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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Jane Whitney Gibson, Richard M. Hodgetts and Jorge M. Herrera

This paper discusses the lives and contributions of five key members of the Management History Division: Arthur G. Bedeian; Alfred A. Bolton; James C. Worthy (now…

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2950

Abstract

This paper discusses the lives and contributions of five key members of the Management History Division: Arthur G. Bedeian; Alfred A. Bolton; James C. Worthy (now deceased); Charles D. Wrege; and Daniel A. Wren. Each has proved himself a teacher and intellectual leader in matters of fundamental concern to management history.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Jane Whitney Gibson, Richard M. Hodgetts and Charles W. Blackwell

This paper reports the results of a Management History Division survey within the Academy of Management which investigated the current status and future direction of…

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3053

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a Management History Division survey within the Academy of Management which investigated the current status and future direction of management history teaching in the management curriculum and the role and direction of the Management History Division in general. Comparisons were made to a similar 1989 survey. While management history as a separate course remains elusive, management history continues to be taught in other mainstream management courses. The role of the Management History Division is seen as critical in encouraging others to teach management history. Significant accomplishments have been made in this area since the earlier survey including an expanded Executive Committee, a revised newsletter, new awards for service in the field, and the initiation of the Journal of Management History as an outlet for publication in the field.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Larry C. Giunipero and Richard R. Brand

The concept and importance of supply chain management (SCM) has been introduced and described at length in the literature. Several mostly conceptual definitions of SCM…

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5465

Abstract

The concept and importance of supply chain management (SCM) has been introduced and described at length in the literature. Several mostly conceptual definitions of SCM were found. To classify these multiple definitions and extend SCM to include a process orientation a conceptual model of SCM evolution was developed. This research proposes that SCM is an evolving concept with individual firms at different stages in their adoption of the concept. In its most advanced form SCM is not a subset of logistics but is a broad strategy which cuts across business processes both within the firm and through the channels required to reach the customer and involves the firm's suppliers. Thus SCM as a concept is organization‐wide; not logistics‐specific. An exploratory study of purchasing professionals was performed and it was determined that their definitions of SCM focused on developing relations with suppliers including partnerships. SCM provided purchasers multiple benefits including improved supplier coordination. This improved coordination resulted in greater commitment to long‐term supplier relations, with a focus on reducing cost to the buying organization.

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The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2014

Terry Nichols Clark

This volume outlines a new framework for analysis of democratic participation and economic growth. The new framework joins two past traditions. Their background histories…

Abstract

This volume outlines a new framework for analysis of democratic participation and economic growth. The new framework joins two past traditions. Their background histories are clearly separate. Democratic participation ideas come mostly from Alexis de Tocqueville, while innovation/bohemian ideas driving the economy are largely inspired by Joseph Schumpeter and Jane Jacobs. New developments building on these core ideas are detailed in the first two sections of this volume. But these chapters in turn show that more detailed work within each tradition leads to an integration of the two: participation joins innovation. This is the main theme in the book’s third section, the buzz around arts and culture organizations, and how and why they are critical drivers for the new democratic politics and cutting edge economies. Buzz enters as a new resource, with new rules of the game. It does not dominate; it parallels other activities which continue.

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Can Tocqueville Karaoke? Global Contrasts of Citizen Participation, the Arts and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-737-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Gert‐Jan Hospers and Roy van Dalm

The paper aims to explore to what extent policy makers can create a “creative city”, that is, an urban environment capable of generating creativity, innovation and thus

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5007

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore to what extent policy makers can create a “creative city”, that is, an urban environment capable of generating creativity, innovation and thus economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is set up as an interview with Richard Florida and his mentor Jane Jacobs, two of today's most famous specialists on urban development.

Findings

The main conclusion from the double interview is that a creative city cannot be built from scratch; however, both Florida and Jacobs argue that it is still possible to build for the creative city.

Research limitations/implications

The paper documents the viewpoints of just two urban specialists whose original views, however, have influenced and will influence the debate on creative cities.

Practical implications

The interviewees in this paper offer illuminating insights and practical clues for policy makers wanting to contribute to the development of a creative city.

Originality/value

This is the first double interview with Florida and Jacobs offering policy advice in the field of creative cities. The paper also shows that the views of both authors are complementary.

Details

Foresight, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Book part
Publication date: 14 February 2008

Brenda Parker

In the seemingly perpetual battle among cities to secure economic growth, one strategy has gained increasing credence of late: luring the Creative Class. The argument…

Abstract

In the seemingly perpetual battle among cities to secure economic growth, one strategy has gained increasing credence of late: luring the Creative Class. The argument, promulgated by Professor of Economic Development Richard Florida (2002a, pp. 4–5), suggests that human creativity is now the “decisive source of competitive advantage” and cities can thrive by tapping and harnessing such creativity. The primary ingredients in this sweeping recipe for urban success are a group of young, mobile, diverse, ‘creative’ professionals, who constitute a social class of their own, according to Florida's popular book, The Rise of the Creative Class (2002). This Creative Class – if cities can attract and retain it – operates as its own economic machine, producing jobs, enhancing productivity, and increasing the overall well being of the city, Florida argues. From an urban economic development perspective, the role of the city is to create the conditions in which this Creative Class and associated industries can flourish.

