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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Richard E. Boyatzis

Development of competencies needed to be effective managers and leaders requires research and theory that can drive future scholarship and application. This introductory…

Abstract

Purpose

Development of competencies needed to be effective managers and leaders requires research and theory that can drive future scholarship and application. This introductory essay to this special issue of JMD seeks to focus on competencies in organizations in Europe and a broader conceptualization of emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

Competencies are defined and an overview is provided for the papers that will follow with original research on competencies, their link to performance in various occupations, and their development.

Findings

Emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies predict effectiveness in professional, management and leadership roles in many sectors of society. It addition, these competencies can be developed in adults.

Research limitations/implications

As an introductory essay, the paper lays the foundation for the following papers in this issue.

Practical implications

Competencies needed in order to be effective can be developed.

Originality/value

Despite widespread application, there are few published studies of the empirical link between competencies and performance. There are even fewer published studies showing that they can be developed. The special issue will add to both literatures. There is widespread confusion as to the definition of emotional intelligence; the paper offers some clarification.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Richard E. Boyatzis and Argun Saatcioglu

Development of competencies needed to be effective managers and leaders requires program design and teaching methods focused on learning. The paper presents an update and…

Abstract

Purpose

Development of competencies needed to be effective managers and leaders requires program design and teaching methods focused on learning. The paper presents an update and a view of 20 years of attempting to develop these competencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 14 longitudinal studies of the impact of a particular MBA program on developing emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies are reviewed. Three new studies are to complete a 20‐year perspective. This is a value added design. It asks how are the graduates different from when they entered the program?

Findings

Emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies that predict effectiveness in management and leadership can be developed in adults through a graduate management program. These improvements can sustain out as far as seven years. But this degree of value added can be eroded by a tumultuous organizational climate.

Research limitations/implications

It is a series of 17 longitudinal studies on one school. With support from four studies of a program for 45‐65 year‐old executives.

Practical implications

Competencies needed to be effective can be developed. But that development can be eroded without continuous improvement and renewal.

Originality/value

Few sets of multiyear, multi‐cohort, multi‐method, multitrait studies exist. This helps to build a new literature on learning and development, as well as focusing on development of competencies.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Laura Guillén Ramo, Willem E. Saris and Richard E. Boyatzis

The objective of this paper is to address the predictive validity of the behavioral approach of EI by Boyatzis and Goleman. There are two research questions guiding this…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to address the predictive validity of the behavioral approach of EI by Boyatzis and Goleman. There are two research questions guiding this study: emotional and social competencies are positively and significantly related with job performance; and emotional and social competencies will be more successful in predicting performance than universal personality dimensions, like the Big Five personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the data of three medium‐sized Spanish organizations (n=223) that were involved in a competency management project based on emotional and social competencies. SPSS and structural modeling techniques available in the SEM program LISREL 8.51 software are used to enter the empirical analyses of the paper.

Findings

Results show that emotional competencies and personality traits are valuable predictors of job performance as measured by the nominations procedure in the study. In addition, competencies seem to be more powerful predictors of performance than global personality traits.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is small.

Practical implications

The paper will provide reflective practitioners with useful conceptual and developmental handles for emotional competencies within organizations.

Originality/value

The paper helps to build a body of research that contributes to overcoming the paucity of evidence for the predictive validity of EI measures claimed by many authors.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Robert J. Emmerling and Richard E. Boyatzis

Continued research on the assessment and development of emotional and social intelligence competencies represents an opportunity to further both theoretical and applied…

Abstract

Purpose

Continued research on the assessment and development of emotional and social intelligence competencies represents an opportunity to further both theoretical and applied applications of behavioral science to the management of human capital. While the field has continued to expand over the preceding decades, research has often trailed application, especially as it relates to cross‐cultural validity. The purpose of this introductory essay to this special issue of CCM serves to focus on cultural issues related to applied use of competencies in diverse cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

Emotional and social intelligence competencies are defined and an overview provided for the papers that will follow, with original research linking these constructs to performance in various occupations and cultures, as well as issues related to their development.

Findings

Emotional and social intelligence competencies are found to represent a practical and theoretically coherent, reliable and valid approach to assessing and developing individuals in diverse cultures.

Research limitations/implications

As an introductory essay, the paper lays the foundation for the following articles in this special issue.

Originality/value

Although competencies are in widespread use around the world, issues related to cross‐cultural validation are seldom studied empirically. This introductory essay and subsequent articles will help clarify emotional and social competencies as a behavioral approach to applying emotional intelligence to the practical needs of organizations.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Richard E. Boyatzis and Franco Ratti

The purpose of this study is to report data showing competencies that distinguish effective managers and leaders in a large Italian company and in Italian cooperatives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to report data showing competencies that distinguish effective managers and leaders in a large Italian company and in Italian cooperatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of analysis competencies coded from 51 interviews and 53,360 assessments of managers and leaders comparing more and less effective managers and leaders.

Findings

Emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies predict effectiveness in management and leadership roles in a variety of Italian organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Although each sample is small, together they create a basis for future confirmatory research.

Practical implications

Competencies needed to be effective can be identified.

