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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Herbert Sherman and Daniel J. Rowley

Stephen Hodgetts read the e-mail over and over again and still could hardly believe what he had read. He had just come back from his vacation, well rested and refreshed…

Abstract

Stephen Hodgetts read the e-mail over and over again and still could hardly believe what he had read. He had just come back from his vacation, well rested and refreshed, and this e-mail had dampened his high enthusiasm. It took time to absorb such bad news and for Hodgetts to get over his incredulity.Yet in the end Hodgetts accepted the truth‐a deep, dark terrible truth that would not go away. Robert Davis, his business partner’s son, had confirmed in an e-mail his worst fears about their newest business partner, David Russ.Many thoughts were running through his mind simultaneously yet each screamed to be heard.“How could he and his partner Richard Davis have been so blind, so trusting?” “How could Russ not have heeded the advice of his business partner, Richard Davis, Russ’s former English professor?” And most important, “What was now going to happen to their new business?” Yet the one thought that continued to echo among them all was surprisingly a quote from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s beloved character, Sherlock Holmes: “But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world without them.”

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Herbert Sherman and Daniel J. Rowley

“I quit.” Those two little words were dropped like an atomic bomb and seemed to explode across the dinner table at the Davis residence. The meal had not yet been served…

Abstract

“I quit.” Those two little words were dropped like an atomic bomb and seemed to explode across the dinner table at the Davis residence. The meal had not yet been served though everyone was at the table engaged in a lively discussion, which of course included their business, DHR Patio Homes, LLC. Immediately, a hush descended upon the Davis family and their guest, close friend, and business associate, Stephen Hodgetts, as an imaginary mushroom cloud filled the room. No one could move or say a word although numerous glances of varying nature were being exchanged in rapid succession. The somberness of the situation was quickly broken, however, by another barrage of discontent. “I've had it, I quit. Find someone else to act as the contractor for the company.” With those words, RJ Davis quickly vacated the dining room and zoomed upstairs into the Davisesʼ spare garage apartment.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Richard Davis

Discusses whether there is any business sense in organizations acting ethically, i.e. whether it is profitable. Examines various ethical companies and their behaviour…

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Abstract

Discusses whether there is any business sense in organizations acting ethically, i.e. whether it is profitable. Examines various ethical companies and their behaviour. Debates whether or not it pays organizations to sell ethical products and treat both customers and employees ethically.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Arun Kumar Kaushik and Zillur Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the various antecedent beliefs predicting customers’ attitudes toward, and adoption of, self-service technologies (SSTs) available…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the various antecedent beliefs predicting customers’ attitudes toward, and adoption of, self-service technologies (SSTs) available in the banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive research design with survey approach is used to develop and test a conceptual model of adoption for all three self-service banking technologies (SSBTs).

Findings

The results of the comparative analysis showed that antecedent beliefs affecting adopters’ attitude vary across different SSBTs. It extends and tests the technology acceptance model (TAM) by including two additional antecedents from the theories of adoption behavior.

Research limitations/implications

All three SSBTs included in the paper are from the banking industry, which limits the generalizability of the findings to other industries. Many other limitations were also reported.

Practical implications

The findings reveal why and how customers decide to adopt different SSBTs and why a few SSBTs are more widely accepted than others. The practicality of the findings guides managers and designers of technological interfaces.

Social implications

People will also benefit from the effective implementation of SSTs.

Originality/value

This study stands out as one of the early studies to empirically examine the antecedents-attitude-intention relationship across different SSBTs available in Indian banking industry.

Retraction notice

The International Journal of Bank Marketing wishes to retract the article Kaushik, A.K. and Rahman, Z. (2015), “Innovation adoption across self-service banking technologies in India”, published in International Journal of Bank Marketing, Vol. 33, No. 2, pp. 96-121.

It has come to our attention that the article contains substantial similarities to the following article: Curran, J.M. and Meuter, M.L. (2005), “Self-service technology adoption: comparing three technologies”, Journal of Services Marketing, Vol. 19 No. 2, pp. 103-113, https://doi.org/10.1108/08876040510591411.

The authors have fully cooperated with this investigation and supplied the original dataset for review. Using this dataset, the editorial team were unable to replicate the results included in the article, and as a result, the decision has been made to retract the article.

The International Journal of Bank Marketing author guidelines make it clear that articles must be original and must not infringe any existing copyright.

The journal apologises to both Professor Curran and Professor Meuter, and its readers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Joyce Payne and Aurelia Stephen

If you are 30 or older, you are middle‐aged by someone's criteria. When the college students of the 1970s declared “Don't trust anyone over 30,” did you think they would…

Abstract

If you are 30 or older, you are middle‐aged by someone's criteria. When the college students of the 1970s declared “Don't trust anyone over 30,” did you think they would be someday talking about you? And what about those who say “Life begins at 40”? Did you ever believe them?

