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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2010

Antonio K.W. Lau, Richard C.M. Yam and Esther P.Y. Tang

Recent studies have advocated the impact of technological innovation capabilities (TIC) on firms' competitive performances. This paper adopts a study framework of…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent studies have advocated the impact of technological innovation capabilities (TIC) on firms' competitive performances. This paper adopts a study framework of innovation audit to examine the relevance of TIC on the innovation performance of the electronics industry in Hong Kong (HK)/Pearl River Delta region.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were acquired through a recent survey of electronics firms in the region. Pearson correlation and regression analysis were employed to examine the relationship between TIC and innovation performance.

Findings

The results verify that R&D, resource allocation, learning, and strategy planning capabilities can significantly improve the innovation sales. R&D and resource allocation capabilities can also significantly improve new product introduction.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to existing literature by studying the impact of TIC on innovation performance in HK. It also explores two out of seven TIC – R&D and resource allocation capabilities – to improve firms' innovation performance in the region.

Originality/value

This paper is one of very few that provide empirical evidence of the TIC and innovation performance in HK. It also revisits the audit framework proposed by recent innovation studies, which helps theoretical development.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy in China, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-552X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

V.M. Rao Tummala, Humphrey Y.H. Lee and Richard C.M. Yam

Hong Kong is facing severe competition and increasing rivalry from the East Asian countries. In order to face these formidable challenges and to seize the opportunities…

Abstract

Hong Kong is facing severe competition and increasing rivalry from the East Asian countries. In order to face these formidable challenges and to seize the opportunities that are available in the global marketplace of the twenty‐first century, Hong Kong manufacturing industries need to implement strategies to become globally competitive. In this paper, the dimensions of global competitiveness and the core competitive strengths of Hong Kong and China are identified and the corresponding hypotheses are formulated. A questionnaire survey conducted to collect and analyze the surveyed data examined the support for these hypotheses. Then the generalized double diamond model is used to analyze the global competitiveness and to recommend the competitive strategies for Hong Kong manufacturing industries. The survey results and the subsequent analysis indicate that Hong Kong manufacturers should integrate Hong Kong’s core competitive strengths with China’s core competitive strengths, and combine them with foreign technologies, management know‐how and global market knowledge to strengthen their global competitiveness.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2005

Richard C.M. Yam and Kit Fai Pun

Action learning motivates students to solve open‐ended problems by “developing skills through doing’. This paper reviews the concept of action learning and discusses the…

Abstract

Action learning motivates students to solve open‐ended problems by “developing skills through doing’. This paper reviews the concept of action learning and discusses the adoption of action learning approach to teach operations management at Universities. It presents the design and delivery of an action‐learning course at City University of Hong Kong. The course incorporates classroom lectures, tutorials and an action‐learning workshop. The experience gained proves that action learning facilitates student participation and teamwork and provides a venue of accelerating learning where enables students to handle dynamic problem situations more effectively. The paper concludes that adopting action‐learning approach can help lecturers to enhance quality teaching in operations management courses, and provide an alternate means of effective paradigm other than traditional classroom teaching and/or computer‐based training at universities.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Antonio K.W. Lau, Richard C.M. Yam and Esther P.Y. Tang

This paper aims to examine how an organization can achieve higher performance through integrating supply chain product co‐development (SCPC) and modular product design.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how an organization can achieve higher performance through integrating supply chain product co‐development (SCPC) and modular product design.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a comprehensive review of literature on product development, supply chain management and system theory, the four proposed hypotheses concerning the relationships among SCPC, product modularity (PM), manufacturing capabilities and product performance (PP) were tested empirically through a sample of 251 Hong Kong manufacturers.

Findings

SCPC is found to have a direct and positive relationship with PM and PP. PM improves flexibility and customer service and in turn PP.

Research limitations/implications

Given the cross‐sectional nature of the study and the focus on manufacturing industry, future research should replicate this study in different industries with more longitudinal studies.

