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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Rhonda Maria Young, Garry Raymond Prentice and Christopher George McLaughlin

There is a need to address the implications of offender electronic monitoring (EM) within Ireland. Thus this research examined prisoner EM participation intentions through an…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a need to address the implications of offender electronic monitoring (EM) within Ireland. Thus this research examined prisoner EM participation intentions through an application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) (Ajzen, 1991).

Design/methodology/approach

A male sample (n=101) from two Dublin prisons completed a TPB survey anonymously.

Findings

The moderately favourable prisoner attitudes suggested positive orientations towards participation in EM but did suggest some perceived difficulties. Subjective norms had a strong positive influence on intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Prisoner intentions were generally positive towards EM participation. This bodes well for future EM schemes in Ireland. It is also essential to gather other perspectives relevant to the prison system, when implementing EM.

Originality/value

The TPB offers an effective approach to understanding prisoner's EM intentions. More specifically, the TPB pinpointed the prisoners’ favourable intentions towards participating in an EM scheme by highlighting the influence of positive attitudes towards EM and their strong belief that significant others shared these positive attitudes.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Maira Quintanilha, Maria J. Mayan, Megan Jarman and Rhonda C. Bell

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence of household food insecurity among immigrant women connected to perinatal programs offered through a community-based…

2135

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence of household food insecurity among immigrant women connected to perinatal programs offered through a community-based organization in Edmonton, and to explore their experiences in coping with food insecurity.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a mixed methods research design. A community-based participatory research approach was used to engage health workers who were connected to immigrant women and families through the Multicultural Health Brokers Cooperative in Edmonton. Through the health workers a sample of 213 immigrant women connected to their perinatal programs completed the Household Food Security Survey. Following the survey, 17 women completed semi-structured interviews which were analyzed using content analysis.

Findings

The vast majority of women (94 percent (n=199)) lived in food insecure households, and 53 percent (n=112) in severely food insecure. In semi-structured interviews, women specifically described not having enough money to buy vegetables, fruit and meat, and perceiving a lack of control over foods they ate and offered to their families.

Practical implications

This study highlights the need for support to be provided to immigrant families for acquiring healthy food in Canada.

Originality/value

The mixed methods design with a decent sample of often underrepresented research participants highlights an area in need of further research and greater support.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Lynn M. Hemmer, Jean Madsen and Mario S. Torres

The expansion of alternative education, globally, has coincided with a shift towards greater accountability for ensuring educational access and opportunity, high academic…

1676

Abstract

Purpose

The expansion of alternative education, globally, has coincided with a shift towards greater accountability for ensuring educational access and opportunity, high academic standards and increased graduation rates. While studies suggest the pervasive influence of accountability may be redefining how school leaders provide meaningful learning experiences and facilitating high achievement, little is known about school leaders of alternative schools administering accountability polices. If there are inconsistencies between meaningful learning experiences for at‐risk students and performance‐based standards outcomes, this may suggest issues around equity and alternative schools that should be evaluated. Using a theoretical frame of policy implementation, specifically the authoritative design of policy and social constructs of compliance, this study aims to examine how alternative school leaders implement accountability policies.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross‐case study employs a qualitative thematic strategy of data analysis in conjunction with Fairclough's three‐dimensional framework of discourse analysis to examine how seven school leaders at five alternative schools in California and Texas interpret and administer accountability policy.

Findings

The theme of reconciliation: tension between compliance and innovation was revealed from the data. The discourses surrounding the nature of students at risk and policy compliance converged, creating a notion that alternative school leaders were losing their autonomy as knowing what is best for their students amidst increasing accountability standards.

Research limitations/implications

While many of the administrators are positioned by their districts to act as an at‐risk student expert when designing or sustaining academic and social programs at their respective alternative schools, they are in the process of losing some of their autonomy because of the pressures derived from accountability standards. However, school leaders continue to take responsive and reflexive actions to create distance between their settings and accountability policy in order to protect their students and schools from external pressures.

Originality/value

The study presents original findings in the area of accountability policy implementation in alternative school settings. This work suggests that the social constructs of compliance and student risk factors converge with the authoritative nature of accountability policy. In turn, tension was created for alternative school leaders as they consider what is best for at‐risk students.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Abstract

Details

Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

Abstract

Details

Creative Ageing and the Arts of Care: Reframing Active Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-435-9

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Colby Riggs and Holly Tomren

To share highlights of the presentations made at the Digital Library Federation (DLF) Spring Forum which is a semi‐annual meeting for DLF members and guests to learn about what is…

707

Abstract

Purpose

To share highlights of the presentations made at the Digital Library Federation (DLF) Spring Forum which is a semi‐annual meeting for DLF members and guests to learn about what is happening and evolving in the digital spheres of libraries and their partnership organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Conference report.

