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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Judith Overmier and Rhonda Harris Taylor

Introduces librarians to popular culture studies and emphasizes the importance of collection development of popular culture materials, both primary and secondary. Provides…

Abstract

Introduces librarians to popular culture studies and emphasizes the importance of collection development of popular culture materials, both primary and secondary. Provides strategies and identifies resources that can facilitate such collection development.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Rhonda Harris Taylor and Nancy Larson Bluemel

Provides an introductory guide to basic print and Web resources about pop‐up books. Includes information on paper engineers, producers of pop‐up books, exhibits of pop‐up…

1783

Abstract

Provides an introductory guide to basic print and Web resources about pop‐up books. Includes information on paper engineers, producers of pop‐up books, exhibits of pop‐up books, collecting pop‐up books, and “how‐to” guidance for making pop‐up books.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Rhonda Harris Taylor

Provides an introduction to basic Web‐based resources relevant for locating information and identifying other resources that are useful in addressing frequently asked…

700

Abstract

Provides an introduction to basic Web‐based resources relevant for locating information and identifying other resources that are useful in addressing frequently asked questions about topics and issues centered on Native Americans.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2007

Mike Freeman

1

Abstract

Details

New Library World, vol. 108 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Richard Turner

311

Abstract

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Nancy A. Gigante and William A. Firestone

This paper aims to explore how teacher leaders help teachers improve mathematics and science teaching.

3270

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how teacher leaders help teachers improve mathematics and science teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Research focused on a purposive sample of seven teacher leaders selected to vary in their time allocated to teacher leader work and their content knowledge. Each teacher leader was interviewed, as were two teachers and at least one administrator working with that teacher leader. Each interview was first subjected to a mix of deductive and inductive coding before a case study was written for each teacher leader. Ultimately, a cross‐case analysis was written.

Findings

Teacher leaders conducted two sets of leadership tasks. The paper finds that support tasks helped teachers do their work but did not contribute to teacher learning. Developmental tasks did facilitate learning. All teacher leaders engaged in support tasks, but only four did developmental tasks as well. Teacher leaders who engaged in developmental tasks had access to one material resource and three social resources not available to other teacher leaders: time to work with teachers, administrative support, more positive relations with teachers, and opportunities to work with teachers on professional development

Practical implications

When teacher leadership is intended to facilitate teacher learning, the payoff comes from engaging in developmental tasks. A key to teacher leader success is administrative support. Schools and districts should not invest in teacher leaders unless they intend to support teacher leaders adequately through time, administrative follow through, and training to help teachers develop the positive social relations on which their work depends.

Originality/value

These findings have implications for how to integrate teacher leaders into larger school improvement efforts.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Maira Quintanilha, Maria J. Mayan, Megan Jarman and Rhonda C. Bell

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence of household food insecurity among immigrant women connected to perinatal programs offered through a…

1395

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence of household food insecurity among immigrant women connected to perinatal programs offered through a community-based organization in Edmonton, and to explore their experiences in coping with food insecurity.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a mixed methods research design. A community-based participatory research approach was used to engage health workers who were connected to immigrant women and families through the Multicultural Health Brokers Cooperative in Edmonton. Through the health workers a sample of 213 immigrant women connected to their perinatal programs completed the Household Food Security Survey. Following the survey, 17 women completed semi-structured interviews which were analyzed using content analysis.

Findings

The vast majority of women (94 percent (n=199)) lived in food insecure households, and 53 percent (n=112) in severely food insecure. In semi-structured interviews, women specifically described not having enough money to buy vegetables, fruit and meat, and perceiving a lack of control over foods they ate and offered to their families.

Practical implications

This study highlights the need for support to be provided to immigrant families for acquiring healthy food in Canada.

Originality/value

The mixed methods design with a decent sample of often underrepresented research participants highlights an area in need of further research and greater support.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2022

Petra Nordqvist and Leah Gilman

Abstract

Details

Donors
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-564-3

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Lynn M. Hemmer, Jean Madsen and Mario S. Torres

The expansion of alternative education, globally, has coincided with a shift towards greater accountability for ensuring educational access and opportunity, high academic…

1513

Abstract

Purpose

The expansion of alternative education, globally, has coincided with a shift towards greater accountability for ensuring educational access and opportunity, high academic standards and increased graduation rates. While studies suggest the pervasive influence of accountability may be redefining how school leaders provide meaningful learning experiences and facilitating high achievement, little is known about school leaders of alternative schools administering accountability polices. If there are inconsistencies between meaningful learning experiences for at‐risk students and performance‐based standards outcomes, this may suggest issues around equity and alternative schools that should be evaluated. Using a theoretical frame of policy implementation, specifically the authoritative design of policy and social constructs of compliance, this study aims to examine how alternative school leaders implement accountability policies.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross‐case study employs a qualitative thematic strategy of data analysis in conjunction with Fairclough's three‐dimensional framework of discourse analysis to examine how seven school leaders at five alternative schools in California and Texas interpret and administer accountability policy.

Findings

The theme of reconciliation: tension between compliance and innovation was revealed from the data. The discourses surrounding the nature of students at risk and policy compliance converged, creating a notion that alternative school leaders were losing their autonomy as knowing what is best for their students amidst increasing accountability standards.

Research limitations/implications

While many of the administrators are positioned by their districts to act as an at‐risk student expert when designing or sustaining academic and social programs at their respective alternative schools, they are in the process of losing some of their autonomy because of the pressures derived from accountability standards. However, school leaders continue to take responsive and reflexive actions to create distance between their settings and accountability policy in order to protect their students and schools from external pressures.

Originality/value

The study presents original findings in the area of accountability policy implementation in alternative school settings. This work suggests that the social constructs of compliance and student risk factors converge with the authoritative nature of accountability policy. In turn, tension was created for alternative school leaders as they consider what is best for at‐risk students.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Abstract

Details

Current Issues and Trends in Special Education: Identification, Assessment and Instruction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-669-0

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