Details

Gender in an Urban World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1477-5

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2020

Jaclyn K. Schwartz, Mavara Agrawal, Ingris Treminio, Sofia Espinosa, Melissa Rodriguez and Lynne Richard

Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience significant health-care disparities across physical and mental health domains resulting in poorer health and quality…

Abstract

Purpose

Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience significant health-care disparities across physical and mental health domains resulting in poorer health and quality of life. Poor transitions to adult care negatively impact the health of adults with ASD. Current research focuses on personal factors in research samples that lack diversity. The purpose of this study is to examine the lived health-care experiences of geographically and ethnically diverse young adults with ASD in adult care settings in the USA to understand provider and system-level factors affecting their health.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine caregivers of young adults with ASD participated in key informant interviews describing their experiences in navigating the health-care system. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach.

Findings

The data indicated that limited quantity of services, poor quality of services, and high cost of services had a negative effect on the health of adults with ASD. Issues cascaded to become more complex.

Practical implications

Practical implications for payors, providers, persons with ASD and their families are discussed in this paper.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study answers the call to better understand system-level factors affecting the health of geographically and ethnically diverse people with ASD.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2019

Laurent Choain and Tyra Malzy

The purpose of this paper is to share how a professional service firm transposed Richard Florida’s “Creative Class” concept from the urban environment into a corporate one…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share how a professional service firm transposed Richard Florida’s “Creative Class” concept from the urban environment into a corporate one for the purpose of organisational change. The validity of Florida’s concept is not here reviewed; rather, the paper is a case study on how his theory – that talent, technology and tolerance compose the high-value triptych driving a city’s growth and attractiveness – can be appropriated by HR to trigger profound changes in corporate governance and culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a return on experience of a project that was implemented at Mazars, an international mid-cap of 20,000 people in 86 countries, over the course of one year. Approximately, 50 individuals participated in the initiative, lead by the firm’s HR leadership team, which used an under the radar approach based on a revamped version of Owen’s Open Space Technology. From an academic perspective, the approach is inspired by Argyris’ action science, and more specifically a derivation of the “double loop learning” where the initial intent of the research might be modified by intermediary findings.

Findings

The paper offers a model for identifying the members of the “creative class” in a corporate environment and a tested approach for integrating the “creative class” into the exclusive and institutional exercise of setting strategy. The cumulative effect of this “unofficial” operation is the creation of unique thought leadership and projects, some of which have now been officially adopted in the four-year strategic plan and institutionalized in the new governance system, results difficult to achieve through conventional approaches.

Research limitations/implications

The case study, which is still in progress, has been implemented in a non-conventional organisation in a very specific industry.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first application of Richard Florida’s urban renewal theory in the corporate environment. This is an example of innovative HR management responding quickly and effectively to the digital, disrupted business landscape. It is designed in the modern managerial spirit of test-and-learn, structured as an agile initiative in an open-source world. It provides a prototype to be replicated and tested in other environments.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2017

Allain Joly

Since Richard Florida’s book The Rise of the Creative Class published in 2000, our attention has been drawn towards a peculiar characteristic of the cities where such a…

Abstract

Since Richard Florida’s book The Rise of the Creative Class published in 2000, our attention has been drawn towards a peculiar characteristic of the cities where such a creative class thrives, and that is tolerance. We intend to explore in this paper whether one can use Hofstede’s “Uncertainty Avoidance” dimension to ponder if societies that are “Uncertainty avoidant” can provide a nurturing soil for a creative class to emerge within their bosom. To discuss this question, we examine the case of the Province of Québec (Canada) and most specifically, that of the city of Montréal, a city that has been dubbed by many observers as a creative city. In other words, our question is can a creative class thrive in a city that is located in an “Uncertainty avoidant” cultural and political unit?

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Jelke Nijboer

The purpose of this research is to show how librarians today need to be cultural entrepreneurs in order to create and maintain thriving libraries in the Internet age.

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2043

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to show how librarians today need to be cultural entrepreneurs in order to create and maintain thriving libraries in the Internet age.

Design/methodology/approach

The “creative class” theory developed by Richard Florida (2002) has been widely and rapidly embraced by many policy makers around the world.

Findings

Cultural entrepreneurship in libraries is in line with a new and dominant trend seen in many countries in which cities promote themselves as centres of creativity. It is creativity, not the traditional values of trading in goods and services, that is now seen to be the force behind economic growth, especially in metropolitan areas. Growth is mainly determined by the ability to attract creative people, develop a creative atmosphere and build creative clusters.

Practical implications

This creativity development and the interest of local authorities in the creative industry are both opportunities for librarians to promote their libraries and demonstrate their ability to act as cultural entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

What are possible successful strategies for libraries and which competences do librarians need to be successful cultural entrepreneurs?

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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