Findings

A wide range of things are taking place in academic, public and special libraries. Staff members are forming teams to explore how best to utilize technology to achieve results that form stronger alliances and build larger and more critical digital collections representing a huge range of artifacts and products. As a result, new library services are being established. This showcase demonstrates how all parts of library organizations are increasingly involved.

Originality/value

The range of activity continues to expand from Forum to Forum and the accomplishments and lessons learned are wide and equally varied.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Paula Fitzgerald Bone

Examines the mature market, defined as consumers age 50 years orolder, and reviews 33 segmentation methods for the mature market andidentifies five key segmentation criteria…

1073

Abstract

Examines the mature market, defined as consumers age 50 years or older, and reviews 33 segmentation methods for the mature market and identifies five key segmentation criteria: discretionary income, health, activity level, discretionary time, and response to others. Integrates methods devised by other researchers and provides marketers with a step‐by‐step, actionable segmentation method based on these five criteria. Offers implications for managers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Ligia (Licho) López López, Christopher T. McCaw, Rhonda Di Biase, Amy McKernan, Sophie Rudolph, Aristidis Galatis, Nicky Dulfer, Jessica Gerrard, Elizabeth McKinley, Julie McLeod and Fazal Rizvi

The archives gathered in this collection engage in the current COVID-19 moment. They do so in order to attempt to understand it, to think and feel with others and to create a…

Abstract

Purpose

The archives gathered in this collection engage in the current COVID-19 moment. They do so in order to attempt to understand it, to think and feel with others and to create a collectivity that, beyond the slogan “we are in this together”, seriously contemplates the implications of what it means to be given an opportunity to alter the course of history, to begin to learn to live and educate otherwise.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is collectively written by twelve academics in March 2020, a few weeks into the first closing down of common spaces in 2020, Victoria, Australia. Writing through and against “social isolation”, the twelve quarantine archives in this paper are all at once questions, methods, data, analysis, implications and limitations of these pandemic times and their afterlives.

Findings

These quarantine archives reveal a profound sense of dislocation, relatability and concern. Several of the findings in this piece succeed at failing to explain in generalising terms these un-new upending times and, in the process, raise more questions and propose un-named methodologies.

Originality/value

If there is anything this paper could claim as original, it would be its present ability to respond to the current times as a historical moment of intensity. At times when “isolation”, “self” and “contained” are the common terms of reference, the “collective”, “connected” and “socially engaged” nature of this paper defies those very terms. Finally, the socially transformative desire archived in each of the pieces is a form of future history-making that resists the straight order with which history is often written and made.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1981

At the commencement of this decade, leaving behind the “striking seventies”, we christened it the “anxious eighties”, for there was a profound disquiet and uncertainty among most…

Abstract

At the commencement of this decade, leaving behind the “striking seventies”, we christened it the “anxious eighties”, for there was a profound disquiet and uncertainty among most of the population, a fear that things were going to get worse, but they could have hardly expected the catastrophic events of the year 1981. The criteria of quality of life are its richness, grace, elegance; by the promise it contains; inspiration and purpose, hope, determination (to survive, to make certain that the evildoer is not permitted to succeed), love of one's country — pro patria, of other days.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 83 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 16 January 2024

Ginevra Addis, Serena Nasino, Marta Massi and Mark Anthony Camilleri

Art hotels are increasingly providing an opportunity for creative artists to exhibit their artworks and collections within their premises. This research investigates how some…

Abstract

Art hotels are increasingly providing an opportunity for creative artists to exhibit their artworks and collections within their premises. This research investigates how some hotels are transforming themselves into important cultural tourism centers. Specifically, its objectives are: (i) to better understand the extent to which travelers are aware about the existence of art hotels and to evaluate their level of interest in art-oriented initiatives; (ii) to determine which attributes and features of art hotels are appreciated by travelers; and (iii) to identify the type of travelers who are willing to stay in art hotels. The findings from a descriptive survey suggest that the incorporation of art into the hospitality industry can attract a diverse customer base and could result in a sustainable competitive advantage for hotels. This study identifies four types of travelers including: Art-Infused Travelers, Art-Seeking Travelers, Art-Indifferent Travelers, and Art-Blind Travelers. These prospective tourists were categorized according to their level of awareness and interest in art hotels and art-related experiences. In conclusion, this contribution implies that artification processes within the hospitality industry can add value to the cultural tourism market. Hence, it also advances future research avenues to academia.

Details

Tourism Planning and Destination Marketing, 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-888-1

Keywords

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