometime after their 21st birthday. They often remain in police service until they turn 65. To maintain their professional skills and re‐certify their licenses as law enforcement officers, they must complete in‐service training hours. The purpose of this study is to estimate the current number of law enforcement officers over 40 years old and to explore possible andragogical solutions to existing in‐service training methodologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The Police Officer Standard and Training (POST) organizations were contacted in all 50 States in a telephone survey.

Findings

Police training requirements vary widely between States. There are a large number of older law enforcement officers that require in‐service training. This population might be better served using andragogical training techniques.

Research limitations/implications

Although this was a nationwide study, there were certain limitations that must be considered. Only State, county, and municipal law enforcement officers were included in this study. No federal law enforcement officers or agencies were included in this study.

Originality/value

The findings show the extent and amount of in‐service training that law enforcement agencies are required to provide their employees and will be of interest to those in that field.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Richard Griffin

This article seeks to review the current state of workplace learning evaluation, to set out the rationale for evaluation along with the barriers that practitioners face…

Downloads
2633

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to review the current state of workplace learning evaluation, to set out the rationale for evaluation along with the barriers that practitioners face when seeking to assess the effectiveness of training and development. Finally, it aims to propose a scientifically robust and practitioner friendly approach to evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on a multi disciplinary literature review.

Findings

Despite the substantial investment in workplace learning there is a paucity of evaluation activity. There are a wide range of reasons for this including capacity and capability issues, lack of supportive organisational environment and a lack of effective measurement instruments. There is also a large research to practice gap. The starting point for evaluation approaches should be the needs of practitioners. Latest research on training suggests that effective evaluation approaches should adopt a stakeholder and systems approach and collect corroborative data.

Research limitations/implications

This article presents research findings, based on a multidisciplinary literature review, on the factors that inhibit effective workplace learning evaluation, sets out a novel evaluation framework and approach, grounded in a conceptual model of workplace learning.

Practical implications

The findings seek to assist practitioners such as learning and development professionals undertake more robust and efficient evaluations. The article also addresses the research to practice gap.

Originality/value

This article presents a novel approach to workplace learning evaluation.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2003

Jonathan L Gifford

Abstract

Details

Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Richard Paul Griffin

This paper seeks to address current limitations in approaches to training evaluation by presenting a conceptual model of work‐based learning and an associated evaluation framework.

Downloads
4766

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to address current limitations in approaches to training evaluation by presenting a conceptual model of work‐based learning and an associated evaluation framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The model and framework presented in this paper are based on a critical review of current approaches to learning evaluation and insights from learning transfer research and programme theory.

Findings

This paper sets out a conceptual model of workplace learning based on five elements: a pre‐learning stage, the trigger (need) for learning, the learning event, application of learning and the impact of learning. A linked criterion evaluation framework is also described. It is proposed that this provides a scientifically robust but practitioner friendly framework for workplace learning evaluation.

Practical implications

While most organisations wish to evaluate the effectiveness of their investment in employee training and development, few do. One of the barriers to effective learning evaluation is the failure to ground approaches in a contemporary and comprehensive model of workplace learning. The model and framework set out in this paper aim to assist evaluation by addressing this gap in a practitioner friendly way.

Originality/value

This paper sets out a novel, flexible and comprehensive conceptual model of workplace learning along with an innovative approach to training evaluation that addresses limitations in existing approaches. It is hoped that this will contribute to the debate on appropriate evaluation methods and assist practitioners to undertake evaluation in a more credible manner.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Richard Paul Griffin

This paper aims to briefly review the current state of and rationale for workplace training evaluation, explain the barriers that prevent wide scale and effective

Downloads
6336

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to briefly review the current state of and rationale for workplace training evaluation, explain the barriers that prevent wide scale and effective evaluation and provide practitioners with a novel training evaluation approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on a critical review of current approaches to and literature on training evaluation and the author's own research into the impact of learning on NHS productivity.

Findings

Whilst national governments stress the importance of workplace skills development as a central element of economic growth and organizations invest substantial amounts in training, very few private firms or public sector organizations actually review learning's impact on individuals, teams or organizational results.

Practical implications

This paper proposes that a range of factors inhibit effective training evaluation. These include the complexity of workplace learning and, crucially, weaknesses in current evaluation processes and tools. In response, the author sets out a novel systematic evaluation process aimed at assisting practitioners in meeting these challenges.

Originality/value

The approach builds on the economic theory of productivity to create a metric of costs and benefits to allow organizations to assess the impact of learning. It is hoped the approach will firstly, contribute to the debate about how training should be evaluated; secondly, bridge the gap between academic research and practitioner needs and finally, provide a scientifically robust but practitioner friendly means of evaluation.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2013

Miqdad Asaria, Susan Griffin and Richard Cookson

In this chapter we discuss the cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of public health interventions where there are combined, and potentially conflicting, objectives of…

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss the cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of public health interventions where there are combined, and potentially conflicting, objectives of increasing total population health and reducing unfair health inequalities in the population. Our focus is on identifying appropriate health inequality measures in this context to quantify the impacts of interventions on unfair health inequality and, where necessary, analyse equity-efficiency trade-offs between improving total population health and reducing unfair health inequality. We recognise that this requires a number of important social value judgements to be made, and so prefer measures that facilitate transparency about these social value judgements. We briefly summarise the literature on health inequality and health-related social welfare functions, and conclude that while valuable it is not entirely suitable for our purpose. We borrow instead from the wider literature on economic inequality, highlighting how this translates to a health setting, and identify appropriate measures for CEA. We conclude with a stylised example illustrating how we would apply a battery of dominance rules and social welfare indices to evaluate the health distributions associated with two hypothetical health interventions.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2019

Lorien Pratt

Abstract

Details

Link
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-654-9

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Sara Cervai and Tauno Kekale

Downloads
1

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

1 – 10 of 796