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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Richard Beach, Michelle M. Falter and Jennifer Jackson Whitley

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to make the case for the value of fostering collaborative sensemaking in responding to literature. Drawing on examples of classroom…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to make the case for the value of fostering collaborative sensemaking in responding to literature. Drawing on examples of classroom interactions in 6th-, 8th-, 11th- and 12th-grade classrooms, it proposes methods for teachers to foster collaborative sensemaking.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on theories of “participatory sensemaking” (Fuchs and De Jaegher, 2009), transactional literary response (Rosenblatt, 1994) and “comprehension-as-sensemaking” pedagogy (Aukerman, 2013), this paper conceptualizes collaborative sensemaking to illustrate how teachers foster making sense of texts through sharing responses based on lived-world experiences, understanding the use of literary techniques and understanding events in students’ own lives.

Findings

Given that this is not an empirical study, there are no findings. The discussion of students’ sensemaking practices in responding to classroom texts, suggests the importance of teachers creating open-ended response events in which students collaboratively support each other in making sense of characters’ actions and events, as opposed to having to conform to teachers’ predetermined agendas.

Practical implications

Analysis of the classroom discussions suggests the importance of building students’ trust in the process of sensemaking itself, fostering adoption of alternative perspectives as central to sensemaking and using activities for students’ translating or rewriting events in texts to co-create texts with authors.

Originality/value

This paper explores the importance of teachers engaging students in open-ended, sensemaking response events based on attending to “in-between,” dialogic meanings through sharing emotions, alternative perspectives and related experiences to enhance students’ engagement in responding to literature.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Richard Beach and Limarys Caraballo

Unlike formalist and functional approaches to literacy and teaching writing, a languaging theory approach centers on the dynamic and interpersonal nature of writing. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Unlike formalist and functional approaches to literacy and teaching writing, a languaging theory approach centers on the dynamic and interpersonal nature of writing. The purpose of this study was to determine students’ ability to engage in explicit reflection about their languaging actions in response to their personal narrative writing to determine those types of actions they were most versus less likely to focus on for enacting relations with others, as well as how they applied their reflections to subsequent interactions with others.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study, thirty seven 12th grade students were asked to write personal narratives and then reflect in writing on their use of languaging actions in their narratives based on specific prompts. Students’ explicit reflections about their narratives were coded based on their reference to seven different types of languaging actions for enacting relations with others.

Findings

Students were most likely to focus their reflections on making connections, understandings, collaboration and support by and for others as well as expression of emotions, getting feelings out, sharing issues; followed by references to conflicts, arguing, stress, negative perceptions or exclusion; references to ideas or impressions about ethics, respect, values, morals; use of “insider language;” slang, jargon, dialects; use of humor, joking, parody; and references to adult and authorities’ perceptions or influences.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to students’ portrayals of their languaging actions through writing as opposed to observations of their lived-world interactions with others.

Practical implications

These results suggest the value of having students engage in explicit reflections about their languaging actions portrayed in narratives as contributing to their growth in use of languaging actions for enacting relations with others.

Social implications

Students’ ability to reflect on their language actions enhances their ability to enact social relations.

Originality/value

A languaging perspective provides an alternative approach for analyzing reflections on types of languaging actions.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Mary M. Snow and Richard K. Snow

This paper aims to discuss rising sea levels at the global, regional, and community scale and illustrate the necessity for public comprehension and involvement. It also…

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1223

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss rising sea levels at the global, regional, and community scale and illustrate the necessity for public comprehension and involvement. It also aims to demonstrate geographic information systems (GIS) as an efficient tool for modeling and disseminating information with the expectation that coastal communities will benefit by joining in a process to integrate this knowledge into broad‐based decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

GIS is capable of creating, analyzing, and displaying sea level rise scenarios enabling local officials to address the negative effects of elevated sea levels by allowing them to identify both built and biotic communities that are at risk, assess the situation, and develop mitigation strategies. The paper makes use of a case study of Daytona Beach, Florida, to examine the impacts of storm surge.

Findings

A GIS model, produced for south Florida integrating land use and elevation data to illustrate locations that lie below five feet, reveals that heavily populated urban areas in Miami‐Dade County could be inundated during extreme high tide and storm surge events. The GIS also indicates that much of the Florida Keys has elevations below five feet and is at risk of flooding if sea levels rise at projected rates.

