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Article

Rhokeun Park

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of organizational identification in the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of organizational identification in the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. It also examines the moderating roles of worker cooperatives in the relationships of emotional exhaustion with organizational identification and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys of worker cooperatives and capitalist firms in the Seoul metropolitan area were conducted in 2016. The hypotheses of this study were tested through multilevel moderated mediation analyses.

Findings

This study revealed that organizational identification partially mediated the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. The findings of the study provided evidence that worker cooperatives alleviated the adverse relationships of emotional exhaustion with organizational identification and turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

Since it was conducted with a cross-sectional data set, this study is not free from the issue of causality. However, the findings provide insights into how emotional exhaustion may be associated with organizational identification and turnover intention, and how worker cooperatives may alter these relationships.

Practical implications

Capitalist firms should provide their employees with more autonomy and more opportunities to participate in organizational decision-making, as in worker cooperatives, to induce their employees to hold more positive attitudes.

Originality/value

There is no extant research on the mechanism through which emotional exhaustion is associated with turnover intention via organizational identification, and on the moderating roles of worker cooperatives in this mechanism.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Rhokeun Park and Soo Jung Jang

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the mediating role of stress in the relationship between family role overload and job satisfaction; and second, to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the mediating role of stress in the relationship between family role overload and job satisfaction; and second, to investigate the moderating roles of self-efficacy and job involvement in the association between family role overload and stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were tested using a moderated mediation model with a data set collected from a large insurance company in Seoul, South Korea, in 2012.

Findings

The findings indicate that stress mediates the relationship between family role overload and job satisfaction. The results also confirmed that family role overload is more strongly related to stress for employees with high self-efficacy and job involvement than for those with low self-efficacy and job involvement.

Research limitations/implications

Since the survey was conducted only in an insurance company, it is difficult to generalize the results of this study. However, the findings from this study provide insights into how family role overload is transferred to dissatisfaction in the workplace, and which types of employees experience a greater level of stress from family role overload.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should identify which employees have strong self-efficacy and job involvement, and provide them with more measures to reduce stress.

Originality/value

While previous studies have focused on the relationship between work role overload and stress, the present study provides evidence of the relationship between family role overload and stress. In addition, some previous studies have researched the interactions between job stressors and personal characteristics, but the present study elucidates the interactions between family stressors and personal characteristics.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Rhokeun Park

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of organizational commitment in the relationship between job demands and job search behavior. The study also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of organizational commitment in the relationship between job demands and job search behavior. The study also explores the moderating role of worker cooperatives in the relationship between job demands and organizational commitment. There is little extant research on the relationships of job demands with employee behaviors, and the roles of worker cooperatives in those relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the multi-level moderated mediation model, this study analyzed surveys conducted in capitalist firms and worker cooperatives in the metropolitan area of Seoul in 2016.

Findings

This study provided evidence that organizational commitment mediated the relationship between job demands and job search behavior in the total sample. The findings revealed that worker cooperatives moderated the relationship between job demands and organizational commitment. In other words, while the negative relationship between job demands and organizational commitment was significant in capitalist firms, it was not maintained in worker cooperatives.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides implications on how job demands are related to job search behavior, and how worker cooperatives may alleviate the adverse effects of job demands on employee attitudes and behaviors. A potential limitation of the present study is that individual-level variables were measured by self-reports.

Originality/value

While previous studies on the JDR model have examined the interaction between job demands and individual levels of resources, the current study investigated the interaction between job demands and organizational levels of resources.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Rhokeun Park

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived organizational support (POS) in the relationship between employee participation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived organizational support (POS) in the relationship between employee participation and organizational commitment, and the moderating role of organizational strategy in those relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were tested by multilevel analyses with data from surveys of 1,105 employees and 49 managers in 49 companies located throughout South Korea.

Findings

The results demonstrated that POS mediated the relationship between employee participation and organizational commitment, and that participation practices were related more strongly to POS and organizational commitment in companies with a prospector or analyzer strategy than in companies with a defender strategy.

Research limitations/implications

Organizational-level variables were measured by one manager in each company. This study provides important implications regarding the fit between participation practices and organizational strategy.

Practical implications

Managers in prospector or the most innovative companies should provide employees with more opportunities to make decisions and to receive financial incentives for their contributions.

Originality/value

This study is unique in that it simultaneously examined the horizontal fit and the vertical fit while focussing on individual employees’ outcomes rather than organizational performance.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Rhokeun Park

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived organizational support (POS) in the relationships between job autonomy and organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived organizational support (POS) in the relationships between job autonomy and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), and the moderating role of organizational strategy in those relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested by a moderated mediation model using multilevel survey data that were collected in South Korea in 2008.

Findings

This study found that POS mediated the relationship between autonomy and OCB regardless of organizational strategy, and that job autonomy was more strongly related to POS in companies with an analyzer strategy than with a defender strategy. The results also indicated that the indirect relationship between job autonomy and OCB via POS was stronger in companies with an analyzer strategy than in companies with a defender strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a new mechanism in the relationship between job autonomy and OCB using social exchange theory. An analyzer strategy should not be treated as a hybrid of defender and prospector strategies.

Practical implications

While all organizations may benefit from providing employees with job autonomy regardless of organizational strategy, companies with an analyzer strategy in particular should provide their employees with sufficient autonomy.

Originality/value

The present study bridged the gap between the macro and micro approaches through multilevel analyses. This study is unique in that it examined the vertical fit between job autonomy and organizational strategy while focussing on individual employee outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part

Rhokeun Park, Douglas Kruse and James Sesil

Research on employee ownership has focused on questions of productivity, profitability, and employee attitudes and behavior, while there has been little attention to the…

Abstract

Research on employee ownership has focused on questions of productivity, profitability, and employee attitudes and behavior, while there has been little attention to the most basic measure of performance: survival of the company. This study uses data on all U.S. public companies as of 1988, following them through 2001 to examine how employee ownership is related to survival. Estimation using Weibull survival models shows that companies with employee ownership stakes of 5% or more were only 76% as likely as firms without employee ownership to disappear in this period, compared both to all other public companies and to a closely matched sample without employee ownership. While employee ownership is associated with higher productivity, the greater survival rate of these companies is not explained by higher productivity, financial strength, or compensation flexibility. Rather, the higher survival is linked to their greater employment stability, suggesting that employee ownership companies may provide greater employment security as part of an effort to build a more cooperative culture, which can increase employee commitment, training, and willingness to make adjustments when economic difficulties occur. These results indicate that employee ownership may have an important role to play in increasing job and income security, and decreasing levels of unemployment. Given the fundamental importance of these issues for economic well being, further research on the role of employee ownership would be especially valuable.

Details

Employee Participation, Firm Performance and Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-114-9

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Book part

Abstract

Details

Employee Participation, Firm Performance and Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-114-9

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Employee Participation, Firm Performance and Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-114-9

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Book part

Virginie Pérotin and Andrew Robinson

This volume of Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory and Labor Managed Firms consists of nine original papers grouped together under the title of “Employee…

Abstract

This volume of Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory and Labor Managed Firms consists of nine original papers grouped together under the title of “Employee Participation, Firm Performance and Survival.” The first four papers explore the growing area of empirical studies of participatory and labor-managed firms’ survival. The second group of three papers offers a number of new approaches and insights into the performance effects of participatory firms, while the final group of papers provides a broad-ranging synthesis and assessment of the experience of employee ownership and participation in transition.

Details

Employee Participation, Firm Performance and Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-114-9

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