Search results

1 – 10 of 203
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Stella Fearnley, Tony Hines, Karen McBride and Richard Brandt

The UK regime for financial reporting and auditing was radically altered in 1990 and 1991 by two separate developments. When removing sole responsibility for setting…

Abstract

The UK regime for financial reporting and auditing was radically altered in 1990 and 1991 by two separate developments. When removing sole responsibility for setting accounting standards from the accounting profession, the opportunity was taken to establish a monitoring body, the Financial Reporting Review Panel (FRRP), to oversee compliance with company law and accounting standards, and with powers to apply to the courts for rectification. In addition, a new regulatory system for auditors was set up. This paper considers the problems arising between the regulatory responsibilities of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) and FRRP. In 50 cases (up to September 1999) FRRP found defects in accounts, 49 of which were audited by firms regulated by ICAEW, but no disciplinary action was taken by ICAEW until 1999. The way in which the new audit regulations were grafted onto the existing ICAEW disciplinary regime is considered, and the anomalies arising from that explored. The cases resulting in ICAEW's disciplinary action are compared with the other cases together with some evidence from finance directors and audit partners with experience of dealing both with FRRP and an ICAEW disciplinary investigation. The relevant theories relating to professional bodies and regulation are also reviewed. Finally, the authors review the problems identified in this study and make suggestions as to how they may be addressed.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Vivien Beattie, Richard Brandt and Stella Fearnley

The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) issued a consultation document in November 1998, which set out a framework for the independent regulation of the accountancy…

Abstract

The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) issued a consultation document in November 1998, which set out a framework for the independent regulation of the accountancy profession. This framework broadly adopts the proposals put forward by the profession itself. In this paper, the focus is on audit regulation. The current regime is outlined and its structural weaknesses and procedural problems identified. The proposed reforms are described and critically evaluated. It is argued that the proposed reforms offer only a partial solution to regulatory concerns, since no changes are proposed to the existing regime either for registration, or for monitoring and discipline of the majority of audit cases. An expanded framework that rationalises current practices and provides a more comprehensive solution is suggested. A critical feature of the proposal is that a distinction is made between audits of small entities and audits of major listed companies, only the latter of which are of public interest. Each would have distinct licensing and monitoring procedures.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Vivien Beattie, Richard Brandt and Stella Fearnley

The audit function is an essential part of the regulatory structure which supports the integrity of our capital markets. There is a recognised expectations gap which…

Downloads
1087

Abstract

The audit function is an essential part of the regulatory structure which supports the integrity of our capital markets. There is a recognised expectations gap which surrounds the audit function, as many users of audited financial statements have different expectations of the audit function from what it delivers. Perceptions of auditor independence are a fundamental part of this expectations gap. In the light of recent significant changes to the regulatory framework, this paper reports a survey of leading financial journalists, to ascertain their current views on auditor independence. Findings show a belief that some of the changes have reduced the expectations gap although problems still exist in the area of non‐audit services. However, the most significant threat to independence is seen to be the economic and personal pressure on the partner as an individual, an area difficult to regulate. The challenge for audit firms is to demonstrate how well they control for this within their management structures.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

SteIIa Fearnley, Richard Brandt and Vivien Beattie

On 16th April, 2002, the authors gave oral evidence to the House of Commons Treasury Committee Inquiry into Financial Regulation of Public Limited Companies which was set…

Downloads
1435

Abstract

On 16th April, 2002, the authors gave oral evidence to the House of Commons Treasury Committee Inquiry into Financial Regulation of Public Limited Companies which was set up following the collapse of Enron. This paper is adapted from the written submission to the Committee on which their oral evidence was based. The authors argue that the Enron collapse provides an opportunity for regulators to stand back and consider fundamental issues associated with the regulatory framework for financial reporting, auditing and corporate governance in the UK. They challenge the financial reporting framework as being muddled between the concepts of stewardship and decision usefulness. Company balance sheets are an amalgam of figures based on historical cost and accounting estimates. The increasing use of financial instruments and the inclusion of intangibles makes valuations complex and judgmental and therefore much more dfficult to audit. Incentives in the capital markets which drive the behaviour of all participants should be considered to ensure that the current system does not encourage dysfunctional outcomes and excessive rewards. The personal incentives for partners in audit firms are of particular interest as a potential key influence on auditor independence. It is suggested that non‐executive directors should be mandated to protect the interests of investors. The authors counsel against kneejerk reactions to the Enron collapse as a number of changes such as the transfer of regulation of securities listing to the Financial Services Authority (FSA) and the establishment of the Accountancy Foundation need time to settle down. They believe that auditor rotation will introduce costs without clearly identifiable benefits and are opposed to wholesale banning of auditors providing non‐audit services to their clients.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Stella Fearnley, Tony Hines, Karen McBride and Richard Brandt