Details

Collection Building, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Harold Lazarus and Richard Davis

The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept of organic management and demonstrate how it can be applied in practice.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept of organic management and demonstrate how it can be applied in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides an interview with Rich Davis, a visionary executive.

Findings

Richard Davis is an extremely creative manager who transformed a small, mediocre firm into a large, superbly well‐managed company. Originating as a family retail optical business, today nearly 35 million people enjoy the many benefits of Davis Vision. Your opinions about management, leadership, employees and business problems will never be quite the same after considering the ideas of this master of wholistic, organic, integrative management. For example, associates are considered internal customers and must be delighted first, even before external customers. Associates interact in measurable and effective ways that allows the company to focus on its vision, mission, and goals while embracing a constantly changing environment and grow.

Originality/value

The great wisdom of Richard Davis has been distilled into a very few pages. It is as if the major works of Peter Drucker were so distilled. The editors suggest that you read and reread this short piece.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Herbert Sherman, Adva Dinur and Daniel Rowley

In this two-part case, Richard Davis and Stephen Hodgetts, co-owners of D&H Management LLC, are trying to come to terms with changes in the real estate market‐changes that…

Abstract

In this two-part case, Richard Davis and Stephen Hodgetts, co-owners of D&H Management LLC, are trying to come to terms with changes in the real estate market‐changes that have made their rental homes worth less than their mortgages and at best yielding at most a break-even cash flow. In Part A Davis and Hodgetts are weighing the following options: (1) sell all of the properties, assume a loss (walk away with nothing), and avoid the negative cash flow; (2) walk away from all of the properties, assume a loss (walk away with nothing), and avoid the negative cash flow; (3) delay paying the mortgage on some of the homes, allow these properties, if necessary, to go into foreclosure, and in the interim use the positive cash flow to shore up some of the more positive cash flow homes; (4) contact all of the lenders and try to renegotiate the mortgages so as to have lower monthly rates.

In Part B Davis proposes that he and Hodgetts go their separate ways. Davis walks away with the two properties that have mortgages in his name, while Hodgetts obtains the four properties that have mortgages in his. From Hodgettsʼ perspective this is a losing proposition since (1) he would have to take over the management of four “loser” properties rather than Davisʼs two, an ʼunfairʼ split of the liabilities; (2) he had no interest in managing properties; and (3) he and Davis would be splitting up a long-standing team.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Carolan McLarney and Edward Chung

Culture is an overarching phenomenon that helps individuals make sense of their world. However, culture is not an unchanging “given.” Members of a society actively create…

Abstract

Culture is an overarching phenomenon that helps individuals make sense of their world. However, culture is not an unchanging “given.” Members of a society actively create culture and, through their activities and interactions, sustain or change this culture. In an organizational setting, culture gives meaning to each person’s membership in the social stage that is the workplace. In the process of cultural creation and sustenance, the past is often used as a harbinger of things to come. How an organization effectively uses the past to shape its present culture is a major focus of this study. This article is an ethnographic study of how culture is fabricated, sustained, and renewed in a small advertising firm. The authors propose three interpretive themes – nightmare avoidance, “Richardism,” and dream building – and develop these into a framework using Drucker’s three entrepreneurial strategies. A fourth strategy, creative divergence, emerges from our in‐depth analysis of EMC.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2019

Elizabeth E. Richard, Jeffrey R. Davis, Jin H. Paik and Karim R. Lakhani

This paper presents NASA’s experience using a Center of Excellence (CoE) to scale and sustain an open innovation program as an effective problem-solving tool and includes…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents NASA’s experience using a Center of Excellence (CoE) to scale and sustain an open innovation program as an effective problem-solving tool and includes strategic management recommendations for other organizations based on lessons learned.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper defines four phases of implementing an open innovation program: Learn, Pilot, Scale and Sustain. It provides guidance on the time required for each phase and recommendations for how to utilize a CoE to succeed. Recommendations are based upon the experience of NASA’s Human Health and Performance Directorate, and experience at the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard running hundreds of challenges with research and development organizations.

Findings

Lessons learned include the importance of grounding innovation initiatives in the business strategy, assessing the portfolio of work to select problems most amenable to solving via crowdsourcing methodology, framing problems that external parties can solve, thinking strategically about early wins, selecting the right platforms, developing criteria for evaluation, and advancing a culture of innovation. Establishing a CoE provides an effective infrastructure to address both technical and cultural issues.

Originality/value

The NASA experience spanned more than seven years from initial learnings about open innovation concepts to the successful scaling and sustaining of an open innovation program; this paper provides recommendations on how to decrease this timeline to three years.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1983

RICHARD DAVIS

In the search for methods of improving the management development process, several basic techniques are currently coming to the fore. One of these is coaching and…

Abstract

In the search for methods of improving the management development process, several basic techniques are currently coming to the fore. One of these is coaching and counselling. The author talks about this new and emergent role for management trainers.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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