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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

D.A.T. Southgate and Richard Faulks

While the scientific reaction to many of the claims made for the benefits of dietary fibre is ‘it's too good to be true’, there is wide acceptance by the general public…

Abstract

While the scientific reaction to many of the claims made for the benefits of dietary fibre is ‘it's too good to be true’, there is wide acceptance by the general public and the media that an increased intake of dietary fibre is a good thing. There is, however, still confusion about what dietary fibre is and how much there is in foods and the diet. In this, the first of two articles, Professor D.A.T. Southgate and Richard Faulks, of the AFRC Institute of Food Research, Norwich attempt to answer the basic question, what is dietary fibre?

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 88 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Paul Finglas and Richard Faulks

During the last 30 years there have been many and dramatic changes to the pattern of potato production and distribution in the UK. Varieties and cultural techniques have…

Abstract

During the last 30 years there have been many and dramatic changes to the pattern of potato production and distribution in the UK. Varieties and cultural techniques have changed and so, too, have post‐harvest handling, storage, marketing and distribution. Any or all of these might have had an effect on the nutritional value of the potato but whether this was so was not known until a two‐year nutritional evaluation of retail potatoes in the UK was recently completed. This work was financed by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and carried out by Paul Finglas and Richard Faulks at the Food Research Institute, Norwich.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 85 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

David A.T. Southgate and Richard M. Faulks

Evaluating the hypothesis that dietary fibre is a protective factor and interpretation of the nutritional advice to ‘eat more fibre’ is dependent on quantitative…

Abstract

Evaluating the hypothesis that dietary fibre is a protective factor and interpretation of the nutritional advice to ‘eat more fibre’ is dependent on quantitative measurements of dietary fibre. The analysis poses several very difficult analytical issues. Firstly there are the technical issues which arise whenever one analyses a complex mixture, especially of carbohydrates. Secondly, because different components exert different physiological effects, there is a need to characterise as well as quantify the dietary fibre if one wishes to understand or predict its effects; and thirdly, the definition of dietary fibre is couched in physiological terms that do not lend themselves to translation into analytical procedures.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 89 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1981

Richard Faulks

When the potato gained popular acceptance as a food item in the UK about 200 years ago it quickly became, and has remained, a major component of the diet. The reasons for…

Abstract

When the potato gained popular acceptance as a food item in the UK about 200 years ago it quickly became, and has remained, a major component of the diet. The reasons for its popularity are both agronomic and culinary. The potato is easily cultivated in our temperate climate and gives good yields even if harvested immature in summer, as often happened, to fill the gap between cereal harvests. The potato has a natural dormant period which allows it to be stored through the winter months when other fresh vegetables are in short supply. It lends itself readily to a wide range of cooking methods of which the most common are chipped, boiled, mashed, roast and baked, although it can also be made into flour and used to replace or extend wheat flour in certain baked foods. So well established has the potato become that it is now difficult to envisage a hot cooked meal without potatoes — despite the popularity and convenience of pastas and rice.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 81 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Richard Faulks and Joanne Belsten

Modern food processing methods and the widespread ownership of both domestic and catering microwave ovens have permitted rapid growth in the production of a wide range of…

Abstract

Modern food processing methods and the widespread ownership of both domestic and catering microwave ovens have permitted rapid growth in the production of a wide range of frozen and cook‐chill foods for retail and catering use.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 91 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Richard Faulks

The texture of cooked potato is an amalgam of those physical characteristics perceived during preparation and consumption. They may range from a visual assessment of…

Abstract

The texture of cooked potato is an amalgam of those physical characteristics perceived during preparation and consumption. They may range from a visual assessment of disintegration and flouriness, hardness or crispness, physical work needed to mash, cut, or penetrate with a fork, through to the more subtle sensations of bite, smoothness or graininess sensed in the mouth. Different criteria for the assessment of textural quality will be applied to different cooked potato products, such as boiled, mashed, chipped, roast or baked potatoes, and it is therefore important to understand the underlying physical, compositional and chemical properties of the tuber and how they contribute to the production of textural attributes.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 86 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Richard Faulks and Sue Southon

Notes that of 600 carotenoids found in nature, only 40 are regularly consumed by humans. Looks at the biological functions of carotenoids. Reports on studies with regard…

397

Abstract

Notes that of 600 carotenoids found in nature, only 40 are regularly consumed by humans. Looks at the biological functions of carotenoids. Reports on studies with regard to the effects on health carotenoid‐rich diets.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 97 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

M.R. Denning, Edmund Davies and L.J. Lawton

June 22,1972 Damages — Remoteness — Negligence — Economic loss — Contractors damaging cable supplying electricity to factory — Physical damage to metal in factory's…

Abstract

June 22,1972 Damages — Remoteness — Negligence — Economic loss — Contractors damaging cable supplying electricity to factory — Physical damage to metal in factory's furnace as result of power cut — Loss of profit from “melt” and from further melts which would have taken place if no power cut — Whether economic loss recoverable — Whether economic loss attaching to physical loss recoverable — Doctrine of parasitic damages.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2005

Richard Iles

Abstract

Details

Public Transport in Developing Countries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045681-2

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Richard W. Schwester

The touted benefits of inter-governmental contracting are cost savings and simplicity when compared to shared service agreements. Some managers and public officials resist…

Abstract

The touted benefits of inter-governmental contracting are cost savings and simplicity when compared to shared service agreements. Some managers and public officials resist contracting given the assumption that there may be a drop-off in service quality. However, inter-governmental contracting introduces market forces which theoretically would improve performance while keeping costs per unit of output low (Boyne, 1998). This paperexamines municipal police contracting in the State of New Jersey, the purpose of which is to determine if there are statistically significant differences in non-violent crime rates among municipalities that maintain their own police force versus those that contract with neighboring municipalities for police services. Contracting costs are also explored. While summary statistics indicate lower non-violent crime rates among municipalities that maintain their own police force compared to those that contract for police services, multiple regression results indicate that contracting does not predict higher non-violent crime rates at the .05 level. Therefore, contracting for police services should be explored as an alternative municipal policing model.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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