Practical implications

The study provides solid evidence that managers should involve their suppliers, internal functional units and customers early in their design stages, especially in the decisions relating to PM. The study has also demonstrated that product co‐development affects PP in both direct and indirect ways.

Originality/value

The present study empirically verifies the relationships between supply chain integration and modular product design by means of SCPC and PM. Similar empirical research is absent from the literature on relevant disciplines.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 107 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Esther P.Y. Tang and Richard C.M. Yam

Argues that the dichtomy between greater product variety to meet market requirement and a smaller range to save costs has always led to controversy among top executives…

Abstract

Argues that the dichtomy between greater product variety to meet market requirement and a smaller range to save costs has always led to controversy among top executives. Researchers of different disciplines have approached the study of product variety in great depth but none of their work includes environmental considerations. Reports on a survey in Hong Kong which provides empirical evidence of the relationship between product variety and market performance. Concludes first, that previous work has seldom discussed the issues of product variety from an environmental perspective; second, that great product variety leads to irresponsible consumption patterns, i.e. waste; and, third, that firms have not considered the environmental impacts in formulating their product variety strategies.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2010

Antonio K.W. Lau, Richard C.M. Yam and Esther P.Y. Tang

While the beneficial impact of supply chain integration (SCI) and modular product design are generally acknowledged, few empirical studies have examined how an…

Abstract

Purpose

While the beneficial impact of supply chain integration (SCI) and modular product design are generally acknowledged, few empirical studies have examined how an organization can achieve better performance through SCI with modular product design. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between SCI and modular product design, as well as their impact on product performance.

Design/methodology/approach

By surveying 251 manufacturers in Hong Kong, structural equation modelling is used to test the research constructs and the hypothesized model.

Findings

The results confirm that information sharing, product co‐development and organizational coordination are crucial organizational processes within SCI. Companies that have high levels of product modularity appear to be good at product co‐development and organizational coordination directly and at information sharing indirectly. Furthermore, companies that have high levels of product co‐development or product modularity appear to have better product performance.

Research limitations/implications

This paper theoretically and empirically identifies three specific organizational processes within SCI (information sharing, product co‐development and organizational coordination), which affect modular product design and product performance. These more specific findings were previously absent from the literature. However, the study is limited to the cross‐sectional nature of a survey study, the operationalization of SCI and product modularity, and the nature of the product types.

Originality/value

This paper empirically examines the relationships between SCI and product modularity, which has seldom been attempted in previous research. It clearly identifies exactly which processes within SCI are directly and indirectly related to product modularity.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Richard C.M. Yam and Esther P.Y. Tang

Hong Kong has been a major entrepôt for China for decades and its intermediate role has been enhanced in recent years. With the open door policy of China, Hong Kong…

Abstract

Hong Kong has been a major entrepôt for China for decades and its intermediate role has been enhanced in recent years. With the open door policy of China, Hong Kong manufacturers have relocated extensively their low‐cost operations to the Pearl River Delta in Southern China. Under the outward processing arrangement, raw materials, components and work‐in‐progress are shipped to China for further processing and the finished products are shipped back to Hong Kong for re‐export to other countries. This mode of operation has created tremendous loads on the already congested cross‐border traffic between Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta. In order to modernize its outdated and inadequate transportation systems, China has embarked on huge infrastructure development programmes in the Pearl River Delta and other fast developing regions. Hong Kong has also launched multi‐billion‐dollar ports and airport development projects scheduled to be completed in 1997/98. On completion of these projects, the strategic position of Hong Kong as an entrepôt of Southern China will be further enhanced, despite increasing competition from neighbouring ports and airports in the medium to long term.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

S.I. Lao, K.L. Choy, G.T.S. Ho and Richard C.M. Yam

The purpose of this paper is to propose a real‐time food receiving operations management system (RFRS), focusing on demonstrating the use of a case‐based reasoning (CBR…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a real‐time food receiving operations management system (RFRS), focusing on demonstrating the use of a case‐based reasoning (CBR) and radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in managing the complex food receiving activities in distribution centers, to deal with the global concerns in food safety management.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed system includes a CBR engine for generating customized operating procedures by retrieving and analyzing relevant knowledge stored in the database and case library. In addition, RFID technology is adopted to gather real‐time inventory information for visualizing inventories, work stations, and equipment status.