Originality/value

The paper and the studies reported are the first to be published showing competencies that distinguish effectiveness in Italian managers and leaders.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Richard E. Boyatzis

Change, and in particular intentional or desired change, has not been understood nor systematically studied. By applying concepts from complexity theory to intentional…

Abstract

Purpose

Change, and in particular intentional or desired change, has not been understood nor systematically studied. By applying concepts from complexity theory to intentional change theory, the purpose of this paper is to provide a new level of insight into why and how sustainable desired change can occur at all levels of human/social interaction, from individual to teams to organizations to communities, countries and the globe.

Design/methodology/approach

Using research from over 30 years of longitudinal studies of individual and organizational change, the concepts are explored and implications proposed.

Findings

Sustainable, intentional change is on the whole discontinuous. It occurs through a series of five discoveries or emergence conditions. It is driven by the interplay of the positive and negative emotional attractor. It follows the described process at all fractals of human organization.

Research limitations/implications

Extensive empirical research has been done at the individual level, but only case studies at the organization and country levels.

Practical implications

Every person seeking to explore, understand, or facilitate sustainable, desired change can be helped by the model and understanding how it functions.

Originality/value

The theory of intentional change is relatively new to the literature, as is the use of complexity theory.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2009

Melvin L. Smith, Ellen B. Van Oosten and Richard E. Boyatzis

In this chapter, we offer a definition of a particular type of coaching, one focused on achieving sustained, desired change in the individual being coached. We also…

Abstract

In this chapter, we offer a definition of a particular type of coaching, one focused on achieving sustained, desired change in the individual being coached. We also discuss a theory of intentional change, which we suggest explains why coaching in this manner indeed leads to sustained, desired change in individuals. We explore the coaching relationship in terms of the quality of the relationship and the competencies required by those who create that relationship. We also suggest that coaching has two faces: coaching with compassion and coaching for compliance. The latter often takes the form of trying to help someone in need. In these situations, the desire to help overcomes the knowledge that arousing motivation to change is more important than a short-term fix. We further offer that potential benefits exist in terms of the compassion one experiences from coaching others and we address the risk of not doing so. We provide a guide for the coaching process. And finally, we conclude with a discussion of the implications for future research on coaching and leadership development.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-547-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Kleio Akrivou, Richard. E. Boyatzis and Poppy L. McLeod

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical framework for understanding and formulating team intentional change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical framework for understanding and formulating team intentional change.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a critical review of existing theories of group development, gaps in the literature regarding how teams can and should develop, especially when the change is intentional and has a desired direction, are examined. A set of propositions is offered to address these aspects of group development that have been neglected by the literature.

Findings

A systematic and critical discussion of the core literature on group development showed: the complex and discontinuous nature of change in groups was neglected, because the group was not treated as a complex system; the literature has not dealt with group development processes when the change process is intentional (it has been descriptive of what occurs), nor has it examined which are key drivers of group change; existing literature on group development have predominantly seen negative emotion as catalytic to group development, and they have ignored the role of positive emotion. Therefore, drawing on positive psychology, complexity theory, small group research literatures, and Boyatzis' intentional change theory, a prescriptive theoretical framework for explaining intentional group change and development is offered and discussed.

Originality/value

A prescriptive model or theoretical framework with a set of hypotheses are proposed that explain intentional, and positive group development processes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Richard E. Boyatzis

The purpose of this paper is to show that development of competencies needed to be effective managers and leaders requires program design and teaching methods focused on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that development of competencies needed to be effective managers and leaders requires program design and teaching methods focused on learning. This is the introductory essay to this special issue of JMD.

Design/methodology/approach

Competencies are defined and an overview is provided for the eight papers that will follow with original research on competencies, their link to performance in various occupations, and their development.

Findings

Emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies predict effectiveness in professional, management and leadership roles in many sectors of society. In addition, these competencies can be developed in adults.

Research limitations/implications

As an introductory essay, this lays the foundation for the papers in this issue.

Practical implications

Competencies needed to be effective can be developed.

Originality/value

Despite widespread application, there are few published studies of the empirical link between competencies and performance. There are even fewer published studies showing that they can be developed. This special issue will add to both literatures.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Richard E. Boyatzis and Kleio Akrivou

If the ideal self is the emotional driver of intentional change, the purpose of this paper is to explore the components of a person's personal vision and how it comes from…

Abstract

Purpose

If the ideal self is the emotional driver of intentional change, the purpose of this paper is to explore the components of a person's personal vision and how it comes from their ideal self.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the concept of the ideal self from intentional change theory, the paper examines a variety of theoretical foundations, from psychoanalytic to positive psychology. Each views the ideal self and its components as deficiencies needing therapeutic intervention or the heights of human experience and intrinsic motivation.

Findings

The ideal self is a primary source of positive affect and psychophysiological arousal helping provide the drive for intentional change. Many current frameworks or theories examine only portions of this model and, therefore, leave major components unaddressed. The ideal self is composed of three major components: an image of a desired future; hope (and its constituents, self‐efficacy and optimism); and a comprehensive sense of one's core identity (past strengths, traits, and other enduring dispositions).

Originality/value

Intentional change is hard work and often fails because of lack of sufficient drive and the proper intrinsic motivation for it. This model of the ideal self creates a comprehensive context within which a person (or at other fractals, a group or system) can formulate why they want to adapt, evolve, or maintain their current desired state.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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