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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Richard A. Swanson and Catherine M. Sleezer

The gap between evaluation theory and practice is a serious problem for training in industry and business[1]. A recent literature review of the summative evaluation on…

Abstract

The gap between evaluation theory and practice is a serious problem for training in industry and business[1]. A recent literature review of the summative evaluation on training noted:

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Catherine M. Sleezer and Richard A. Swanson

Explains the advantages of using a culture survey as part of anorganization′s change effort and examines the use of culture surveys ininformation gathering and…

Abstract

Explains the advantages of using a culture survey as part of an organization′s change effort and examines the use of culture surveys in information gathering and communication. Culture surveys, used properly, become invaluable in guiding change. Used improperly, however, they can be counterproductive. Describes the principles for designing, implementing and analysing the data resulting from a culture survey, along with a case study describing the successful application of these principles in one organization.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Brian P. Murphy and Richard A. Swanson

There are many reasons for engaging in evaluating training and development (T&D). One reason would be to keep a complete, accurate, and detailed account of the…

Abstract

There are many reasons for engaging in evaluating training and development (T&D). One reason would be to keep a complete, accurate, and detailed account of the satisfaction, learning, and performance resulting from every T&D programme. This is typically the view of the evaluation expert who sees evaluation as central to the T&D process. This view usually is expensive in terms of time and money.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Richard A. Swanson

Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Hyeon-Cheol Bong and Yonjoo Cho

The purpose of this paper was to explore how the two groups of action learning experts (Korean and non-Korean experts) define success of action learning to see whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to explore how the two groups of action learning experts (Korean and non-Korean experts) define success of action learning to see whether there are any cultural differences. To this end, the authors conducted a total of 44 interviews with action learning experts around the world. Research questions guiding our inquiry included: How do action learning experts around the world define the success of action learning? Are there any cultural differences in action learning experts’ definitions of success? What do we learn from action learning experts’ definitions of success?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors approached willing participants first and then recruited more participants using a snowball sampling technique by requesting them to help us make contact with additional participants. Due to interview participants’ busy schedule at an international conference and work, individual interviews took approximately 30 min to complete using an interview protocol of 10 questions regarding the definitions of success in action learning.

Findings

To answer RQ1 (How do action learning experts around the world define the success of action learning?) and RQ2 (Are there any cultural differences in action learning experts’ definitions of success?), the authors analyzed interview data using a content analysis method. Analysis of interview participants’ narratives generated four themes including: definitions of success in action learning, the context where action learning is being practiced, challenges in action learning practice and the comparison of action learning with other approaches. The authors compared and contrasted cultural differences in the review of non-Korean and Korean experts’ narratives.

Research limitations/implications

The authors presented four significant discussion agendas including: cultural differences, relationships between interview questions, typology of definitions of success and comparing action learning with other approaches. Based on the discussion, the authors presented four propositions, three research questions, two methodological questions and two more questions for cultural differences for future investigation.

Practical implications

To answer RQ3 (What do we learn from action learning experts’ definitions of success?), the authors provided at least three practical implications for action learning practitioners.

Originality/value

Previous studies, using research methods such as Delphi and surveys, have not captured a complete picture of the meaning of success in action learning, and the interview method was used for a small number of experts only. In addition, as action learning originally emerged from the UK and Europe, and Korean companies adopted a US approach to action learning with little effort at indigenization, international comparison studies were called for, so the authors turned to action learning experts around the world to learn how they define success in action learning.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Peter Adamson and Jim Caple

Presents a three‐level model to enable the design and conduct of an audit of training and development developed from the authors’ consultancy experience working with…

Abstract

Presents a three‐level model to enable the design and conduct of an audit of training and development developed from the authors’ consultancy experience working with training and development managers and specialists from diverse medium and large organizations. Describes three levels ‐ event/programme, function and organization levels. Considerably extends the framework first described by one of the authors in an earlier article. This extended model permits the benchmarking of training and development against established best practice. Use of the model enables the identification of where an organization’s training and development can be considered successful and where challenges and opportunities for improvement exist.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Richard C. Leventhal and Andree Swanson

The purpose of this paper is to identify resources that are available in the online marketing classroom and to further contemplate the applications for marketing managers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify resources that are available in the online marketing classroom and to further contemplate the applications for marketing managers. The authors explore the rationale for using technology to deliver course material and the positive results that accrue in terms of these efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative research design was used for this study so as to gain broad perspective of technology’s application to the classroom.

Findings

Four types of learners exist: visual learners, auditory learners, 30 read and write learners and kinesthetic learners (Fleming and Mills, 1922a, 1922b). All four types must be addressed in the online learning environment.

Practical implications

Many educators in higher education will use various forms of rudimentary technology in the classroom, but have yet to embrace or understand the full potential of such applications. Online learning uses both synchronous and asynchronous techniques to engage the student so as to improve the individual’s knowledge, skills and abilities.

Originality/value

Technology applications to the marketing classroom have become a necessity for delivering course content to a wide audience of individual learners, both in higher education and in industry as well.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Book part
Publication date: 15 August 2002

Andreas Kontoleon, Richard Macrory and Timothy Swanson

The paper focuses on the question of the extent to which individual preference-based values are suitable in guiding environmental policy and damage assessment decisions…

Abstract

The paper focuses on the question of the extent to which individual preference-based values are suitable in guiding environmental policy and damage assessment decisions. Three criteria for “suitableness” are reviewed: conceptual, moral and legal. Their discussion suggests that: (i) the concept of economic value as applied to environmental resources is a meaningful concept based on the notion of trade-off; (ii) the limitations of the moral foundations of cost-benefit analysis do not invalidate its use as a procedure for guiding environmental decision making; (iii) the input of individual preferences into damage assessment is compatible with the basic foundations of tort law; (iv) using individual preference-based methods provides incentives for efficient levels of due care; (v) determining standing is still very contentious for various categories of users as well as for aggregating non-use values. Overall, the discussion suggests that the use of preference-based approaches in both the policy and legal arenas is warranted provided that they are accurately applied, their limitations are openly acknowledged and they assume an information-providing rather than a determinative role.

Details

An Introduction to the Law and Economics of Environmental Policy: Issues in Institutional Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-888-0

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Rita Alvelos, Aristides I Ferreira and Reid Bates

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of factors that affect training effectiveness. According to the literature, social support, perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of factors that affect training effectiveness. According to the literature, social support, perceived content validity, transfer design, the motivation to improve work through learning and positive transfer, contribute to the effectiveness of training.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample used consisted of 202 employees with ages between 18 and 60 years, working for an insurance company where they had training for a period of three months.

Findings

The results show a relationship between perceived content validity and transfer design, as well as with the motivation to improve work through learning. A mediating role of social support was also evident in this relationship. Finally, the authors highlight the findings of the relationship between motivation to improve work through learning and positive transfer.

Originality/value

These findings contribute to the literature by demonstrating how the role of social support can increase training effectiveness in organizations.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-377-4

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