Findings

The significance and contribution of RFRS in the context of managing unstructured operations in distribution centers for the food receiving process are demonstrated by adopting the system in one of the Hong Kong‐based logistics companies. The achieved improvement of order fulfillment helps achieve a systematic management in operations process flow. Moreover, the time saving in resource assignment helps improve the operations efficiency of the receiving zone. Hence, the decrease in the faults of quality checking helps improve the service and quality level. All of the above demonstrate the feasibility of the RFID‐based decision support system.

Originality/value

A superior method for the management of quality control and service of the receiving process is essential for the success of food distribution centers. However, the complexity of these management processes increases with the rise of customization of service in the supply chain. Hence, such increase in the operation complexity leads to the increase in operation time and, consequently, a decrease in the service quality. The real‐time food receiving operations management system proposed in this paper integrated RFID and case‐based reasoning technology in dealing with food warehouse receiving operation assignment. This is a brand new application combining the two technologies in the field of food reception in warehouses. With the support of the system, the efficiency and the customer satisfaction are improved.

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Antonio K.W. Lau, Richard C.M. Yam, Esther P.Y. Tang and H.Y. Sun

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between product modularity (PM) and supply chain integration (SCI), and to identify factors influencing this relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between product modularity (PM) and supply chain integration (SCI), and to identify factors influencing this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach involving in‐depth interviews on three modular and two non‐modular design projects in the Hong Kong and Pearl River Delta region was conducted. Within and cross‐case analyses were adopted.

Findings

Results support the current view that modular design is related to a loosely coordinated supply chain, whereas integrated design is associated with a tightly coordinated supply chain. However, this relationship is affected and explained by four contingency factors: new module/component development, technological knowledge leakage and creation, project team size and supply chain efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

The paper used a case study approach so the generalizability of the study is limited. This approach, however, enabled us to examine explicitly the relationship between PM and SCI, where empirical research was lacking. The rich content of each case suggested how and why modular design affects supply chain management.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper increase the understanding of the dynamics of modular product design and supply chain management. The paper also explores four contingency factors affecting the relationship.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Richard C M Yam and Cliff Chan

In today’s market, firms are riding on the wave of globalisation to enhance competitiveness through corporate collaboration in new product development (NPD). In joint NPD…

Abstract

Purpose

In today’s market, firms are riding on the wave of globalisation to enhance competitiveness through corporate collaboration in new product development (NPD). In joint NPD, huge amounts of information and knowledge are interchanged among business partners. However, industrial experience and past research have indicated that knowledge sharing among firms invite opportunism, that is, knowledge being leaked or misused by others. To determine the means to rectify the problems of opportunism in joint NPD, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of commitment and knowledge sharing on opportunism.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire survey was conducted to verify the research model with 312 valid responses from manufacturing firms. The survey data were analysed by structural equation modelling, and the findings were verified by follow-up interviews.

Findings

Contradictory to most studies, this study finds that knowledge sharing among committed business partners suppresses, rather than invites, opportunism.

Research limitations/implications

This finding is new in the literature with strong managerial implication. Firms that hesitate to share their knowledge with others because of the fear of opportunism should commit more seriously to their business partners so that they could share knowledge for better NPD.

Originality/value

This study has reversed the sceptical belief of knowledge sharing leading to opportunism. This new belief will encourage corporate collaboration in joint NPD. However, for a comprehensive view on opportunism in inter-firm NPD, other governance mechanisms, that is, contract and trust, should also be studied in future research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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