Originality/value

The case study of Daytona Beach, Florida, can be replicated at other coastal locations by using GIS to assimilate spatial data and generate meaningful graphic models to be interpreted by those responsible for minimizing the risks from rising sea levels.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Book part
Publication date: 23 January 2017

Amanda Haertling Thein, Richard Beach and Anthony Johnston

A thematic focus on identity has for years been a mainstay of secondary school literature curricula. Typical curricular units engage students in questions related to what…

Abstract

A thematic focus on identity has for years been a mainstay of secondary school literature curricula. Typical curricular units engage students in questions related to what it means to come of age and to develop an integrated sense of individual identity in the face of societal pressures toward conformity. This common thematic focus relies on conventional theories of identity as static, located in the individual, and linked to an autonomous self. Further, this focus positions adolescents as incomplete people, lacking fully formed identities. Current sociocultural theories of identity, however, understand identity as multiple, fluid, performed, and shaped by cultural histories and social contexts. Identity, in this view is always in process. Adolescents are fully formed people with identities that are no more or less complete than those of anyone else. Such a view of identity requires a more complex and nuanced conceptualization of adolescents, their capabilities, and their interactions with texts than does an individual view of identity. In this chapter, we outline a framework for identity focused literature instruction that relies on sociocultural understandings of identity, then draw on illustrations from classroom research to explore three key ways that an identity-focused approach challenges current approaches to pre-service teacher education related to literature instruction. Specifically, we explore challenges to the ways that we teach teachers to select and evaluate literary texts, plan literature instruction, and engage in inquiry and dialogue with students.

Details

Innovations in English Language Arts Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-050-9

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Richard W. Beach, John Michael Scott and Greg Klotz

Purpose – To describe the use of the software platform, TechScaffold, for use in teacher education to provide pre-service and in-service teachers with decision-making…

Abstract

Structured Abstract

Purpose – To describe the use of the software platform, TechScaffold, for use in teacher education to provide pre-service and in-service teachers with decision-making heuristics to select apps based on formulation of their instructional purposes for using those apps; participate in a community designed to foster knowledge and experience about effective, purposeful uses of apps; and share project reports to illustrate the use of apps to achieve certain learning objectives.

Design – The authors draw on research related to decision-making associated with purposeful uses of apps as well as analysis of the limitations of similar instructional design tools to develop features for TechScaffold. They sought to scaffold teachers’ decision-making through users formulating open-ended responses to queries with responses matched against a database of apps identified according to platform, purpose, grade level, difficulty, and cost, as well as ways for users to participate as members of a community to share projects illustrating uses of apps. The authors also obtained feedback regarding the potential usability and value of TechScaffold.

Findings – Given research indicating the importance of scaffolding decision-making processes regarding uses of apps, feedback from users indicated that they perceive TechScaffold as a useful tool within the context of teacher education as well as for professional development in schools to foster effective decision-making associated with purposeful uses of apps.

Practical Implications – Teacher educators can employ scaffolding activities to help pre-service and in-service teachers make decisions regarding productive uses of apps through their open-ended formulation of certain purposes through use of a tool such as TechScaffold.

Details

Best Practices in Teaching Digital Literacies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-434-5

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Phillip Brown, Samer Hassan, Shelly-Ann Whitely-Clarke and Richard Teare

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774

Abstract

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Russell Jaffe, Robert A. Nash, Richard Ash, Norm Schwartz, Robert Corish, Tammy Born, James P. Carter and Harold Lazarus

Healthcare is both the largest (17 + percent) and the most rapidly growing (three plus times the consumer product index (measure of inflation) and half a percent of gross…

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1176

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare is both the largest (17 + percent) and the most rapidly growing (three plus times the consumer product index (measure of inflation) and half a percent of gross domestic product each year) segment of the US economy. The purpose of this paper is to focus on outcome successes that illustrate application of a previously reported health equation. The health equation allows an organized and more transparent assessment of healthcare outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach includes “end use/least cost” techniques that identifies healthful care as a big unmet need (BUN) and equally attractive business opportunity in identifying health promotion that improves outcome at lower net costs.