As part of a deregulation initiative for small businesses, the audit exemption limit was raised to £1m by the Audit Exemption (Amendment) Regulations 2000 in May 2000…

Abstract

As part of a deregulation initiative for small businesses, the audit exemption limit was raised to £1m by the Audit Exemption (Amendment) Regulations 2000 in May 2000. This paper examines the possible consequences of this change on the supply of registered auditors' services and the subsequent impact this may have on a range of business entities, other than small private companies, which use registered auditors for various purposes.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Tony Hines, Karen McBride, Stella Fearnley and Richard Brandt

The Financial Reporting Review Panel (FRRP) was an innovation in the UK as it was responsible for the previously little considered issue of ensuring compliance with…

Downloads
1768

Abstract

The Financial Reporting Review Panel (FRRP) was an innovation in the UK as it was responsible for the previously little considered issue of ensuring compliance with financial reporting regulations. This paper draws on institutional theory to compare the stated aims, objectives and operating procedures of the FRRP with the practical experiences of those who have had discussions with them, and evidence of the wider impact of their work. The aim is to provide a richer understanding of the way in which this relatively new institution achieves its objectives, and to determine whether it has engaged in “myth making” in order to establish and maintain its legitimacy. The original objectives of the FRRP are explored in this paper, as well as subsequent public pronouncements on its aims, procedures, and achievements. Discussions with key members of the FRRP have enabled further clarification of some of the issues. The perceptions of those with experience of dealing with the FRRP were gained by a series of semi‐structured interviews. Interviews were carried out with company directors and audit firm partners who had direct experience of the FRRP. The analysis draws out themes related to the investigation process and final outcomes of this process. The paper concludes that there is some evidence that the FRRP has engaged in “myth building”. For example, it was considered that cases the FRRP chose to pursue tended to involve rather less serious issues than their public statements might suggest. Also they have considerable operational discretion and this appears to be exercised in a rather unpredictable way without explanation. Overall, however, the evidence suggests that the FRRP is an effective regulator.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Susan L. Adkins

As CD‐ROM becomes more and more a standard reference and technicalsupport tool in all types of libraries, the annual review of thistechnology published in Computers in

Downloads
346

Abstract

As CD‐ROM becomes more and more a standard reference and technical support tool in all types of libraries, the annual review of this technology published in Computers in Libraries magazine increases in size and scope. This year, author Susan L. Adkins has prepared this exceptionally useful bibliography which she has cross‐referenced with a subject index.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Edward J. Valauskas

Considers what the NeXT computer can offer libraries as analternative to conventional mainframe‐PC‐terminal systems for sorting,storing, and displaying bibliographic…

Abstract

Considers what the NeXT computer can offer libraries as an alternative to conventional mainframe‐PC‐terminal systems for sorting, storing, and displaying bibliographic information. Discusses the NeXT computer hardware, software, the idea of a library workstation, and the promise of the Digital Librarian utility. Surmises that, despite criticisms of cost, NeXT offers the possibility of a transformation in the way bibliographic information is handled by both patrons and staff.

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Langdon Morris

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Alexander Nikolenko and Brian H. Kleiner

Organizations are subject to a variety of constantly changing internal and external influences, such as organizational strategy and environmental conditions. Of these, of…

Downloads
5554

Abstract

Organizations are subject to a variety of constantly changing internal and external influences, such as organizational strategy and environmental conditions. Of these, of particular importance are the development of the global marketplace and increasing global competition, and the emergence of a knowledge‐based economy that is characterized by a high level of development of communications and information technologies. In response to these factors, new forms of organization structure have emerged: the horizontal organization, the network organization and the virtual corporation. Asks whether such structures are adequate to meet the constant change of the world into which we are moving, and whether they can meet the needs of organizations in varying situations in different economies in disparate countries and with different cultures.

Details

Work Study, vol. 45 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Keywords

1 – 10 of 203