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Book part

Tony Bovaird and Rhodri Davies

In the United Kingdom under the New Labour government from 1997 to 2010, there was a shift of power away from local towards central government, leading to a situation in…

Abstract

In the United Kingdom under the New Labour government from 1997 to 2010, there was a shift of power away from local towards central government, leading to a situation in which the role of public service organisations could appear to be mainly implementing priorities set by central government and complying with national standards, enforced through the setting of targets and the use of performance management frameworks. The key performance management systems, and the standards within them, became increasingly focused on outcomes, defined as the results that services produce that have an impact on the lives of service users and citizens – the benefits of the service rather than the volume or quality of the outputs (Willis & Bovaird, 2011).

Details

New Steering Concepts in Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-110-7

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Abstract

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New Steering Concepts in Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-110-7

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Abstract

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The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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Book part

Sandra Groeneveld and Steven Van de Walle

Multifaceted issues such as safety, social inclusion, poverty, mobility, rural development, city regeneration or labour market integration require integrated approaches in…

Abstract

Multifaceted issues such as safety, social inclusion, poverty, mobility, rural development, city regeneration or labour market integration require integrated approaches in their steering. Governments are looking for instruments that can address the boundary-spanning nature of many social problems. In their quest to achieve valued social outcomes, they struggle with their new role, and the inadequacy of both market working and government-led central agency. After three decades of New Public Management (NPM)-style reforms, the strengths and weaknesses of this philosophy have become widely apparent. Fragmentation is a prominent observation in many evaluations of the NPM approach. The fragmentation of both policy and implementation lead to unsatisfactory public outcomes and a heightened experience of a loss of control on the part of policymakers. Achieving valued and sustainable outcomes requires collaboration between government departments, private actors, non-profit organisations, and citizens and requires tools that integrate the lessons of NPM with the new necessities of coordinated public governance. The public administration literature has in recent years been concerned with the ‘what's next?’ question, and many alternatives to NPM have been proposed.

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New Steering Concepts in Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-110-7

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Article

Rhodri Thomas, David Parsons, John Barry and Valerie Rowe

This paper sets out to examine the contribution of employer co‐funding of publicly‐funded vocational education and training in the UK (i.e. training initiatives that are…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to examine the contribution of employer co‐funding of publicly‐funded vocational education and training in the UK (i.e. training initiatives that are available to all qualified applicants but funded jointly by the public and private sectors).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on qualitative research undertaken with more than 30 employers in a cross‐section of economic sectors.

Findings

The evidence from this study suggests that there is no model for how and why employers start to become engaged in co‐funding publicly‐funded training.

Originality/value

The paper identifies key issues for public policy‐makers.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

Paul R. Drake and Bethan M. Davies

This paper is the sequel to the authors' earlier paper in this journal and aims to present the “future research” outlined in that paper.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is the sequel to the authors' earlier paper in this journal and aims to present the “future research” outlined in that paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The approaches being employed by Welsh local authorities in commissioning home care from the independent sector are surveyed to see how a mixed economy of care is being implemented. The observed differences are analysed to see what can be learnt for the benefit of public sector managers concerned with the development of commissioning practices. Semi‐structured interviews have been performed with home care managers and commissioning officers in 13 (60 per cent) of the local, unitary authorities in Wales. Managers at independent home care providers have been interviewed also. The study has been ongoing since September 2004. For comparison, Barnet in England has been included because, unlike any Welsh authority, it has implemented 100 per cent outsourcing of home care. Croydon has been included as it has a good practice brokerage that has helped it to expand its provision from the independent sector.

Findings

Great diversity is seen in the approaches adopted by the Welsh local authorities when commissioning home care from the independent sector. They differ in the proportion of home care that is commissioned from the independent sector, what is commissioned, the number of independent providers and the contractual arrangements. These features are used to develop a taxonomy of home care strategies that reveals high levels of diversity. It is seen that in Wales there has been less political drive and compulsion to outsource home care than in England, but the natural desire to reduce costs in the face of a growing need for home care is now driving outsourcing in Wales.

Practical implications

This paper provides guidance to public sector managers in local authorities seeking best practice in the commissioning of home care from the independent sector.

Originality/value

The existing literature contains little research into good practice in the commissioning of home care by local authorities from the independent sector. This paper is a timely contribution to addressing this shortfall.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article

Rhodri Thomas and Huw Thomas

This paper aims to examine the extent to which micro businesses in tourism might influence the process of tourism policy formation and change in urban settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the extent to which micro businesses in tourism might influence the process of tourism policy formation and change in urban settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework that considers the motivations to participate in the policy‐making process and the resources needed to influence policy change informs a case study of micro businesses in Saltaire, UK.

Findings

The paper argues that, although the propensity of local micro firms to influence the local political agenda will be affected by structural considerations that manifest themselves differently from place to place, it is possible to identify key conditions that will need to be present if such enterprises are to challenge the power of other local interests.

Originality/value

The paper begins to redress the imbalance in the literature that has neglected micro business participation in policy formation and change.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

George Holmes, Gerard McElwee and Rhodri Thomas

Headteachers are increasingly required to be managerially focusedand operate in an uncertain environment. Argues that they are morelikely to be effective if they have…

Abstract

Headteachers are increasingly required to be managerially focused and operate in an uncertain environment. Argues that they are more likely to be effective if they have access to appropriate information. Reports the findings of a recently completed survey which suggest that schools operate largely informal and unstructured approaches to environmental scanning and tend to base their decision making on relatively superficial analyses of topical issues. Concludes by highlighting the need for further research.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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