Findings

Opportunity exists to reduce costs while also reducing adverse events, healthcare morbidity and morality. Transparency is essential to find what works more effectively to yield desired outcomes. Metrics and measures, particularly more precise tools to assess true outcome in promoting health or managing ill health, are given priority as they allow quantified and, often econometric, outcome opportunities in the midst of current uncertainties.

Practical implications

This paper is for consumers and businesses, managers and administrators, professionals and allied health professionals. The successes described herein illustrate fundamental opportunities driving change and innovation within healthcare and in our society.

Originality/value

Attention is called to opportunity areas that can fund out of savings the transition from the authors' current “sickness care” system to a healthful care, proactive prevention approach to delivering care. Novel application of transparency and end use/least cost can help guide choices to achieve healthier outcomes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Russell Jaffe, Robert A. Nash, Richard Ash, Norm Schwartz, Robert Corish, Tammy Born and Harold Lazarus

This article aims to present an equation of health to allow measurement and more precise comparison of what is more or less effective in promoting health or managing ill…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to present an equation of health to allow measurement and more precise comparison of what is more or less effective in promoting health or managing ill health. It builds upon and extends a prior report (JMD, Volume 25 Number 10, 2006, pp. 981‐995).

Design/methodology/approach

Applying basic scientific methods and empiric observations, the equation proposed in this article is a state of the current science. Such an equation allows for more systematic and predictive comparison of health initiatives.

Findings

The pace of scientific progress is outstripping our institutional adaptive response mechanisms. An approach to the causes of ill health appears more promising than re‐configuration of current disease reactive, symptom treatment care. This paper starts from first principles and builds a model that results in an equation of health.

Research limitations/implications

Refinement of the model and replication by others are needed to fully determine the predictive value of this approach.

Practical implications

The opportunity to reduce costs while also reducing adverse events, healthcare morbidity and morality.

Originality/value

This article calls attention to areas of opportunity to fund out of savings the transition from our current “sick care” system to a health promotion/proactive prevention approach to caring.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Russell Jaffe, Robert A. Nash, Richard Ash, Norman Schwartz, Robert Corish, Tammy Born, Harold Lazarus and ASIMP Working Group on Healthcare Transparency

Healthcare is an ever‐growing segment of the American economy. Transparency facilitates better decision‐making and better outcomes measures. The purpose of this paper is…

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3384

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare is an ever‐growing segment of the American economy. Transparency facilitates better decision‐making and better outcomes measures. The purpose of this paper is to present the human and economic results of increasing transparency.

Design/methodology/approach

The ASIMP Working Group on Healthcare Transparency represents a diverse yet conscilient group of practitioners, researchers, regulators, economists, and academics. Given the need for re‐envisioning healthcare to include more accountability, evidence of efficacy and transparency, this integrative medicine (ASIMP) working group is suitable to address the above purpose.

Findings

Substantial opportunity exists to reduce morbidity and mortality, suffering and excess death, unnecessary costs and risks. Greater transparency facilitates the transition to safer, more effective, more humane healthcare.

Research limitations/implications

This paper starts from a need to improve clinical outcomes and value for resources devoted. Best efforts of a national working group are presented. The implications of the report, when tested, will determine the enduring value of this work.

Practical implications

Consumers and business, administrators and practitioners can improve care at lower cost by increasing transparency. This will accelerate the diffusion of effective approaches that are not yet in widespread use despite replication of efficacy.

Originality/value

This is the first time an integrative approach has been compared with conventional healthcare models, particularly with regard to the role of transparency in healthcare management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Michael Schuyler

Supplies and suppliers are often given short shrift by vendors of computer systems. The simple statement, “Plan for supplies,” is often the only clue vendors give you that…

Abstract

Supplies and suppliers are often given short shrift by vendors of computer systems. The simple statement, “Plan for supplies,” is often the only clue vendors give you that computer supplies will be a big part of your life. This is unfortunate because the cost of computer supplies is not at all trivial. Whether you need printer ribbons that cost $5 apiece or disk packs that cost $1,200 apiece, you will keep buying these items, over and over again, for the life of the system.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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